Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Idiopathic and Interstitial and Pneumonias [Words]
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[PMID]: 29507864
[Au] Autor:Yamashita M; Saito R; Yasuhira S; Fukuda Y; Sasamo H; Sugai T; Yamauchi K; Maemondo M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Distinct Profiles of CD163-Positive Macrophages in Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias.
[So] Source:J Immunol Res;2018:1436236, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2314-7156
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The types of cells most significantly linked to individual subtypes of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) remain unclear. Few studies have examined CD163 macrophages in IIPs. Objective: We retrospectively aimed to immunohistochemically characterize the CD163 macrophages in IIPs. Methods: Paraffin-embedded lung tissue samples were obtained from 47 patients with IIPs, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), and 12 normal controls were immunohistochemically analyzed, using primary antibodies against CD68 and CD163 as indicators of pan and M2 macrophages, respectively. Results: CD68 macrophage density was significantly increased in the 3 subtypes of IIPs relative to that in the control group, although no difference was detected within the different IIPs. CD163 macrophage density was significantly increased in NSIP and COP samples relative to that in IPF samples. The density ratio of CD163 macrophages to CD68 macrophages was significantly decreased in IPF/UIP samples relative to that in the others, while the densities in NSIP and COP were significantly higher than those in control cases. Conclusion: CD163 macrophages show distinct profiles among IIPs, and the standardized numerical density is decreased in IPF cases that have poor prognoses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2018/1436236

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[PMID]: 29420550
[Au] Autor:Dhooria S; Agarwal R; Sehgal IS; Prasad KT; Garg M; Bal A; Aggarwal AN; Behera D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Spectrum of interstitial lung diseases at a tertiary center in a developing country: A study of 803 subjects.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191938, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The spectrum of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) have mainly been reported from the developed countries; data from developing countries is sparse and conflicting. The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of various ILDs from a developing country. METHODS: This is an analysis of prospectively collected clinical, radiological and histological data of consecutive subjects (age >12 years) with ILDs from a single tertiary care medical center. The diagnosis of the specific subtype of ILD was made according to standard criteria for various ILDs. RESULTS: A total of 803 subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 50.2% women) were enrolled between March 2015 to February 2017 of which 566 (70.5%) were diagnosed during the study period (incident cases). Sarcoidosis (42.2%), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, 21.2%), connective tissue disease (CTD)-related ILDs (12.7%), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (10.7%), and non-IPF idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (9.2%) were the most common ILDs. The spectrum of ILDs was not significantly different (p = 0.87) between incident and prevalent cases. A histopathological specimen was obtained in 49.9% of the subjects yielding a histologically confirmed diagnosis in 40.6%. A diagnostic procedure was not performed in 402 subjects; the most common reasons were presence of definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on high resolution computed tomography and patients' unwillingness to undergo the procedure. CONCLUSION: Sarcoidosis, IPF and CTD-ILDs were the most common ILDs seen at a tertiary center in northern India similar to the spectrum reported from developed countries. More studies are required from developing countries to ascertain the spectrum of ILDs in different geographic locales.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191938

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[PMID]: 29289262
[Au] Autor:Chen F; Li S; Wang T; Shi J; Wang G
[Ad] Address:Department of Rheumatology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Yinghua East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Heterogeneity of Interstitial Lung Disease in Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis Patients With or Without Specific Autoantibodies.
[So] Source:Am J Med Sci;355(1):48-53, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2990
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the heterogeneity of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis (PM/DM) according to serological type. METHODS: A total of 182 patients with PM/DM-ILD were observed retrospectively. Antiaminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) and antimelanoma differentiation-associated gene5 (MDA5) antibodies were screened using immunoblotting approach. The patients with ILD were divided into 3 groups: MDA5 (with anti-MDA5 antibody), ARS (with anti-ARS antibody) and MSN (without anti-MDA5 or anti-ARS antibody) group. Pulmonary features, treatment responses and prognoses were compared among the groups. RESULTS: A higher percentage of rapidly progressive ILD (RP-ILD) occurrences (55.8% versus 25% versus 16.9%, P < 0.001) was observed in the MDA5 group compared to ARS and MSN groups. The MSN group experienced lower dyspnea (48.2% versus 79% versus 71.4%, P = 0.001) and fever (18.1% versus 39.5% versus 37.5%, P = 0.01) frequencies compared to MDA5 and ARS groups. Response to 6-month treatment among 95 patients showed highest deterioration ratio (70%, P = 0.001) of ILD in the MDA5 group. Additionally, the highest frequency of ILD improvement (60%, P = 0.04) was observed in the ARS group. During the observation period, 24 patients died of respiratory failure. The 5-year survival rates were significantly lower in MDA5 group (50.2%) compared to ARS group (97.7%) or the MSN group (91.4%) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: MDA5-ILD was associated with severe pulmonary manifestations, poor response to treatment and aggravated prognosis. The ARS-ILD group had favorable treatment response and prognosis. MSN-ILD patients had relatively worse treatment response and prognosis compared to the ARS group, even though they expressed milder pulmonary manifestation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Autoantibodies/blood
Dermatomyositis/blood
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/blood
Polymyositis/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
China/epidemiology
Dermatomyositis/diagnosis
Dermatomyositis/mortality
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymyositis/diagnosis
Polymyositis/mortality
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate/trends
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Autoantibodies)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180101
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29486761
[Au] Autor:Takahashi Y; Saito A; Chiba H; Kuronuma K; Ikeda K; Kobayashi T; Ariki S; Takahashi M; Sasaki Y; Takahashi H
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, S1W16 Chuoku, Sapporo, 060-8543, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Impaired diversity of the lung microbiome predicts progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
[So] Source:Respir Res;19(1):34, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1465-993X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most frequent and severe form of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Although IPF has not been thought to be associated with bacterial communities, recent papers reported the possible role of microbiome composition in IPF. The roles of microbiomes in respiratory functions and as clinical biomarkers for IPF remain unknown. In this study, we aim to identify the relationship between the microbial environment in the lung and clinical findings. METHODS: Thirty-four subjects diagnosed with IPF were included in this analysis. The 16S rDNA was purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained at the time of diagnosis and analyzed using next-generation sequencing techniques to characterize the bacterial communities. Furthermore, microbiomes from mice with bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis were analyzed. RESULTS: The most prevalent lung phyla were Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Decreased microbial diversity was found in patients with low forced vital capacity (FVC) and early mortality. Additionally, the diversity and relative abundance of Firmicutes, Streptococcaceae, and Veillonellaceae were significantly associated with FVC, 6-min walk distance, and serum surfactant protein D. Bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis resulted in decrease of diversity and alteration of microbiota in PCoA analysis. These results support the observations in human specimens. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified relationships between specific taxa in BALF and clinical findings, which were also supported by experiments in a mouse model. Our data suggest the possibility that loss of microbial diversity is associated with disease activities of IPF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12931-018-0736-9

  5 / 4743 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28461123
[Au] Autor:Tanizawa K; Handa T; Nakashima R; Kubo T; Hosono Y; Watanabe K; Aihara K; Ikezoe K; Sokai A; Nakatsuka Y; Taguchi Y; Hatta K; Noma S; Kobashi Y; Yoshizawa A; Oga T; Hirai T; Chin K; Nagai S; Izumi T; Mimori T; Mishima M
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The long-term outcome of interstitial lung disease with anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies.
[So] Source:Respir Med;127:57-64, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-3064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Anti-aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase antibodies (anti-ARS) are a group of myositis-specific autoantibodies that are detected in the sera of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and also in those of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias without any connective tissue disease (CTD), including PM/DM. Although we reported the clinical characteristics of interstitial lung disease with anti-ARS antibodies (ARS-ILD) with and without PM/DM, the long-term prognosis of ARS-ILD remains undetermined. As our previous studies revealed that ARS-ILD without PM/DM was similar to CTD-associated ILD, and that ARS-ILD with PM/DM was radiologically suggestive of a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pathological pattern, we hypothesized that the prognosis of ARS-ILD might be distinct from that of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) without anti-ARS. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the long-term outcome of ARS-ILD with and without PM/DM and compare it to that of IPF. METHODS: A two-center retrospective study was conducted. The study population comprised 36 patients with ARS-ILD (8 with PM, 12 with DM, and 16 without myositis throughout the course), 100 patients with IPF without anti-ARS, and 7 patients with NSIP without anti-ARS. The presence of anti-ARS was determined by RNA immunoprecipitation using the sera obtained at the time of diagnosis before specific treatment. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During the observational period (median 49 months; range, 1-114 months), 7 patients with ARS-ILD (19%; 3 with PM, 1 with DM, and 3 without PM/DM) and 51 patients with IPF (51%) died. Patients with ARS-ILD had better overall survival than those with IPF (log-rank test, P < 0.001) and similar survival compared to those with NSIP (log-rank test, P = 0.59). The prognosis for patients with ARS-ILD was similar between those with and without myositis (log-rank test, P = 0.91). At the median follow-up time of 76.5 months, 14 of the 36 patients with ARS-ILD had deteriorated. Both a decline in forced vital capacity or an initiation of long-term oxygen therapy during the course (odds ratio [OR], 5.34) and acute exacerbation (OR, 28.4) significantly increased the mortality risk. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term outcome of ARS-ILD was significantly better than that of IPF regardless of the presence or absence of myositis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases/immunology
Autoantibodies/blood
Dermatomyositis/complications
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/immunology
Myositis/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Autoantibodies/immunology
Connective Tissue Diseases/complications
Connective Tissue Diseases/diagnosis
Connective Tissue Diseases/immunology
Connective Tissue Diseases/mortality
Dermatomyositis/immunology
Dermatomyositis/mortality
Female
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging
Lung Diseases, Interstitial/mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Myositis/mortality
Observational Studies as Topic
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prognosis
RNA/immunology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Vital Capacity/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Autoantibodies); 63231-63-0 (RNA); EC 6.1.1.- (Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 4743 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28449678
[Au] Autor:Justet A; Laurent-Bellue A; Thabut G; Dieudonné A; Debray MP; Borie R; Aubier M; Lebtahi R; Crestani B
[Ad] Address:APHP, Hôpital Bichat, Service de Pneumologie A, DHU FIRE, Centre de compétence des maladies pulmonaires rares, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018, Paris, France. aurelienjustet@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:[ F]FDG PET/CT predicts progression-free survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
[So] Source:Respir Res;18(1):74, 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:1465-993X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease characterized by an unpredictable course. Prognostic markers and disease activity markers are needed. The purpose of this single-center retrospective study was to evaluate the prognostic value of lung fluorodeoxyglucose ([ F]-FDG) uptake assessed by standardized uptake value (SUV), metabolic lung volume (MLV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in patients with IPF. METHODS: We included 27 IPF patients (IPF group) and 15 patients with a gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumor without thoracic involvement (control group). We quantified lung SUV mean and SUV max, MLV and TLG and assessed clinical data, high-resolution CT (HRCT) fibrosis and ground-glass score; lung function; gender, age, physiology (GAP) stage at inclusion and during follow-up; and survival. RESULTS: Lung SUV mean and SUV max were higher in IPF patients than controls (p <0.00001). For patients with IPF, SUV mean, SUV max, MLV and TLG were correlated with severity of lung involvement as measured by a decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and increased GAP score. In a univariate and in a multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model, risk of death was increased although not significantly with high SUV mean. On univariate analysis, risk of death was significantly associated with high TLG and MLV, which disappeared after adjustment functional variables or GAP index. Increased MLV and TLG were independent predictors of death or disease progression during the 12 months after PET scan completion (for every 100-point increase in TLG, hazard ratio [HR]: 1.11 (95% CI 1.06; 1.36), p = 0.003; for every 100-point increase in MLV, HR: 1.20 (1.04; 1.19), p = 0.002). On multivariable analysis including TLG or MLV with age, FVC, and DLCO or GAP index, TLG and MLV remained associated with progression-free survival (HR: 1.1 [1.03; 1.22], p = 0.01; and 1.13 [1.0; 1.2], p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: FDG lung uptake may be a marker of IPF severity and predict progression-free survival for patients with IPF.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/mortality
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/statistics & numerical data
Smoking/mortality
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Comorbidity
Disease-Free Survival
France/epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Radiopharmaceuticals
Reproducibility of Results
Risk Factors
Sensitivity and Specificity
Survival Rate
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Radiopharmaceuticals); 0Z5B2CJX4D (Fluorodeoxyglucose F18)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12931-017-0556-3

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[PMID]: 29195901
[Au] Autor:Chen H; Chen Q; Jiang CM; Shi GY; Sui BW; Zhang W; Yang LZ; Li ZY; Liu L; Su YM; Zhao WC; Sun HQ; Li ZZ; Fu Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, China; China International Science and Technology Cooperation base of Child development and Critical Disorders, China; Chongqing Engineeri
[Ti] Title:Triptolide suppresses paraquat induced idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting TGFB1-dependent epithelial mesenchymal transition.
[So] Source:Toxicol Lett;284:1-9, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3169
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and tumor are highly similar to abnormal cell proliferation that damages the body. This malignant cell evolution in a stressful environment closely resembles that of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). As a popular EMT-inducing factor, TGFß plays an important role in the progression of multiple diseases. However, the drugs that target TGFB1 are limited. In this study, we found that triptolide (TPL), a Chinese medicine extract, exerts an anti-lung fibrosis effect by inhibiting the EMT of lung epithelial cells. In addition, triptolide directly binds to TGFß and subsequently increase E-cadherin expression and decrease vimentin expression. In in vivo studies, TPL improves the survival state and inhibits lung fibrosis in mice. In summary, this study revealed the potential therapeutic effect of paraquat induced TPL in lung fibrosis by regulating TGFß-dependent EMT progression.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diterpenes/therapeutic use
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/prevention & control
Paraquat/toxicity
Phenanthrenes/therapeutic use
Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cell Line
Cell Movement/drug effects
Disease Models, Animal
Diterpenes/pharmacology
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology
Epithelial Cells/drug effects
Epithelial Cells/metabolism
Epithelial Cells/pathology
Epoxy Compounds/pharmacology
Epoxy Compounds/therapeutic use
Humans
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology
Lung/drug effects
Lung/metabolism
Lung/pathology
Mice
Molecular Docking Simulation
Phenanthrenes/pharmacology
Protein Binding
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Diterpenes); 0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 0 (Epoxy Compounds); 0 (Phenanthrenes); 0 (Tgfb1 protein, mouse); 0 (Transforming Growth Factor beta1); 19ALD1S53J (triptolide); PLG39H7695 (Paraquat)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171203
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 4743 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29192829
[Au] Autor:Liu G; Thannickal VJ
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Medicine University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, Alabama.
[Ti] Title:The Lung Likes the Little Fella miR-29.
[So] Source:Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol;57(6):637-638, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1535-4989
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypertension, Pulmonary/metabolism
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism
Lung Neoplasms/metabolism
Lung/metabolism
MicroRNAs/metabolism
RNA, Neoplasm/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary/genetics
Hypertension, Pulmonary/pathology
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology
Lung/pathology
Lung Neoplasms/genetics
Lung Neoplasms/pathology
MicroRNAs/genetics
RNA, Neoplasm/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (MIRN29 microRNA, human); 0 (MicroRNAs); 0 (RNA, Neoplasm)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1165/rcmb.2017-0266ED

  9 / 4743 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29192828
[Au] Autor:Randell SH; Zeldin DC
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Cell Biology and Physiology.
[Ti] Title:A Slippery Cause of a Slimy Problem: Mucin Induction by an Esterified Lipid.
[So] Source:Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol;57(6):633-634, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1535-4989
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthma/metabolism
Bronchitis, Chronic/metabolism
Cystic Fibrosis/metabolism
Goblet Cells/metabolism
Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids/metabolism
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism
Mucins/biosynthesis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Asthma/pathology
Bronchitis, Chronic/pathology
Cystic Fibrosis/pathology
Goblet Cells/pathology
Humans
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids); 0 (Mucins); 73945-47-8 (15-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1165/rcmb.2017-0275ED

  10 / 4743 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29434143
[Au] Autor:Fujita T; Hiroishi T; Shikano K; Yanagisawa A; Hayama N; Amano H; Nakamura M; Hirano S; Tabeta H; Nakamura S
[Ad] Address:Department of Respirology, Funabashi Municipal Medical Center, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The Safety and Efficacy of Treatment with Nab-Paclitaxel and Carboplatin for Patients with Advanced Squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Concurrent with Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background Although lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounts for 20%-30% of lung cancer cases, new treatment options are limited. The CA031 study showed that nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel (nab-PTX) plus carboplatin produced a significantly higher overall response rate (41%) than solvent-based paclitaxel plus carboplatin in patients with lung SCC. However, the safety and efficacy of combination chemotherapy of nab-PTX and carboplatin has not yet been established for patients with concurrent lung SCC and idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy profiles of nab-PTX and carboplatin in patients with lung SCC and concurrent IIPs. Methods Eight patients with inoperable-stage lung SCC and IIPs were treated with nab-PTX plus carboplatin in a first-line setting between June 2013 and December 2016. One of the eight was a woman, and the median age was 77 (range=72-80) years. Their clinical outcomes, including chemotherapy-associated acute exacerbation of IIPs, were retrospectively investigated. Results The overall response rate was 50%, the median progression-free survival time was 5.6 months, and the median overall survival time was 8.1 months. No patients experienced chemotherapy-related exacerbation of IIPs in the first-line treatment with nab-PTX plus carboplatin. However, IIPs worsened in two of four patients who received second-line chemotherapy. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy of nab-PTX and carboplatin may be an effective and safe treatment option for patients with inoperable lung SCC with IIPs. To confirm this, a large-scale prospective study is needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.0404-17


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