Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29484993
[Au] Autor:Zaini S; Guan NGC; Sulaiman AH; Zainal NZ; Huri HZ; Shamsudin SH
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:The Use of Antidepressants for Physical and Psychological Symptoms in Cancer.
[So] Source:Curr Drug Targets;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5592
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:: Cancer patients are commonly associated with various physical and psychological symptoms. In view of this matter, palliative care is usually given to relieve those symptoms, improve quality of life, and increase medication adherence. Antidepressants are generally accepted for the treatment of depression among patients with or without cancer. Some other potential benefits of these medications have been experienced in clinical practice. Therefore, this study aimed to review the use of antidepressant for physical and psychological symptoms in cancer. Our findings showed mixed result of positive and negative findings in various symptoms associated with cancer patients. These studies are categorised according to the hierarchy of evidence from high to low level, namely randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case control studies, case series, case reports, as well as other type of publications. The majority of antidepressants used in cancer patients seem to be beneficial for the treatment of depression, anxiety, hot flashes and other symptoms such as sexual dysfunction, fatigue, nicotine dependence, vasomotor symptoms, executive functions, sleep problems, pruritus, as well as hypochondriasis. While fluoxetine was found to be associated to the reduction of antiemetic property in ondansetron, mirtazapine was identified to be a good alternative in treating nausea and cachexia among cancer patients. More research studies with adequate statistical power are warranted to validate the use of antidepressants among cancer patients in treating these physical and psychological symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1389450119666180226125026

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[PMID]: 29172307
[Au] Autor:Kelleher MG; Rasaratnam L; Djemal S
[Ti] Title:The Paradoxes of Phantom Bite Syndrome or Occlusal Dysaesthesia ('Dysesthesia').
[So] Source:Dent Update;44(1):8-12, 15-20, 23-4, 26-8, 30-2, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0305-5000
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phantom bite syndrome was first described by Marbach over 40 years ago as a mono-symptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis. He used the term to describe a prolonged syndrome in which patients report that their 'bite is wrong' or that 'their dental occlusion is abnormal' with this causing them great difficulties. This strong belief about 'their bite' being the source of their problems leads to them demanding, and subsequently getting, various types of dentistry carried out by multiple dentists and 'specialists'. Sadly, even after exhaustive, painstaking, careful treatment, none of the dental treatments manages to solve their perceived 'bite problems'. This is because they suffer from a psychiatric illness involving a delusion into which they continue to lack insight, in spite of the failures of often sophisticated dental treatments.1,2,3 In summary, dental practitioners, or other specialists, who suspect that they might be dealing with such a problem should refer these patients early on for specialist management by an appropriate specialist within the secondary care settings, preferably before they get trapped into the time-consuming quagmire of their management. A 'Phantom Bite Questionnaire', which is available to download free, might help. Clinical relevance: This article aims to provide professionals in various fields with guidelines on detecting, diagnosing and managing patients with Phantom Bite Syndrome (PBS). This is desirable in order to prevent extensive, or unnecessarily destructive, or unstable dental treatment being undertaken on such patients in a vain attempt to solve their problems with 'dentistry' when, in fact, these are really due to underlying mental health issues.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypochondriasis
Malocclusion
Paresthesia
Psychotic Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis/diagnosis
Hypochondriasis/therapy
Malocclusion/diagnosis
Malocclusion/psychology
Paresthesia/diagnosis
Paresthesia/psychology
Paresthesia/therapy
Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis
Psychotic Disorders/therapy
Syndrome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28744937
[Au] Autor:Romero-Sanchiz P; Nogueira-Arjona R; Godoy-Ávila A; Gavino-Lázaro A; Freeston MH
[Ad] Address:Personality, Assessment,and Psychological Treatments Department, School of Psychology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Differences in clinical intrusive thoughts between obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and hypochondria.
[So] Source:Clin Psychol Psychother;24(6):O1464-O1473, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1099-0879
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Differences and similarities between intrusive thoughts typical of obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and hypochondriasis are relevant for their differential diagnosis, formulation, and psychological treatment. Previous research in non-clinical samples pointed out the relevance of some process variables, such as responsibility, guilt, or neutralization strategies. This research is aimed to investigate the differences and similarities between clinical obsessions, worries, and illness intrusions in some of these process variables. A second aim is to identify models based on these variables that could reliably differentiate between them. Three groups of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 35; 60% women, mean age 38.57), generalized anxiety disorder (n = 36; 61.1% women, mean age 41.50), and hypochondriasis (n = 34; 70.6% women, mean age 31.59) were evaluated using the Cognitive Intrusions Questionnaire-Transdiagnostic Version (Romero-Sanchiz, Nogueira-Arjona, Godoy-Ávila, Gavino-Lázaro, & Freeston, ). The results showed that some appraisals (e.g., responsibility or egodystonicity), emotions (e.g., guilt or insecurity), neutralization strategies, and other variables (e.g., verbal content or trigger from body sensation) are relevant for the discrimination between obsessions, worries, and illness intrusions. The results also showed 3 stable models based on these variables for the discrimination between these thoughts. The implication of these results in the diagnosis, formulation, and psychological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and hypochondriasis is discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171214
[Lr] Last revision date:171214
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/cpp.2107

  4 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29226504
[Au] Autor:Melli G; Bailey R; Carraresi C; Poli A
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Medical, Molecular, and Critical Area Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Metacognitive beliefs as a predictor of health anxiety in a self-reporting Italian clinical sample.
[So] Source:Clin Psychol Psychother;, 2017 Dec 11.
[Is] ISSN:1099-0879
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Research has supported the specific role that anxiety sensitivity, health-related dysfunctional beliefs, and metacognitive beliefs may play in the development and maintenance of health anxiety symptoms. However, the role of metacognitive beliefs in health anxiety has only been explored in analogue samples. The aim of this study was to explore for the first time the association between metacognitive beliefs and health anxiety symptoms in a sample of participants who reported having received a diagnosis of severe health anxiety (hypochondriasis) or illness anxiety disorder and test whether these beliefs are significant predictors of health anxiety after controlling for anxiety, depression, anxiety sensitivity, and dysfunctional beliefs. A series of dimensional self-report measures were administered to a large Italian sample (N = 458). At a bivariate level, Beliefs that Thoughts are Uncontrollable had a stronger association with health anxiety than any of the dysfunctional beliefs and anxiety sensitivity subscales. Results from hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that Beliefs that Thoughts are Uncontrollable predicted health anxiety symptoms over-and-above depression, general anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and health-related dysfunctional beliefs. Despite many important limitations, this study supported the hypothesis that metacognition may have an important role in health anxiety in clinical samples. KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE The role of metacognitive beliefs in health anxiety is underexplored We investigated their role over-and-above anxiety sensitivity and cognitive beliefs Beliefs that Thoughts are Uncontrollable seems to play the most important role Targeting such a metacognitive belief may result in a reduction of health anxiety.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171211
[Lr] Last revision date:171211
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/cpp.2159

  5 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29149756
[Au] Autor:Lorenzo-Luaces L; Amsterdam JD; DeRubeis RJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University - Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, United States. Electronic address: lolorenz@indiana.edu.
[Ti] Title:Residual anxiety may be associated with depressive relapse during continuation therapy of bipolar II depression.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;227:379-383, 2017 Nov 08.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Anxiety symptoms are common in bipolar disorder. We explored the effect of anxiety on the outcome of acute and continuation pharmacotherapy of bipolar II depression. METHODS: Data were derived from a randomized double-blind 12-week acute (N = 129) and 6-month continuation (N = 55) comparison of venlafaxine versus lithium monotherapy in bipolar II depression in adults. We distinguished between the items of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) that capture depression vs. anxiety (i.e., psychomotor agitation, psychic anxiety, somatic anxiety, hypochondriasis, and obsessive-compulsive concerns) and examined the effect of treatment on depression and anxiety. Additionally, we explored whether baseline anxiety or depression predicted changes over time in depression and anxiety ratings or moderated treatment outcomes. We also explored whether residual depressive and anxious symptoms predicted relapse during continuation therapy. RESULTS: Venlafaxine was superior to lithium in reducing both depression and anxiety, though its effects on anxiety were more modest than those on depression. Baseline anxiety predicted change over time in anxiety, but not depression. By contrast, baseline depression did not predict change over time in depression or anxiety. Residual anxiety, specifically uncontrollable worry, was a stronger predictor of relapse than residual depression. CONCLUSION: Successful treatment of symptoms of anxiety in bipolar depression may protect against depressive relapse.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28967157
[Au] Autor:van Dijk SDM; Bouman R; Lam JCAE; den Held R; van Alphen SPJ; Oude Voshaar RC
[Ad] Address:University Centre of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Outcome of day treatment for older adults with affective disorders: An observational pre-post design of two transdiagnostic approaches.
[So] Source:Int J Geriatr Psychiatry;, 2017 Oct 02.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1166
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: First, to evaluate the outcome of 2 transdiagnostic day treatment programs. A 20-week psychotherapeutic day treatment (PDT) and an activating day treatment (ADT) program delivered in blocks of 4 weeks with a maximum of 24 weeks with respect to depression, anxiety, and hypochondriasis. Second, to explore the impact of cognitive impairment and personality pathology on treatment outcome. METHODS: The course of depression (Inventory of Depressive Symptoms), anxiety (Geriatric Anxiety Inventory), and hypochondriasis (Whitley Index) were evaluated by linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, level of education, and alcohol usage among 49 patients (mean age 65 years, 67% females) receiving PDT and among 61 patients (mean age 67.1, 61% females) receiving ADT. Pre-post effect-sizes were expressed as Cohen's d. Subsequently, cognitive impairment (no, suspected, established) and personality pathology (DSM-IV criteria as well as the Big Five personality traits) were examined as potential moderators of treatment outcome. RESULTS: Among patients receiving PDT, large improvements were found for depression (d = 1.1) and anxiety (d = 1.2) but not for hypochondriasis (d = 0.0). Patients receiving ADT showed moderate treatment effects for depression (d = 0.6), anxiety (d = 0.6), as well as hypochondriasis (d = 0.6). Personality pathology moderates treatment outcome of neither PDT nor ADT. Cognitive impairment negatively interfered with the course of depressive symptoms among patients receiving PDT. CONCLUSIONS: Transdiagnostic day treatment is promising for older adults with affective disorders with high feasibility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171002
[Lr] Last revision date:171002
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/gps.4791

  7 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28956951
[Au] Autor:Weck F; Nagel LC; Höfling V; Neng JMB
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Potsdam.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive therapy and exposure therapy for hypochondriasis (health anxiety): A 3-year naturalistic follow-up.
[So] Source:J Consult Clin Psychol;85(10):1012-1017, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2117
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in treating hypochondriasis. However, there are doubts regarding the long-term effectiveness of CBT for hypochondriasis, in particular for follow-up periods longer than 1 year. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of cognitive therapy (CT) and exposure therapy (ET) for the treatment of hypochondriasis. METHOD: Seventy-five patients with a diagnosis of hypochondriasis who were previously treated with CT or ET were contacted 3 years after treatment. Fifty (67%) patients participated and were interviewed by an independent and blinded diagnostician using standardized interviews. RESULTS: We found further improvements after therapy in primary outcome measures (d = .37), general functioning (d = .38), and reduced doctor visits (d = .30) during the naturalistic follow-up period. At the 3-year follow-up, 72% of the patients no longer fulfilled the diagnosis of hypochondriasis. Based on the main outcome measure, we found response rates of 76% and remission rates of 68%. At follow-up, only 4% of patients were taking antidepressant medication. Additional psychological treatment was utilized by 18% of the patients during the follow-up period (only 8% because of health anxiety). We found no overall differences between CT and ET. Only a trend for a greater deterioration rate in CT (13%) in comparison to ET (0%) was found. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that â…” of the patients with hypochondriasis were remitted in the long term. Thus, remission rates after CBT were twice as high as in untreated samples. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170928
[Lr] Last revision date:170928
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1037/ccp0000239

  8 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28950218
[Au] Autor:Thorgaard MV; Frostholm L; Walker L; Jensen JS; Morina B; Lindegaard H; Salomonsen L; Rask CU
[Ad] Address:The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: metthg@rm.dk.
[Ti] Title:Health anxiety by proxy in women with severe health anxiety: A case control study.
[So] Source:J Anxiety Disord;52:8-14, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7897
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Health anxiety (HA) refers to excessive worries and anxiety about harbouring serious illness based on misinterpretation of bodily sensations or changes as signs of serious illness. Severe HA is associated with disability and high health care costs. However, the impact of parental HA on excessive concern with their children's health (health anxiety by proxy) is scantly investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate HA by proxy in mothers with severe HA. Fifty mothers with severe HA and two control groups were included, i.e. mothers with rheumatoid arthritis (N=49) and healthy mothers (N=51). All participants completed self-report questionnaires on their own HA and illness perceptions and on illness worries and illness behaviour related to their children. The results showed that mothers with severe HA reported significantly more negative illness perceptions and more HA on behalf of their child (i.e. by proxy) compared to both control groups. HA by proxy may be an overlooked treatment target in mothers with severe HA, and improving our understanding of this condition can have important preventive and clinical implications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171113
[Lr] Last revision date:171113
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28877841
[Au] Autor:Tyrer P; Salkovskis P; Tyrer H; Wang D; Crawford MJ; Dupont S; Cooper S; Green J; Murphy D; Smith G; Bhogal S; Nourmand S; Lazarevic V; Loebenberg G; Evered R; Kings S; McNulty A; Lisseman-Stones Y; McAllister S; Kramo K; Nagar J; Reid S; Sanatinia R; Whittamore K; Walker G; Philip A; Warwick H; Byford S; Barrett B
[Ad] Address:Centre for Psychiatry, Imperial College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive-behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients (CHAMP): a randomised controlled trial with outcomes to 5 years.
[So] Source:Health Technol Assess;21(50):1-58, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2046-4924
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Health anxiety is an under-recognised but frequent cause of distress that is potentially treatable, but there are few studies in secondary care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a modified form of cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for health anxiety (CBT-HA) compared with standard care in medical outpatients. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Five general hospitals in London, Middlesex and Nottinghamshire. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 444 patients aged 16-75 years seen in cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology and respiratory medicine clinics who scored ≥ 20 points on the Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI) and satisfied diagnostic requirements for hypochondriasis. Those with current psychiatric disorders were excluded, but those with concurrent medical illnesses were not. INTERVENTIONS: Cognitive-behaviour therapy for health anxiety - between 4 and 10 1-hour sessions of CBT-HA from a health professional or psychologist trained in the treatment. Standard care was normal practice in primary and secondary care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary - researchers masked to allocation assessed patients at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 24 months and 5 years. The primary outcome was change in the HAI score between baseline and 12 months. Main secondary outcomes - costs of care in the two groups after 24 and 60 months, change in health anxiety (HAI), generalised anxiety and depression [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)] scores, social functioning using the Social Functioning Questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), at 6, 12, 24 and 60 months, and deaths over 5 years. RESULTS: Of the 28,991 patients screened over 21 months, 5769 had HAI scores of ≥ 20 points. Improvement in HAI scores at 3 months was significantly greater in the CBT-HA group (mean number of sessions = 6) than in the standard care, and this was maintained over the 5-year period (overall < 0.0001), with no loss of efficacy between 2 and 5 years. Differences in the generalised anxiety ( = 0.0018) and depression scores ( = 0.0065) on the HADS were similar in both groups over the 5-year period. Gastroenterology and cardiology patients showed the greatest CBT gains. The outcomes for nurses were superior to those of other therapists. Deaths ( = 24) were similar in both groups; those in standard care died earlier than those in CBT-HA. Patients with mild personality disturbance and higher dependence levels had the best outcome with CBT-HA. Total costs were similar in both groups over the 5-year period (£12,590.58 for CBT-HA; £13,334.94 for standard care). CBT-HA was not cost-effective in terms of quality-adjusted life-years, as measured using the EQ-5D, but was cost-effective in terms of HAI outcomes, and offset the cost of treatment. LIMITATIONS: Many eligible patients were not randomised and the population treated may not be representative. CONCLUSIONS: CBT-HA is a highly effective treatment for pathological health anxiety with lasting benefit over 5 years. It also improves generalised anxiety and depressive symptoms more than standard care. The presence of personality abnormality is not a bar to successful outcome. CBT-HA may also be cost-effective, but the high costs of concurrent medical illnesses obscure potential savings. This treatment deserves further research in medical settings. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14565822. FUNDING: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in ; Vol. 21, No. 50. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3310/hta21500

  10 / 2643 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28867421
[Au] Autor:Newby JM; Hobbs MJ; Mahoney AEJ; Wong SK; Andrews G
[Ad] Address:School of Psychology, UNSW Australia, Australia; Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression (CRUfAD), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Australia, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: j.newby@unsw.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:DSM-5 illness anxiety disorder and somatic symptom disorder: Comorbidity, correlates, and overlap with DSM-IV hypochondriasis.
[So] Source:J Psychosom Res;101:31-37, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1360
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reliability, validity and utility of DSM-5 illness anxiety disorder (IAD) and somatic symptom disorder (SSD), and explore their overlap with DSM-IV Hypochondriasis in a health anxious sample. METHODS: Treatment-seeking patients with health anxiety (N=118) completed structured diagnostic interviews to assess DSM-IV Hypochondriasis, DSM-5 IAD, SSD, and comorbid mental disorders, and completed self-report measures of health anxiety, comorbid symptoms, cognitions and behaviours, and service utilization. RESULTS: IAD and SSD were more reliable diagnoses than Hypochondriasis (kappa estimates: IAD: 0.80, SSD: 0.92, Hypochondriasis: 0.60). 45% of patients were diagnosed with SSD, 47% with IAD, and 8% with comorbid IAD/SSD. Most patients with IAD fluctuated between seeking and avoiding care (61%), whereas care-seeking (25%) and care-avoidant subtypes were less common (14%). Half the sample met criteria for DSM-IV Hypochondriasis; of those, 56% met criteria for SSD criteria, 36% for IAD, and 8% for comorbid IAD/SSD. Compared to IAD, SSD was characterized by more severe health anxiety, somatic symptoms, depression, and higher health service use, and higher rates of major depressive disorder, panic disorder and agoraphobia. CONCLUSIONS: DSM-5 IAD and SSD classifications reliably detect more cases of clinically significant health anxiety than DSM-IV Hypochondriasis. The differences between IAD and SSD appear to be due to severity. Future research should explore the generalizability of these findings to other samples, and whether diagnostic status predicts treatment response and long-term outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[St] Status:In-Process


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