Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29521882
[Au] Autor:Funayama M; Takata T; Koreki A; Ogino S; Mimura M
[Ti] Title:Catatonic Stupor in Schizophrenic Disorders and Subsequent Medical Complications and Mortality.
[So] Source:Psychosom Med;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7796
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Although catatonia can occur secondary to a general medical condition, catatonia itself has been known to lead to various medical compolications. Although case reports on the association of catatonia with subsequent medical complications have been documented, no comprehensive large-scale study has been performed. To investigate specific medical complications following catatonia, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of specific medical complications of schizophrenia patients with catatonia. METHODS: The 1719 schizophrenia inpatients in our study were categorized into two groups: the catatonia group, i.e., those who exhibited catatonic stupor while they were hospitalized, and the non-catatonia group, which were those who never exhibited catatonic stupor. 'Differences between the two groups in the occurrence of subsequent medical complications were examined using linear and logistic regression analyses, and models were adjusted for potentially confounding factors.' RESULTS: The catatonia group had an increased risk for mortality (OR=4.8, 95% CI 2.0 to 10.6, P<0.01) and certain specific medical complications, i.e., pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, urinary retention, decubitus, arrhythmia, renal failure, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, hypernatremia, and liver dysfunction (all P < 0.01, except for deep venous thrombosis, P =0.04) in the multiple linear regression analysis). CONCLUSIONS: Catatonic stupor in schizophrenia substantially raises the risk for specific medical complications and mortality. Hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, dehydration, and immobility, which are frequently involved in catatonia, might contribute to these specific medical complications. In catatonia, meticulous care for both mental and medical conditions should be taken to reduce the risk of adverse medical consequences.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PSY.0000000000000574

  2 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521290
[Au] Autor:Zhang R; Zhu ZJ; Sun LY; Wei L; Qu W
[Ad] Address:Liver Transplantation Center, National Clinical Research Center for Digestive Disease, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050; Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Shanxi Provincial People's Hospital, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030012, China.
[Ti] Title:Outcomes of Liver Transplantation Using Pediatric Deceased Donor Livers: A Single-Center Analysis of 102 Donors.
[So] Source:Chin Med J (Engl);131(6):677-683, 2018 Mar 20.
[Is] ISSN:0366-6999
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The outcome of pediatric deceased donor liver transplantation (LT) has not been well studied, especially pediatric deceased donor livers used in adult transplantation. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LT using pediatric deceased donor livers and compare the outcomes between pediatric-to-pediatric LT and pediatric-to-adult LT. Methods: A retrospective review of LT using pediatric deceased donor livers from June 2013 to August 2016 was performed. The patients were divided into the pediatric-to-pediatric LT group and pediatric-to-adult LT group based on the ages of the recipients. The survival and incidence of early vascular complications (VCs) were observed between the two groups. We also analyzed the risk factors of early VCs in pediatric LT and the effect of donor hypernatremia on the prognosis of recipients. Results: There were 102 cases of LT using pediatric deceased donor livers in our hospital from June 2013 to August 2016, 83 pediatric-to-pediatric LT (recipients' age ≤13 years) and 19 pediatric-to-adult LT (recipients' age ≥19 years). The ratio of early VC was similar in the two groups (19.3% vs. 10.6%, P = 0.514). Low body weight of recipient was an independent risk factor of early VC in pediatric LT (odds ratio: 0.856, 95% confidence interval: 0.752-0.975, P = 0.019). The 1-year cumulative survival rates of grafts and patients were 89.16% and 91.57% in pediatric-to-pediatric LT and 89.47% and 94.74% in pediatric-to-adult LT, respectively (all P > 0.05). In all cases, patients using donors with hypernatremia (serum sodium levels ≥150 mmol/L) had worse graft survival (χ =4.330, P = 0.037). Conclusions: Pediatric-to-pediatric LT group has similar graft and patient survival rates with those of pediatric-to-adult LT group. Low body weight of recipients is an independent risk factor of early VC in pediatric LT. Patients using donors with hypernatremia have worse graft survival.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0366-6999.226901

  3 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511980
[Au] Autor:Roumelioti ME; Ing TS; Rondon-Berrios H; Glew RH; Khitan ZJ; Sun Y; Malhotra D; Raj DS; Agaba EI; Murata GH; Shapiro JI; Tzamaloukas AH
[Ad] Address:University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
[Ti] Title:Principles of quantitative water and electrolyte replacement of losses from osmotic diuresis.
[So] Source:Int Urol Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2584
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osmotic diuresis results from urine loss of large amounts of solutes distributed either in total body water or in the extracellular compartment. Replacement solutions should reflect the volume and monovalent cation (sodium and potassium) content of the fluid lost. Whereas the volume of the solutions used to replace losses that occurred prior to the diagnosis of osmotic diuresis is guided by the clinical picture, the composition of these solutions is predicated on serum sodium concentration and urinary sodium and potassium concentrations at presentation. Water loss is relatively greater than the loss of sodium plus potassium leading to hypernatremia which is seen routinely when the solute responsible for osmotic diuresis (e.g., urea) is distributed in body water. Solutes distributed in the extracellular compartment (e.g., glucose or mannitol) cause, in addition to osmotic diuresis, fluid transfer from the intracellular into the extracellular compartment with concomitant dilution of serum sodium. Serum sodium concentration corrected to euglycemia should be substituted for actual serum sodium concentration when calculating the composition of the replacement solutions in hyperglycemic patients. While the patient is monitored during treatment, the calculation of the volume and composition of the replacement solutions for losses of water, sodium and potassium from ongoing osmotic diuresis should be based directly on measurements of urine volume and urine sodium and potassium concentrations and not by means of any predictive formulas. Monitoring of clinical status, serum sodium, potassium, glucose, other relevant laboratory values, urine volume, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations during treatment of severe osmotic diuresis is of critical importance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11255-018-1822-0

  4 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508361
[Au] Autor:Costa KM; Saxena AK
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Surgery, Chelsea Children's Hospital, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Imperial College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Surgical chylothorax in neonates: management and outcomes.
[So] Source:World J Pediatr;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1867-0687
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Postoperative chylothorax occurs due to trauma to lymphatic vessels and can occur after any thoracic procedure. This study reviewed recent literature to evaluate the management and outcomes of surgical chylothorax in neonates. METHODS: PubMed database was searched for articles in English, Portuguese and Spanish from 2000 to 2016. Data were collected for surgery, chylothorax management, complications, mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). RESULTS: Twenty studies offered 107 neonates: congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) (n = 76, 71%), cardiac malformations (n = 25, 23.4%), esophageal atresia (n = 5, 4.7%) and CDH + extralobar sequestration (n = 1, 0.9%). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) was the initial treatment in 52 neonates (48.6%), prednisolone + MCT in one (0.9%), total parenteral nutrition in 51 patients (47.7%), and three patients (2.8%) did not require any treatment. Octreotide and somatostatin were used as second or third line treatment in 25 neonates (23.4%), and 15 neonates (14%) underwent 17 surgeries, including thoracic duct ligation (TDL) (n = 9); pleurodesis (n = 3) (2 patients required TDL); TDL + pleurodesis (n = 2), and TDL + placement of hemostat (n = 1). Complications due to the chylothorax were reported in 27 neonates (25.2%): hypoalbuminemia + hyponatremia (n = 18), hypoalbuminemia (n = 4), hypoalbuminemia with cutaneous flushing as colateral effect of somatostatin (n = 1), loose stool after somatostatin use (n = 1), pneumonia (n = 1), congestive heart failure + hypernatremia (n = 1), and hyponatremia (n = 1). There were 21 deaths (19.6%) and median LOS was 53.4 days (30-93.1 days). CONCLUSIONS: Conservative management is appropriate as initial treatment for neonatal postsurgical chylothorax. Octreotide and somatostatin are safe in neonates and surgical approach should be considered in prolonged leaks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12519-018-0134-x

  5 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458016
[Au] Autor:Adewuyi A; Otuechere CA; Adebayo OL; Anazodo C; Pereira FV
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun state, Nigeria; Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address: adewuyia@run.edu.ng.
[Ti] Title:Renal toxicological evaluations of sulphonated nanocellulose from Khaya sengalensis seed in Wistar rats.
[So] Source:Chem Biol Interact;284:56-68, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7786
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nanocellulose is currently gaining attention due to its unique properties. This attention includes its application as building blocks for developing novel functional materials, plant drug and also in drug delivery systems. However, its safety remains largely untested or less understood. Thus, sulphonated nanocellulose (KSS) was prepared from cellulose (KSC) isolated from Khaya senegalensis seed (KS). KS, KSC and KSS were characterized using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), particle size distribution (PSD), zeta potential and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impact of KSS on selected renal markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in Wistar rats was also investigated. Thus, male rats were randomly assigned to four groups of five animals each and were treated with KSS (0, 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg BW) for 14 days. Thereafter, biomarkers of renal oxidative damage, inflammation and immunohistochemical expressions of iNOS, COX-2, Bcl-2 and p53 were evaluated. The results revealed KSS to have crystallinity of 70.40%, it was monomodal and has a flaky surface with agglomerations. KSS had no effect on markers of kidney function and oxidative damage, although there was a generalized hypernatremia after 14 days of exposure. Lastly, KSS enhanced the antioxidant status and immunohistochemical expressions of iNOS and COX-2 in the kidney of the rats. While the biomedical applications of KSS may appear plausible, our data suggests that it could induce renal toxicity via the combined impacts of electrolyte imbalance and inflammation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492661
[Au] Autor:Logjes RJH; Haasnoot M; Lemmers PMA; Nicolaije MFA; van den Boogaard MH; van der Molen ABM; Breugem CC
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands. r.j.h.logjes-2@umcutrecht.nl.
[Ti] Title:Mortality in Robin sequence: identification of risk factors.
[So] Source:Eur J Pediatr;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1076
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although Robin sequence (RS) is a well-known phenomenon, it is still associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality. The purposes of this study were to gain greater insight into the mortality rate and identify risk factors associated with mortality in RS. We retrospectively reviewed all RS infants followed at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital from 1995 to 2016. Outcome measurements were death and causes of death. The authors identified 103 consecutive RS infants with a median follow-up of 8.6 years (range 0.1-21.9 years). Ten of the 103 infants (10%) died at a median age of 0.8 years (range 0.1-5.9 years). Nine of these ten infants (90%) were diagnosed with an associated syndrome. Of these, seven infants died of respiratory insufficiency due to various causes (two related to upper airway obstruction). The other two syndromic RS infants died of arrhythmia due to hypernatremia and of West syndrome with status epilepticus. One isolated RS infant died of brain ischemia after MDO surgery. Cardiac anomalies were observed in 41% and neurological anomalies in 36%. The presence of a neurological anomaly was associated with a mortality rate of 40% versus 7% in infants with no neurological anomaly (p = 0.016), with an odds ratio of 8.3 (95% CI 1.4-49.0) for neurological anomaly versus no neurological anomaly. Mortality was 15% in infants with syndromic RS versus 2% in infants with isolated RS (p = 0.044). Mortality was not significantly associated with the presence of a cardiac anomaly, surgical treatment for severe respiratory distress in the neonatal period, or prematurity. CONCLUSION: RS represents a heterogeneous patient population and is associated with a high level of underlying syndromes. The present study reports a mortality rate of 10% significantly associated with syndromic RS and the presence of neurological anomalies. A multidisciplinary approach in all infants born with RS, including genetic testing and examination of neurological anomalies in a standardized way, is crucial to identify infants with underlying syndromes potentially associated with increased mortality. What is Known: • Reported mortality rates in Robin sequence vary from 2% to 26%. • Clinicians mainly focus on the morbidity of Robin sequence that includes respiratory complications due to upper airway obstruction in the period after birth. • Robin sequence represents a heterogeneous patient population and is associated with a high level of underlying syndromes. What is New: • The present study reports a mortality rate of 10% significantly associated with syndromic Robin sequence and the presence of neurological anomalies. • A multidisciplinary approach in all infants born with Robin sequence, including genetic evaluation and standardized workup for neurological anomalies, is crucial to identify infants with underlying syndromes potentially associated with increased mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00431-018-3111-4

  7 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491282
[Au] Autor:Nakamichi A; Ocho K; Oka K; Yasuda M; Hasegawa K; Iwamuro M; Obika M; Rai K; Otsuka F
[Ad] Address:Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Manifestation of Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Patient with Thyroid Storm.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We herein report a case of central diabetes insipidus complicated with thyroid storm. A middle-aged woman who was receiving treatment for Graves' disease suddenly complained of polydipsia, polyuria and general fatigue. Laboratory tests showed hyperthyroidism, hypernatremia, hypoosmolar urine and a decreased plasma vasopressin level. The occurrence of central diabetes insipidus with hyperthyroidism was revealed on the basis of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging, a water deprivation test and a desmopressin test. The clinical co-existence of diabetes insipidus and hyperthyroidism is very rare; however, the complication should be considered when hypernatremia and/or dehydration progress in patients with Graves's disease as a common autoimmune-related etiology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.0063-17

  8 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29463291
[Au] Autor:Mangat HS
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology & Neurological Surgery, Cornell University Joan and Sanford I Weill Medical College, 525 East 68 street, F-610, New York, NY, 10065, USA. hsm9001@med.cornell.edu.
[Ti] Title:Hypertonic saline infusion for treating intracranial hypertension after severe traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Crit Care;22(1):37, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1466-609X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major cause of mortality and disability. Post-traumatic intracranial hypertension (ICH) further complicates the care of patients. Hyperosmolar agents are recommended for the treatment of ICH, but no consensus or high-level data exist on the use of any particular agent or the route of administration. The two agents used commonly are hypertonic saline (HTS) and mannitol given as bolus therapy. Smaller studies suggest that HTS may be a superior agent in reducing the ICH burden, but neither agent has been shown to improve mortality or functional outcome. In a recently published analysis of pooled data from three prospective clinical trials, continuous infusion of HTS correlated with serum hypernatremia and reduced ICH burden in addition to improving 90-day mortality and functional outcome. This lays the foundation for the upcoming continuous hyperosmolar therapy for traumatic brain-injured patients (COBI) randomized controlled trial to study the outcome benefit of continuous HTS infusion to treat ICH after severe TBI. This is much anticipated and will be a high impact trial should the results be replicated. However, this would still leave a question over the use of mannitol bolus therapy which will need to be studied.
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13054-018-1963-7

  9 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29477947
[Au] Autor:Zabielska MA; Adamus J; Kowalski R; Gebicki J; Slominska EM; Khapley Z; Smolenski RT
[Ad] Address:Department of Biochemistry, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland; Department of Physiology, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Cardioprotective effect of N-methylnicotinamide salt of pyruvate in experimental model of cardiac hypoxia.
[So] Source:Pharmacol Rep;70(2):378-384, 2017 Oct 13.
[Is] ISSN:1734-1140
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pyruvate improves contractility of normal, hypoxic, and post-ischemic myocardium. However, sodium overload is a major problem with its therapeutic application if sodium pyruvate is used. Development of alternative forms such as N-1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) pyruvate may help to overcome this problem. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of MNA pyruvate in a murine model of cardiac ischemia. METHODS: Seven month old male ApoE LDLr mice that develop myocardial infarction when exposed to hypoxic stress, were used in this study. Hypoxia (8% O2 in inspired air) was maintained for 8 min and was followed by reoxygenation (21% O2 in inspired air). Four groups of mice were treated 10 min before the hypoxic event by intravenous injection of MNA, MNA pyruvate, sodium pyruvate, and saline as control. The myocardial ischemia and damage was recorded by ECG. Four hours following the hypoxic episode serum troponin T and creatine kinase activity were measured. RESULTS: Significant hypernatremia was found in the sodium pyruvate group. During hypoxia, control and MNA group developed profound STU depressions on ECG while no changes were observed in MNA pyruvate and sodium pyruvate group. Creatine kinase activity and troponin T content in the mice plasma were significantly higher in the control and MNA group as compared to the MNA pyruvate and sodium pyruvate group. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that administration of MNA pyruvate prior to a hypoxia-induced cardiac event was cardioprotective. This intervention did not cause hypernatremia in contrast to sodium pyruvate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29277507
[Au] Autor:Shah MK; Mandayam S; Adrogué HJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Renal Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX. Electronic address: maulin.shah@bcm.edu.
[Ti] Title:Osmotic Demyelination Unrelated to Hyponatremia.
[So] Source:Am J Kidney Dis;71(3):436-440, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1523-6838
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osmotic demyelination unrelated to hyponatremia is rarely reported. We present a case of osmotic demyelination in a patient with hypernatremia in the absence of preceding hyponatremia and review previously reported cases of osmotic demyelination in nonhyponatremic patients. We conclude that a rapid increase in serum sodium concentration and plasma tonicity even in the absence of preceding hyponatremia may surpass the brain's capacity for adaptation to hypertonicity and lead to osmotic demyelination in predisposed individuals. Risk factors for osmotic demyelination in patients with chronic hyponatremia and without hyponatremia are probably similar and are usually associated with states of limited brain osmolyte response, such as alcoholism, liver disease (including those undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation), malnutrition, malignancy, pregnancy/postpartum state, severe illness/sepsis, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic derangements. Clinicians should be vigilant in identifying individuals who may, even in the absence of hyponatremia, have increased susceptibility to osmotic demyelination and avoid rapid fluctuations in serum sodium concentrations in such patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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