Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hypolipoproteinemias [Words]
References found : 685 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 69 go to page                         

  1 / 685 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28483768
[Au] Autor:Meissner Y; Richter A; Manger B; Tony HP; Wilden E; Listing J; Zink A; Strangfeld A
[Ad] Address:Epidemiology Unit, German Rheumatism Research Centre, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Serious adverse events and the risk of stroke in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: results from the German RABBIT cohort.
[So] Source:Ann Rheum Dis;76(9):1583-1590, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1468-2060
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: In the general population, the incidence of stroke is increased following other serious events and hospitalisation. We investigated the impact of serious adverse events on the risk of stroke in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), taking risk factors and treatment into account. METHODS: Using data of the German biologics register RABBIT (Rheumatoid Arthritis: Observation of Biologic Therapy) with 12354 patients with RA, incidence rates (IRs) and risk factors for stroke were investigated using multi-state and Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, in a nested case-control study, all patients with stroke were matched 1:2 to patients with identical baseline risk profile and analysed using a shared frailty model. RESULTS: During follow-up, 166 strokes were reported. The overall IR was 3.2/1000 patient-years (PY) (95% CI 2.7 to 3.7). It was higher after a serious adverse event (IR: 9.0 (7.3 to 11.0)), particularly within 30 days after the event (IR: 94.9 (72.6 to 121.9)). The adjusted Cox model showed increased risks of age per 5 years (HR: 1.4 (1.3 to 1.5)), hyperlipoproteinaemia (HR: 1.6 (1.0 to 2.5)) and smoking (HR: 1.9 (1.3 to 2.6)). The risk decreased with better physical function (HR: 0.9 (0.8 to 0.96)). In the case-control study, 163 patients were matched to 326 controls. Major risk factors for stroke were untreated cardiovascular disease (HR: 3.3 (1.5 to 7.2)) and serious infections (HR:4.4 (1.6 to 12.5)) or other serious adverse events (HR: 2.6 (1.4 to 4.8)). CONCLUSIONS: Incident adverse events, in particular serious infections, and insufficient treatment of cardiovascular diseases are independent drivers of the risk of stroke. Physicians should be aware that patients who experience a serious event are at increased risk of subsequent stroke.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy
Infection/etiology
Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology
Registries
Stroke/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biological Products
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy
Case-Control Studies
Cyclohexanones
Female
Germany
Humans
Hypolipoproteinemias/epidemiology
Immunocompromised Host
Incidence
Infection/epidemiology
Infection/immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Factors
Smoking/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antirheumatic Agents); 0 (Biological Products); 0 (Cyclohexanones); 0 (Phenols); 140670-90-2 (xochitloldione)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170829
[Lr] Last revision date:170829
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170510
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/annrheumdis-2017-211209

  2 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27477401
[Au] Autor:Satoh H; Ohira T; Nagai M; Hosoya M; Sakai A; Watanabe T; Ohtsuru A; Kawasaki Y; Suzuki H; Takahashi A; Kobashi G; Ozasa K; Yasumura S; Yamashita S; Kamiya K; Abe M
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, Hypertension, Diabetology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Fukushima Medical University, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Hypo-high-density Lipoprotein Cholesterolemia Caused by Evacuation after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Results from the Fukushima Health Management Survey.
[So] Source:Intern Med;55(15):1967-76, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective The Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster forced the evacuation of residents and led to many changes in the lifestyle of the evacuees. A comprehensive health check was implemented to support the prevention of lifestyle-related disease, and we analyzed changes in lipid metabolism before and after these disasters. Methods Subjects included Japanese men and women living near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture. Annual health checkups, focusing on metabolic syndromes, were conducted for persons ≥40 years of age by the Heath Care Insures. Results A total of 27,486 subjects underwent a follow-up examination after the disaster, with a mean follow-up of 1.6 years. Following the disaster, the prevalence of hypo-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterolemia increased significantly from 6.0% to 7.2%. In the hypo-HDL cholesterolemia group, the body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and LDL-C level increased significantly in men after the disaster. On the other hand, in the normal HDL-C level group, the BMI, blood pressure, glucose and lipid metabolism, and liver function were adversely affected. The decrease in HDL-C was significantly greater in evacuees than non-evacuees in the normal HDL-C level group. Furthermore, a multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the evacuation was significantly associated with the incidence of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia. Conclusion This is the first study to evaluate how the evacuation affected the incidence of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia and led to an increase in cardiovascular disease. This information may be important in the follow-up and lifestyle change recommendations for evacuees.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data
Hypolipoproteinemias/epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL/blood
Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose
Blood Pressure
Body Mass Index
Female
Humans
Incidence
Japan/epidemiology
Life Style
Lipids/blood
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Lipids); 0 (Lipoproteins, HDL)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160802
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.55.6030

  3 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26806364
[Au] Autor:Whiteside W; Tan M; Ostlund RE; Yu S; Ma L; Rocchini A
[Ad] Address:The Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. Electronic address: wendy.whiteside@cchmc.org.
[Ti] Title:Altered Cholesterol Metabolism and Hypocholesterolemia in Patients with Single Ventricle following Fontan Palliation.
[So] Source:J Pediatr;171:73-7, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess whether an abnormality in cholesterol absorption or synthesis may be associated with hypocholesterolemia in patients with single ventricle anatomy following Fontan palliation. STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study of 21 patients with hypocholesterolemia following Fontan procedure and age/sex-matched healthy controls, with median age of 13.4 (IQR 10.6-16.1) years. Laboratory values of several biomarkers, including phytosterols and 5-α-cholestanol (for cholesterol absorption) and lathosterol (for cholesterol biosynthesis), as well as cholesterol levels, inflammatory markers, and indices of liver function were compared between patients following Fontan procedure and controls. RESULTS: The Fontan cohort had significantly lower total cholesterol (mean 117 ± SD 13.9, vs 128 ± 19.2 mg/dL, P = .03) and free cholesterol (35.5 ± 4.5 vs 39.2 ± 5.4 mg/dL, P = .02) compared with control patients. There was an increase in normalized 5-α-cholestanol (1.51 ± 0.6 vs 1.14 ± 0.37 µg/mL, P = .02), and a significantly lower lathosterol/5-α-cholestanol ratio (0.70 ± 0.38 vs 1.11 ± 0.76, P = .04). There was a strong correlation (r = 0.78, P < .0001) between lathosterol and cholesterol levels in the Fontan cohort, not seen in controls (r = 0.47, P = .04). The Fontan cohort also had significantly higher C-reactive protein, transaminases, total bilirubin, and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with hypocholesterolemia following Fontan procedure have evidence of increased cholesterol absorption and decreased cholesterol synthesis. As cholesterol absorption efficiency is a regulated process, this finding suggests an upregulation of cholesterol absorption as a result of decreased cholesterol production. In the setting of elevated liver indices and possible inflammation, this finding supports a growing body of data suggesting development of liver disease in patients receiving Fontan.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cholesterol/blood
Cholesterol/metabolism
Fontan Procedure/methods
Hypolipoproteinemias/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Biomarkers/metabolism
C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Child
Cholestanol/blood
Cholesterol, HDL/blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inflammation
Liver/metabolism
Liver Function Tests
Male
Phytosterols/blood
Up-Regulation
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Cholesterol, HDL); 0 (Phytosterols); 80-99-9 (lathosterol); 8M308U816E (Cholestanol); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 170403
[Lr] Last revision date:170403
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160126
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26608923
[Au] Autor:Manifold-Wheeler BC; Elmore BO; Triplett KD; Castleman MJ; Otto M; Hall PR
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM 87131; and.
[Ti] Title:Serum Lipoproteins Are Critical for Pulmonary Innate Defense against Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing.
[So] Source:J Immunol;196(1):328-35, 2016 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1550-6606
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hyperlipidemia has been extensively studied in the context of atherosclerosis, whereas the potential health consequences of the opposite extreme, hypolipidemia, remain largely uninvestigated. Circulating lipoproteins are essential carriers of insoluble lipid molecules and are increasingly recognized as innate immune effectors. Importantly, severe hypolipidemia, which may occur with trauma or critical illness, is clinically associated with bacterial pneumonia. To test the hypothesis that circulating lipoproteins are essential for optimal host innate defense in the lung, we used lipoprotein-deficient mice and a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia in which invasive infection requires virulence factor expression controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) operon. Activation of agr and subsequent virulence factor expression is inhibited by apolipoprotein B, the structural protein of low-density lipoprotein, which binds and sequesters the secreted agr-signaling peptide (AIP). In this article, we report that lipoprotein deficiency impairs early pulmonary innate defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenesis. Specifically, apolipoprotein B levels in the lung early postinfection are significantly reduced with lipoprotein deficiency, coinciding with impaired host control of S. aureus agr-signaling and increased agr-dependent morbidity (weight loss) and inflammation. Given that lipoproteins also inhibit LTA- and LPS-mediated inflammation, these results suggest that hypolipidemia may broadly impact posttrauma pneumonia susceptibility to both Gram-positive and -negative pathogens. Together with previous reports demonstrating that hyperlipidemia also impairs lung innate defense, these results suggest that maintenance of normal serum lipoprotein levels is necessary for optimal host innate defense in the lung.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Proteins/metabolism
Hypolipoproteinemias/immunology
Lipoproteins, LDL/blood
Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/immunology
Quorum Sensing/immunology
Staphylococcus aureus/immunology
Trans-Activators/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apolipoproteins B/immunology
Bacterial Proteins/genetics
Cell Line
Disease Models, Animal
Humans
Hypolipoproteinemias/genetics
Immunity, Innate/immunology
Lipoproteins, LDL/immunology
Lung/pathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Knockout
Signal Transduction/genetics
Trans-Activators/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Agr protein, Staphylococcus aureus); 0 (Apolipoproteins B); 0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Lipoproteins, LDL); 0 (Trans-Activators)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1501835

  5 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 26559859
[Au] Autor:Reza MA; Hossain MA; Damte D; Jo WS; Hsu WH; Park SC
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Patuakhali Science and Technology University (Barisal Campus), Babugonj, Barisal, Bangladesh.
[Ti] Title:Hypolipidemic and Hepatic Steatosis Preventing Activities of the Wood Ear Medicinal Mushroom Auricularia auricula-judae (Higher Basidiomycetes) Ethanol Extract In Vivo and In Vitro.
[So] Source:Int J Med Mushrooms;17(8):723-34, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1940-4344
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity, a rapidly growing threat to human health worldwide, is responsible for a large proportion of the total burden of disease. Therefore, obesity control could be a vital scheme to prevent many diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the activities and mechanism of Auricularia auricula-judae 70% ethanol extract (AAE) in preventing hypolipidemic and hepatic steatosis. A normal diet (ND) and a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without 0.1% (w/w), 0.3% (w/w), and 1% (w/w) AAE were given to male C57BL/6 mice. Plasma lipids and liver enzymes were measured and tissue sections of liver were examined. Further mechanistic studies of mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes were performed in vitro by verifying triglyceride, glycerol, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and messenger RNA expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification. Body weight and adipose tissue mass were significantly reduced in mice fed an ND and a HFD plus AAE compared with mice fed an HFD. In AAE-supplemented groups, plasma lipids and liver enzymes decreased dose-dependently. AAE suppressed the expression of adipogenic/lipogenic genes (PPARγ, C/EBPα, FAS) in 3T3-L1 cells without cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that AAE may reduce the risk of hepatic steatosis by modulating plasma lipids via the regulation of adipogenic/lipogenic transcriptional factors. AAE may have interesting applications to improve plasma lipids and liver enzymes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Basidiomycota/chemistry
Fatty Liver/prevention & control
Hypolipidemic Agents/therapeutic use
Hypolipoproteinemias/prevention & control
Liver/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 3T3-L1 Cells
Adipogenesis/drug effects
Adipogenesis/genetics
Animals
Blood Glucose/drug effects
Blood Proteins/drug effects
Cytotoxins/pharmacology
Diet, High-Fat
Fatty Liver/blood
Gene Expression/drug effects
Hypolipidemic Agents/isolation & purification
Lipids/blood
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Blood Proteins); 0 (Cytotoxins); 0 (Hypolipidemic Agents); 0 (Lipids)
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 151112
[Lr] Last revision date:151112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151113
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 26527880
[Au] Autor:Bosevski M; Stojanovska L
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, University Cardiology Clinic, Skopje, Macedonia.
[Ti] Title:Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study.
[So] Source:Vasc Health Risk Manag;11:549-53, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2048
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients), the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carotid Arteries
Carotid Stenosis/etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Blood Pressure
Body Mass Index
Carotid Arteries/diagnostic imaging
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Carotid Stenosis/diagnosis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis
Disease Progression
Humans
Hypolipoproteinemias/blood
Hypolipoproteinemias/complications
Lipoproteins, HDL/blood
Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications
Peripheral Arterial Disease/physiopathology
Plaque, Atherosclerotic
Predictive Value of Tests
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lipoproteins, HDL)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151104
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/VHRM.S79079

  7 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 26475369
[Au] Autor:González-Torres L; Vázquez-Velasco M; Olivero-David R; Bastida S; Benedí J; González RR; González-Muñoz MJ; Sánchez-Muniz FJ
[Ti] Title:Glucomannan and glucomannan plus spirulina added to pork significantly block dietary cholesterol effects on lipoproteinemia, arylesterase activity, and CYP7A1 expression in Zucker fa/fa rats.
[So] Source:J Physiol Biochem;71(4):773-84, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1877-8755
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zucker fa/fa rats easily develop dyslipidemia and obesity. Restructured pork (RP) is a suitable matrix for including functional ingredients. The effects of glucomannan- RP or glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched RP on plasma lipid/lipoprotein levels, cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) expression, and arylesterase activity in growing fa/fa rats fed high-energy, high-fat cholesterol-enriched diets were tested. Groups of six rats each received diet containing 15% control-RP (C), 15% glucomannan-RP diet (G), 15% glucomannan + spirulina-RP diet (GS), and same diets enriched with 2.4% cholesterol and 0.49% cholic acid (cholesterol-enriched control (HC), cholesterol-enriched glucomannan (HG), and cholesterol-enriched glucomannan + spirulina (HGS) diets) over a 7-week period. C diet induced obesity, severe hyperglycemia, moderate hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Those facts were not significantly modified by G or GS diets. G diet increased CYP7A1 expression but decreased the total cholesterol/high density lipoproteins (HDL)-cholesterol ratio (p < 0.05) vs. C diet. GS vs. G diet increased (p < 0.05) CYP7A1 expression. HC vs. C diet reduced food intake, body weight gain, and plasma glucose (p < 0.01) but increased cholesterolemia (p < 0.01), lipidemia (plasma cholesterol plus triglycerides) (p < 0.001), cholesterol/triglyceride ratio in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL (p < 0.05), cholesterol transported by VLDL and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) + low density lipoproteins (LDL), total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio and CYP7A1 expression (at least p < 0.05). HG and HGS diets vs. HC noticeably reduced lipidemia (p < 0.001), normalized VLDL and IDL + LDL lipid composition, and increased CYP7A1 expression (p < 0.01) but did not modify the cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio. HGS vs. HG decreased triglyceridemia, the triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index and increased arylesterase/HDL-cholesterol activity (p < 0.05). In conclusion, G- and GS-RP act as functional foods and notably blocked the dietary cholesterol effects. In addition, HGS-RP improved the glucomannan hypolipidemic effects, increased arylesterase/HDL-cholesterol activity, and decreased insulin resistance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases/metabolism
Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase/metabolism
Food, Fortified
Hypolipoproteinemias/diet therapy
Mannans/administration & dosage
Meat
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Blood Glucose
Cholesterol/blood
Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase/genetics
Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects
Gene Expression
Hypercholesterolemia/blood
Hypercholesterolemia/diet therapy
Hypercholesterolemia/enzymology
Hypolipoproteinemias/blood
Hypolipoproteinemias/enzymology
Liver/enzymology
Male
Rats, Zucker
Spirulina/chemistry
Sus scrofa
Triglycerides/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Mannans); 0 (Triglycerides); 36W3E5TAMG ((1-6)-alpha-glucomannan); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol); EC 1.14.14.23 (CYP7A1 protein, rat); EC 1.14.14.23 (Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase); EC 3.1.1.- (Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases); EC 3.1.1.2 (arylesterase)
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 171111
[Lr] Last revision date:171111
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151018
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25164551
[Au] Autor:Mieno MN; Sawabe M; Tanaka N; Nakahara K; Hamamatsu A; Chida K; Sakurai U; Arai T; Harada K; Mori S; Inamatsu T; Ozawa T; Honma N; Aida J; Takubo K; Matsushita S
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Informatics, Center for Information, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke 329-0498, Tochigi, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Significant association between hypolipoproteinemia(a) and lifetime risk of cancer: an autopsy study from a community-based Geriatric Hospital.
[So] Source:Cancer Epidemiol;38(5):550-5, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1877-783X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Our recent study showed that a low lipoproteinemia(a) [Lp(a)] level was a risk factor for cancer and all-cause deaths. The purpose of this study was to verify the role of the Lp(a) level on cancer among consecutive autopsy cases. METHODS: The subjects consisted of 1354 cases (775 men and 579 women). The average age at death was 79.9 years. Hypolipoproteinemia(a) was defined as an Lp(a) level of below 80 mg/L. Overall, 62.3% of the subjects had suffered from at least one to a maximum of five malignancies throughout their lives. The most frequent type of malignancy was gastric cancer, followed by leukemia, lung cancer, and colon cancer. RESULTS: The cancer-bearing status decreased linearly according to the Lp(a) level in both men and women (P=0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). The median Lp(a) level was significantly lower among the cases with hepato-biliary-pancreatic cancers or hematopoietic malignancy, but was higher among cases with lung cancer, especially lung adenocarcinoma. Hypolipoproteinemia(a) was a significant risk factor for any origins of cancer, with an odds ratio of 1.94 (95% CI, 1.45-2.60; P<0.001). It was also a risk factor for hepato-biliary cancers and leukemia, but it was a protective factor for lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggested hypolipoproteinemia(a) would be a significant risk factor for cancer except lung cancer. This study complements our previous study showing that hypolipoproteinemia(a) would increase the lifetime risk of cancer other than lung cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypolipoproteinemias/complications
Lipoprotein(a)/blood
Neoplasms/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Autopsy
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms/blood
Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms/blood
Neoplasms/pathology
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lipoprotein(a))
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 141006
[Lr] Last revision date:141006
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140829
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24684546
[Au] Autor:Kang HW; Lee SK; Kim WT; Kim YJ; Yun SJ; Lee SC; Kim WJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Chungbuk National University , College of Medicine and Institute for Tumor Research, Cheongju, South Korea .
[Ti] Title:Hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia are associated with increased hazard for urolithiasis.
[So] Source:J Endourol;28(8):1001-5, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1557-900X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To assess the association between dyslipidemia and urolithiasis, a propensity score-matching study was performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fasting blood samples were taken, and serum lipid profiles were measured in 655 stone formers (SF) and 1965 propensity score-matched controls between 2005 and 2011. The controls, from a health-screening program, did not have a history of dyslipidemia or statin use and have any evidence of stone disease, as determined by abdominal radiography, ultrasonography examination. Propensity score-matching with respect to age, sex, and body mass index was used to minimize selection bias, and the logistic regression analysis was adjusted for other components of metabolic syndrome. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the SF group had significantly higher mean triglyceride and lower total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels (each P<0.001). The SF group was also more likely to have hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterolemia, and less likely to have hypercholesterolemia and high LDL cholesterolemia compared with controls (each P<0.05). When adjusted for other components of metabolic syndrome including obesity, presence of diabetes mellitus or hypertension, the odds ratio (OR) for urinary stones appeared with hypercholesterolemia (OR=0.747, P=0.003), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=1.901, P<0.001), low HDL cholesterolemia (OR=1.886, P<0.001) and high LDL cholesterolemia (OR=0.610, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study implies that dyslipidemia may play a crucial part in urinary stone risk.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypertriglyceridemia/complications
Hypolipoproteinemias/complications
Lipoproteins, HDL/blood
Urolithiasis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Mass Index
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol/blood
Fasting/blood
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia/blood
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Propensity Score
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Urolithiasis/drug therapy
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lipoproteins, HDL); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 161018
[Lr] Last revision date:161018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140402
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/end.2014.0135

  10 / 685 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24075885
[Au] Autor:Scichilone N; Rizzo M; Benfante A; Catania R; Giglio RV; Nikolic D; Montalto G; Bellia V
[Ad] Address:BioMedical Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties (DiBiMIS), University of Palermo, Italy; Euro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and Technology, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.scichilone@unipa.it.
[Ti] Title:Serum low density lipoprotein subclasses in asthma.
[So] Source:Respir Med;107(12):1866-72, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1532-3064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The levels of serum low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have been implicated in the inflammatory cascade in a murine model of asthma. Recent findings suggest that LDL may modulate the inflammatory state of the asthmatic airways in humans. OBJECTIVE: We explored whether LDL subclasses are associated with the occurrence and severity of asthma. METHODS: 24 asthmatics (M/F: 11/13) and 24 healthy individuals, with normal BMI and absence of metabolic syndrome, matched for age and gender. Serum concentrations of LDL subclasses were distributed as seven bands (LDL-1 and -2 defined as large, least pro-inflammatory LDL, and LDL-3 to -7 defined as small, most pro-inflammatory LDL), using the LipoPrint(©) System (Quantimetrix Corporation, Redondo Beach, CA, USA). RESULTS: LDL-1 was similar in the two groups (56 ± 16% vs. 53 ± 11, p = NS), while LDL-2 was significantly lower in asthmatics as compared to controls (35 ± 8% vs. 43 ± 10%, p = 0.0074). LDL-3 levels were two-fold higher in the asthmatics, but the difference did not reach the statistical significance (8 ± 7.3% vs. 4 ± 3%, p = NS). Smaller subclasses LDL-4 to LDL-7 were undetectable in controls. In asthmatics, LDL-1 was positively associated with VC% predicted (r = +0.572, p = 0.0035) and FEV1% predicted (r = +0.492, p = 0.0146). LDL-3 was inversely correlated with both VC% predicted (r = -0.535, p = 0.0071) and FEV1% predicted (r = -0.465, p = 0.0222). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this pilot study suggest a role of LDL in asthma, and advocate for larger studies to confirm the association between asthma and dyslipidemia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthma/etiology
Hypolipoproteinemias/complications
Lipoproteins, LDL/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma/blood
Asthma/classification
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology
Humans
Hypolipoproteinemias/blood
Lipoproteins, LDL/classification
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Vital Capacity/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lipoproteins, LDL)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 131211
[Lr] Last revision date:131211
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131001
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 69 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information