Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hypothalamic and Diseases [Words]
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[PMID]: 29431947
[Au] Autor:Lapko IV; Kiryakov VA; Pavlovskaya NA; Oshkoderov OA; Klimkina KV
[Ti] Title:[Choice of informative laboratory biomarkers for the early identification of changes in neurohumoral regulation and carbohydrate exchange in workers of the mining and mechanical engineering industry].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(11):1061-5, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The diagnostic significance of hormones and integral indices of pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system and carbohydrate metabolism (ACTH (corticotropin), aldosterone, cortisol, TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total and free testosterone, insulin, integral pituitary-adrenal index (IPAI), the pituitary-thyroid index (PTI), indices of carbohydrate metabolism (Caro and HOMA-IR) was studied for the early diagnostics of disorders of neurohumoral regulation in workers of mining and mechanical engineering industries. The most informative indices, permitting to identify disorders of carbohydrate metabolism are established to be indices of insulin resistance (index Caro and index NOMA-IR) and the determination of insulin in serum. For the identification of changes in pituitary adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system in patients with vibration disease, sensory-neural hearing loss, comorbidity indexes IGNI, ITI, concentrations of LH and total testosterone are of the most diagnostically significance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone/blood
Insulin/blood
Occupational Diseases
Thyrotropin/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Biomarkers/blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism/physiology
Extraction and Processing Industry/methods
Extraction and Processing Industry/standards
Female
Humans
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases/blood
Occupational Diseases/diagnosis
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
Occupational Health
Pituitary-Adrenal System/metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Insulin); 9002-60-2 (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone); 9002-68-0 (Follicle Stimulating Hormone); 9002-71-5 (Thyrotropin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29457782
[Au] Autor:Kim GH; Shi G; Somlo DR; Haataja L; Song S; Long Q; Nillni EA; Low MJ; Arvan P; Myers MG; Qi L
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Hypothalamic ER-associated degradation regulates POMC maturation, feeding, and age-associated obesity.
[So] Source:J Clin Invest;128(3):1125-1140, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1558-8238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons function as key regulators of metabolism and physiology by releasing prohormone-derived neuropeptides with distinct biological activities. However, our understanding of early events in prohormone maturation in the ER remains incomplete. Highlighting the significance of this gap in knowledge, a single POMC cysteine-to-phenylalanine mutation at position 28 (POMC-C28F) is defective for ER processing and causes early onset obesity in a dominant-negative manner in humans through an unclear mechanism. Here, we report a pathologically important role of Sel1L-Hrd1, the protein complex of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), within POMC neurons. Mice with POMC neuron-specific Sel1L deficiency developed age-associated obesity due, at least in part, to the ER retention of POMC that led to hyperphagia. The Sel1L-Hrd1 complex targets a fraction of nascent POMC molecules for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, preventing accumulation of misfolded and aggregated POMC, thereby ensuring that another fraction of POMC can undergo normal posttranslational processing and trafficking for secretion. Moreover, we found that the disease-associated POMC-C28F mutant evades ERAD and becomes aggregated due to the presence of a highly reactive unpaired cysteine thiol at position 50. Thus, this study not only identifies ERAD as an important mechanism regulating POMC maturation within the ER, but also provides insights into the pathogenesis of monogenic obesity associated with defective prohormone folding.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377134
[Au] Autor:Yasuda Y; Iwama S; Kiyota A; Izumida H; Nakashima K; Iwata N; Ito Y; Morishita Y; Goto M; Suga H; Banno R; Enomoto A; Takahashi M; Arima H; Sugimura Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Critical role of rabphilin-3A in the pathophysiology of experimental lymphocytic neurohypophysitis.
[So] Source:J Pathol;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9896
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) is thought to be an autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the pituitary gland. Among AH pathologies, lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis (LINH) involves infiltration of the neurohypophysis and/or the hypothalamic infundibulum, causing central diabetes insipidus resulting from insufficiency of arginine vasopressin secretion. The pathophysiological and pathogenetic mechanisms underlying LINH are largely unknown. Clinically, differentiating LINH from other pituitary diseases accompanied by mass lesions, including tumours, has often been difficult, because of similar clinical manifestations. We recently reported that rabphilin-3A is an autoantigen and that anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies constitute a possible diagnostic marker for LINH. However, the involvement of rabphilin-3A in the pathogenesis of LINH remains to be elucidated. This study was undertaken to explore the role of rabphilin-3A in lymphocytic neurohypophysitis and to investigate the mechanism. We found that immunization of mice with rabphilin-3A led to neurohypophysitis. Lymphocytic infiltration was observed in the neurohypophysis and supraoptic nucleus 1 month after the first immunization. Mice immunized with rabphilin-3A showed an increase in the volume of urine that was hypotonic as compared with control mice. Administration of a cocktail of monoclonal anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies did not induce neurohypophysitis. However, abatacept, which is a chimeric protein that suppresses T-cell activation, decreased the number of T cells specific for rabphilin-3A in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). It ameliorated lymphocytic infiltration of CD3 T cells in the neurohypophysis of mice that had been immunized with rabphilin-3A. Additionally, there was a linear association between the number of T cells specific for rabphilin-3A in PBMCs and the number of CD3 T cells infiltrating the neurohypophysis. In conclusion, we suggest that rabphilin-3A is a pathogenic antigen, and that T cells specific for rabphilin-3A are involved in the pathogenesis of neurohypophysitis in mice. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/path.5046

  4 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514392
[Au] Autor:Ye Z; Liu G; Guo J; Su Z
[Ad] Address:Guangdong Metabolic Disease Research Center of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, Key Unit of Modulating Liver to Treat Hyperlipemia SATCM (State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:Hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress as a key mediator of obesity-induced leptin resistance.
[So] Source:Obes Rev;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1467-789X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity is an epidemic disease that is increasing worldwide and is a major risk factor for many metabolic diseases. However, effective agents for the prevention or treatment of obesity remain limited. Therefore, it is urgent to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development and progression of obesity and exploit potential agents to cure and prevent this disease. According to a recent study series, obesity is associated with the development of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of its stress responses (unfolded protein response) in metabolically active tissues, which contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin and leptin resistance, inflammation and energy imbalance. Hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress is the central mechanism underlying the development of obesity-associated leptin resistance and disruption of energy homeostasis; thus, targeting endoplasmic reticulum stress offers a promising therapeutic strategy for improving leptin sensitivity, increasing energy expenditure and ultimately combating obesity. In this review, we highlight the relationship between and mechanism underlying hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress and obesity-associated leptin resistance and energy imbalance and provide new insight regarding strategies for the treatment of obesity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/obr.12673

  5 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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Clinical Trials Registry
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[PMID]: 29381802
[Au] Autor:van Opstal AM; van den Berg-Huysmans AA; Hoeksma M; Blonk C; Pijl H; Rombouts SARB; van der Grond J
[Ad] Address:Departments of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:The effect of consumption temperature on the homeostatic and hedonic responses to glucose ingestion in the hypothalamus and the reward system.
[So] Source:Am J Clin Nutr;107(1):20-25, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-3207
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has been associated with obesity and related diseases. SSBs are often consumed cold, and both the energy content and temperature might influence the consumption behavior for SSBs. Objective: The main aim of this study was to elucidate whether consumption temperature and energy (i.e., glucose) content modulate homeostatic (hypothalamus) and reward [ventral tegmental area (VTA)] responses. Design: Sixteen healthy men participated in our study [aged 18-25 y; body mass index (kg/m2): 20-23]. High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected after ingestion of 4 different study stimuli: plain tap water at room temperature (22°C), plain tap water at 0°C, a glucose-containing beverage (75 g glucose dissolved in 300 mL water) at 22°C, and a similar glucose drink at 0°C. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) changes from baseline (7 min preingestion) were analyzed over time in the hypothalamus and VTA for individual stimulus effects and for effects between stimuli. Results: In the hypothalamus, water at 22°C led to a significantly increased BOLD response; all other stimuli resulted in a direct, significant decrease in BOLD response compared with baseline. In the VTA, a significantly decreased BOLD response compared with baseline was found after the ingestion of stimuli containing glucose at 0°C and 22°C. These responses were not significantly modulated by consumption temperature. The consumption of plain water did not have a significant VTA BOLD effect. Conclusions: Our data show that glucose at 22°C, glucose at 0°C, and water at 0°C lowered hypothalamic activity, which is associated with increased satiation. On the contrary, the consumption of water at room temperature increased activity. All stimuli led to a similar VTA response, which suggests that all drinks elicited a similar hedonic response. Our results indicate that, in addition to glucose, the low temperature at which SSBs are often consumed also leads to a response from the hypothalamus and might strengthen the response of the VTA. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03181217.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ajcn/nqx023

  6 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29278923
[Au] Autor:Münzel T; Daiber A
[Ad] Address:Center for Cardiology, Cardiology 1, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center , Mainz, Germany .
[Ti] Title:Environmental Stressors and Their Impact on Health and Disease with Focus on Oxidative Stress.
[So] Source:Antioxid Redox Signal;28(9):735-740, 2018 03 20.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7716
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Epidemiological, preclinical and interventional clinical studies have demonstrated that environmental stressors are associated with health problems, namely cardiovascular diseases. According to estimations of the World Health Organization (WHO), environmental risk factors account for an appreciable part of global deaths and life years spent with disability. This Forum addresses the impact of the environmental risk factors such as traffic noise exposure, air pollution by particulate matter (PM), mental stress/loneliness, and the life style risk factor (water-pipe) smoking on health and disease with focus on the cardiovascular system. We will critically discuss the use of observatory/modifiable biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in environmental research on the aforementioned risk factors highlighting the need of exposome studies. Another focus will be on the epigenetic regulation via microRNAs in environmental stress upon exposure to noise and toxins/heavy metals as well as mental stress conditions, providing mechanistic insights into the modulation of microRNA signaling by oxidative stress, and vice versa the contribution of microRNAs to oxidative stress conditions. We will also provide an in-depth overview on the mechanistic pathways that lead to health problems (e.g., cardiovascular diseases) in response to environmental psychosocial stress, air pollution exposure in the form of ambient PM and diesel exhaust, traffic noise exposure, and the life style drug (water-pipe) smoking. Almost all stressors share the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and of the sympathetic nervous system with subsequent onset of inflammation and oxidative stress, defining the here proposed therapeutic (antioxidant and exercise) strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 735-740.
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1089/ars.2017.7488

  7 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29384142
[Au] Autor:Meyer EJ; Wittert G
[Ad] Address:Endocrine, Diabetes and Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, SA 5000, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Endogenous testosterone and mortality risk.
[So] Source:Asian J Androl;20(2):115-119, 2018 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1745-7262
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In men, obesity and metabolic complications are associated with lower serum testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and an increased risk of, and mortality from, multiple chronic diseases in addition to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The causal interrelationships between these factors remain a matter of debate. In men with untreated congenital and lifelong forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there appears to be no increased risk. Men with Klinefelter's syndrome have an increased risk of various types of cancers, as well as CVD, which persist despite T therapy. In the absence of pathology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the effect of modest reductions in serum T in aging men is unclear. The prevalence of low serum T concentrations is high in men with cancer, renal disease, and respiratory disease and is likely to be an indicator of severity of systemic disease, not hypogonadism. Some population-based studies have found low serum T to be associated with a higher risk of deaths attributed to cancer, renal disease, and respiratory disease, while others have not. Although a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies has shown an association between low serum T and all-cause mortality, marked heterogeneity between studies limited a firm conclusion. Therefore, while a decrease in T particularly occurring later in life may be associated with an increase in all-cause and specific types of mortality in men, the differential effects, if any, of T and other sex steroids as compared to health and lifestyle factors are unknown at the current time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/aja.aja_70_17

  8 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498008
[Au] Autor:Zhuang QX; Xu HT; Lu XJ; Li B; Yung WH; Wang JJ; Zhu JN
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Department of Physiology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing, 210023, China.
[Ti] Title:Histamine Excites Striatal Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor-Expressing Neurons via Postsynaptic H1 and H2 Receptors.
[So] Source:Mol Neurobiol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1559-1182
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The central histaminergic nervous system, originating from the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus, widely innervates almost the whole brain, including the basal ganglia. Intriguingly, the histaminergic system is altered in parkinsonian patients. Yet, little is known about the effect and mechanisms of histamine on different types of neurons in the basal ganglia circuitry. Here, by using anterograde tracing, immunostaining, patch clamp recording, and single-cell qPCR techniques, we investigate the histaminergic afferents in the striatum, the major input structure of the basal ganglia, as well as the effect of histamine on the striatal GABAergic medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs). We report a direct histaminergic projection from the hypothalamic TMN to the striatum in rats. Furthermore, histamine exerts a strong postsynaptic excitatory effect on both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing MSNs. The concentration-response curves and the EC values for histamine on these two types of MSNs are similar. In addition, dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing MSNs co-express histamine H1 and H2 receptor mRNAs. Both histamine H1 and H2 receptors are co-localized on dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing MSNs and co-mediate the histamine-induced excitation on the two types of neurons. These results suggest that the histaminergic afferent inputs in the striatum may modulate both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing MSNs by activation of postsynaptic histamine H1 and H2 receptors and thus serve as an important extrastriatal modulator for biasing the direct and indirect pathways to actively regulate functions of the basal ganglia and participate in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of basal ganglia diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12035-018-0976-1

  9 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496265
[Au] Autor:Liguori G; Tafuri S; Miyoshi C; Yanagisawa M; Squillacioti C; De Pasquale V; Mirabella N; Vittoria A; Costagliola A
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137, Naples, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Localization of orexin B and orexin-2 receptor in the rat epididymis.
[So] Source:Acta Histochem;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0372
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The peptides orexin A (OXA) and orexin B (OXB) derived from the proteolytic cleavage of a common precursor molecule, prepro-orexin, were originally described in the rat hypothalamus. Successively, they have been found in many other brain regions as well as in peripheral organs of mammals and other less evolved animals. The widespread localization of orexins accounts for the multiple activities that they exert in the body, including the regulation of energy homeostasis, feeding, metabolism, sleep and arousal, stress, addiction, and cardiovascular and endocrine functions. Both OXA and OXB peptides bind to two G-coupled receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R) and orexin-2 (OX2R) receptor, though with different binding affinity. Altered expression/activity of orexins and their receptors has been associated with a large number of human diseases. Though at present evidence highlighted a role for orexins and cognate receptors in mammalian reproduction, their central and/or local effects on gonadal functions remain poorly known. Here, we investigated the localization of OXB and OX2R in the rat epididymis. Immunohistochemical staining of sections from caput, corpus and cauda segments of the organ showed intense signals for both OXB and OX2R in the principal cells of the lining epithelium, while no staining was detected in the other cell types. Negative results were obtained from immunohistochemical analysis of hypothalamic and testicular tissues from OX2R knock-out mice (OX2R ) and OX1R/OX2R double knock-out (OX1R ; OX2R ) mice, thus demonstrating the specificity of the rabbit polyclonal anti-OX2R antibody used in our study. On contrary, the same antibody clearly showed the presence of OX2R in sections from hypothalamus and testis of normal mice and rats which are well known to express the receptor. Thus, our results provide the first definite evidence for the immunohistochemical localization of OXB and OX2R in the principal cells of rat epididymis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 11058 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28460778
[Au] Autor:Doaei S; Kalantari N; Mohammadi NK; Tabesh GA; Gholamalizadeh M
[Ad] Address:Student's Research Committee, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Macronutrients and the FTO gene expression in hypothalamus; a systematic review of experimental studies.
[So] Source:Indian Heart J;69(2):277-281, 2017 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0019-4832
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The various studies have examined the relationship between FTO gene expression and macronutrients levels. In order to obtain better viewpoint from this interactions, all of existing studies were reviewed systematically. All published papers have been obtained and reviewed using standard and sensitive keywords from databases such as CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane, from 1990 to 2016. The results indicated that all of 6 studies that met the inclusion criteria (from a total of 428 published article) found FTO gene expression changes at short-term follow-ups. Four of six studies found an increased FTO gene expression after calorie restriction, while two of them indicated decreased FTO gene expression. The effect of protein, carbohydrate and fat were separately assessed and suggested by all of six studies. In Conclusion, The level of FTO gene expression in hypothalamus is related to macronutrients levels. Future research should evaluate the long-term impact of dietary interventions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/genetics
Cardiovascular Diseases
Food
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hypothalamus/metabolism
Obesity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/biosynthesis
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology
Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics
Humans
Obesity/complications
Obesity/genetics
Obesity/metabolism
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 1.14.11.33 (Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO); EC 1.14.11.33 (FTO protein, human)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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