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Search on : Iliotibial and Band and Syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 29361639
[Au] Autor:Inoue H; Hara K; Arai Y; Nakagawa S; Kan H; Hino M; Fujiwara H; Kubo T
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Outcome of Low-Invasive Local Split-Thickness Lengthening for Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome.
[So] Source:Int J Sports Med;39(3):232-236, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1439-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Conventional surgical methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) may affect the iliotibial band (ITB), delaying return to sports activities or impeding performance. We have developed a minimally invasive method. This study retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of this procedure in individuals with ITBFS. This study included 34 knees of 31 individuals. Surgery involved lengthening the central part of the ITB by splitting it into a superficial and a deep layer, maintaining the anterior and posterior fibers immediately above the lateral epicondyle. Outcomes included time to resume sports activity, personal best times to run a 5000-m race before and after surgery, and 2-month post-surgery muscle strengths. The mean postoperative time to return to competition was 5.8 weeks. Personal best times of 5000-m race improved in 13 of 17 runners. Two months post-surgery, the mean extensor muscle strengths on the healthy and affected sides did not significantly differ nor did the flexor muscle strengths. In ITBFS, the ITB itself is normal. Lengthening the limited region of the ITB immediately above the lateral femoral epicondyle removes the cause of ITBFS, with a reduction in inflammation. This technique resulted in early return to competition without degrading performance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0043-122152

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[PMID]: 29373059
[Au] Autor:Stickley CD; Presuto MM; Radzak KN; Bourbeau CM; Hetzler RK
[Ad] Address:Biomechanics & Gait Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Science, University of Hawai'i-Manoa, Honolulu.
[Ti] Title:Dynamic Varus and the Development of Iliotibial Band Syndrome.
[So] Source:J Athl Train;53(2):128-134, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1938-162X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Although the risk of osteoarthritis development after acute knee injury has been widely studied, the long-term consequences of knee overuse injury are not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To identify the relationship between gait-related risk factors associated with osteoarthritis and the development of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) in members of a single University Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-eight cadets undergoing standardized physical fitness training. INTERVENTION(S): Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics (240 Hz) and kinetics (960 Hz) were collected for 3 bilateral trials during shod running at 4.0 m/s ± 10%. Injury tracking was conducted for 7 months of training. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Biomechanical variables, including varus thrust and knee-adduction moment, were compared between the injured and control groups. RESULTS: Twenty-six cadets with no history of overuse injury served as the control group, whereas 6 cadets (7 limbs) who developed ITBS that required them to modify their training program or seek medical care (or both) served as the injured group. Maximum varus velocity was higher ( P = .006) and occurred sooner during stance ( P = .04) in the injured group than in the control group, indicating greater varus thrust. Maximum knee-varus angle and maximum knee-adduction moment were higher ( P = .02 and P = .002, respectively) and vertical stiffness was lower ( P = .03) in the injured group. CONCLUSIONS: Measures of dynamic varus stability appeared to be altered in individuals who developed ITBS. Biomechanical knee variables previously identified as increasing the risk for knee osteoarthritis were also associated with the development of ITBS in healthy adults.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4085/1062-6050-122-16

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[PMID]: 28967055
[Au] Autor:Ebert JR; Bucher TA; Mullan CJ; Janes GC
[Ad] Address:School of Human Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth - Australia.
[Ti] Title:Clinical and functional outcomes after augmented hip abductor tendon repair.
[So] Source:Hip Int;:0, 2017 Sep 21.
[Is] ISSN:1724-6067
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Hip abductor tendon (HAT) tearing is commonly implicated in greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Surgical studies are often reported in small cohorts and with limited information on functional improvement. This study reports the clinical and functional outcomes after HAT repair. METHODS: 112 patients with symptomatic HAT tears, diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging, underwent open bursectomy, V-Y lengthening of the iliotibial band, debridement of the diseased tendon, decortication of the trochanteric foot-plate and reattachment of the tendon with suture anchors, augmented with a LARS ligament through a trans-osseous tunnel. Patients were evaluated pre-surgery and at 3, 6 and 12 months post-surgery using the Harris (HHS) and Oxford (OHS) Hip Scores, SF-12, hip range of motion, 6-minute walk and 30-second single leg stance tests. Maximal isometric hip abduction strength (HAS) was assessed and limb symmetry indices (LSIs) were calculated between the operated and non-operated limbs. Patient satisfaction and perceived global rating of change (GRC) was evaluated. Analysis of variance evaluated improvement over time. RESULTS: There was a significant improvement (p<0.05) in all clinical and functional measures. HAS significantly improved over time (p<0.002) and all LSIs were >85% at 12 months. At 12 months, a mean GRC score of 3.5 (range -1 to 5) was reported, while 96% of patients were satisfied with their surgical outcome. There was a 2.7% (n = 3) failure rate at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: HAT reconstruction, augmented with a synthetic ligament, demonstrated significantly improved clinical and functional outcomes, high levels of patient satisfaction and a low failure rate to 12 months post-surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 28893388
[Au] Autor:De Maeseneer M; Wuertzer S; de Mey J; Shahabpour M
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussel, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:The imaging findings of impingement syndromes of the lower limb.
[So] Source:Clin Radiol;72(12):1014-1024, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1365-229X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this article we provide an overview of impingement syndromes of the lower limb. At the level of the hip, femoroacetabular and ischiofemoral impingement are recognised. At the level of the knee, we discuss Hoffa's fat pad impingement, suprapatellar fat pad impingement, pericruciate impingement, and iliotibial band syndrome. The impingement syndromes associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair and intercondylar osteophytes are also illustrated. Most impingement syndromes are described at the level of the ankle. These include, anterior, anterolateral, posterior, anteromedial, posterior, and posterolateral impingement. For these conditions, we describe the best technique and expected imaging findings. It should be kept in mind that many of these findings have been observed in the asymptomatic population. Impingement is essentially a clinical diagnosis and imaging findings should be considered as supportive elements for this clinical diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171118
[Lr] Last revision date:171118
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28809635
[Au] Autor:Zeman P; Rafi M; Skala P; Zeman J; Matejka J; Pavelka T
[Ad] Address:Klinika ortopedie a traumatologie pohybového ústrojí Lékarské fakulty Univerzity Karlovy a Fakultní nemocnice v Plzni.
[Ti] Title:Výsledky endoskopické terapie bolestivého syndromu velkého trochanteru. [Clinical Results of Endoscopic Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome].
[So] Source:Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech;84(3):168-174, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0001-5415
[Cp] Country of publication:Czech Republic
[La] Language:cze
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This retrospective study aims to present short-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic treatment of patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The evaluated study population was composed of a total of 19 patients (16 women, 3 men) with the mean age of 47 years (19-63 years). In twelve cases the right hip joint was affected, in the remaining seven cases it was the left side. The retrospective evaluation was carried out only in patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome caused by independent chronic trochanteric bursitis without the presence of m. gluteus medius tear not responding to at least 3 months of conservative treatment. In patients from the followed-up study population, endoscopic trochanteric bursectomy was performed alone or in combination with iliotibial band release. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and with a minimum follow-up period of 1 year after the surgery (mean 16 months). The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for assessment of pain and WOMAC (Western Ontario MacMaster) score were used. In both the evaluated criteria (VAS and WOMAC score) preoperative and postoperative results were compared. Moreover, duration of surgery and presence of postoperative complications were assessed. Statistical evaluation of clinical results was carried out by an independent statistician. In order to compare the parameter of WOMAC score and VAS pre- and post-operatively the Mann-Whitney Exact Test was used. The statistical significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS The preoperative VAS score ranged 5-9 (mean 7.6) and the postoperative VAS ranged 0-5 (mean 2.3). The WOMAC score ranged 56.3-69.7 (mean 64.2) preoperatively and 79.8-98.3 (mean 89.7) postoperatively. When both the evaluated parameters of VAS and WOMAC score were compared in time, a statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) was achieved postoperatively. The mean duration of surgical procedure was 68 minutes. Moreover, in peritrochanteric space apart from chronic bursitis also another pathology was found in a total of 14 cases (74%). In six cases (32%) it was a mild degeneration of m. gluteus medius (treated only with debridement) and in eight patients who underwent surgery (42%) the dorsal third of tractus iliotibialis was hypertrophic and protruding into bursa (treated with an incision of the hypertrophied part of the band). No serious neurovascular or thromboembolic complications were recorded. Only minor postoperative complications in a total of 7 patients who underwent surgery (37%) occurred. DISCUSSION There are lots of studies in literature presenting the results of endoscopic treatment of GTPS either using an independent trochanteric bursectomy or its combination with iliotibial band release. In our study we succeeded in achieving similar clinical results as those achieved by the other authors engaged in this area. CONCLUSIONS It has been proven in this retrospective study that the technique of endoscopic trochanteric bursectomy in patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome yields statistically significant improvement of clinical results with the concurrent minimum incidence of postoperative complications. Key words: greater trochanteric pain syndrome, peritrochanteric space, recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, hip arthroscopy, endoscopic trochanteric bursectomy, iliotibial band release.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170815
[Lr] Last revision date:170815
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28706832
[Au] Autor:Pierce TP; Mease SJ; Issa K; Festa A; McInerney VK; Scillia AJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Iliotibial Band Lengthening: An Arthroscopic Surgical Technique.
[So] Source:Arthrosc Tech;6(3):e785-e789, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2212-6287
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Iliotibial (IT) band syndrome is a common cause of lateral knee pain in runners and cyclists. Many can be treated nonoperatively; however, some may require surgical lengthening of their IT band to achieve optimal pain relief and a return to preinjury level of activity. Several studies have been published detailing surgical lengthening procedures and satisfactory outcomes after these procedures. However, it is important to continue to improve on and optimize outcomes. We present our arthroscopic IT band-lengthening procedure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170717
[Lr] Last revision date:170717
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.eats.2017.02.010

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[PMID]: 28630835
[Au] Autor:Rathore S; Quadri V; Tapadia S; Krishnaiah K; Krishna VPN
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Secunderabad, Telangana, India.
[Ti] Title:Intra-articular Fibroma of Tendon Sheath in Knee Joint Associated with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome: Rare Occurrence in a Teenage Girl.
[So] Source:J Orthop Case Rep;7(1):28-31, 2017 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2250-0685
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion with friction syndrome has rarely been reported. Among such nodular lesions around knee, fibroma of tendon sheath (FTS) is a rare occurrence. All the more intra-articular occurrence is extremely rare. CASE REPORT: A 16-year-old female presented with recurrent pain and movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as rare intra-articular FTS on the basis of histopathology findings. CONCLUSION: When nodular lesions around knee are detected on magnetic resonance imaging, a FTS could be included in the differential diagnosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of ITB friction syndrome should be revised in view of such rare presentations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.13107/jocr.2250-0685.674

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[PMID]: 28618309
[Au] Autor:Hafer JF; Brown AM; Boyer KA
[Ad] Address:Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA. Electronic address: jhafer@kin.umass.edu.
[Ti] Title:Exertion and pain do not alter coordination variability in runners with iliotibial band syndrome.
[So] Source:Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon);47:73-78, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1271
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Iliotibial band syndrome is a common overuse running injury which results in altered mechanics. While injuries alter discrete mechanics, they may also cause a change in coordination variability, the stride-to-stride organization of runners' movement patterns. Uninjured and injured runners may experience a change in coordination variability during a run to exertion due to fatigue, pain, or a combination of these factors. The aim of the current study was to determine if runners with iliotibial band syndrome and uninjured runners display different segment coordination variability across the course of a run to exertion. METHODS: 3D kinematics were collected as 13 uninjured runners and 12 runners with iliotibial band syndrome ran on a treadmill. A modified vector coding technique was used to calculate coordination variability during stance for segment couples of interest. Coordination variability was compared between uninjured and injured runners at the beginning and end of the run. The influence of pain on coordination variability was also examined. FINDINGS: There were no differences in coordination variability at the beginning or end of the run between uninjured runners and those with iliotibial band syndrome. The change in coordination variability due to the run was not different between uninjured runners, injured runners who experienced no change in pain, and injured runners who did experience a change in pain. INTERPRETATION: Runners do not constrain the patterns of segment motion they use in response to exertion nor does it appear that occurrence of pain during running results in a differential change in coordination variability.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170728
[Lr] Last revision date:170728
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28481756
[Au] Autor:Abdelshahed D; Neuman S; Oh-Park M
[Ad] Address:From the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Newark, New Jersey (DA, MO-P); Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, New Jersey (DA, MO-P); Sea Girt Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Associates, LLC, Sea Girt, New Jersey (SN); and Kessler Foundation, West Orange, New Jersey (MO-P).
[Ti] Title:Dynamic Change in Ultrasonographic Findings in Iliotibial Band Syndrome After Running.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Med Rehabil;, 2017 May 05.
[Is] ISSN:1537-7385
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170508
[Lr] Last revision date:170508
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PHM.0000000000000760

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[PMID]: 28238018
[Au] Autor:Flato R; Passanante GJ; Skalski MR; Patel DB; White EA; Matcuk GR
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite L1600, Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA.
[Ti] Title:The iliotibial tract: imaging, anatomy, injuries, and other pathology.
[So] Source:Skeletal Radiol;46(5):605-622, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2161
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The iliotibial tract, also known as Maissiat's band or the iliotibial band, and its associated muscles function to extend, abduct, and laterally rotate the hip, as well as aid in the stabilization of the knee. A select group of associated injuries and pathologies of the iliotibial tract are seen as sequela of repetitive stress and direct trauma. This article intends to educate the radiologist, orthopedist, and other clinicians about iliotibial tract anatomy and function and the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and imaging findings of associated pathologies. Specifically, this article will review proximal iliotibial band syndrome, Morel-Lavallée lesions, external snapping hip syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome and bursitis, traumatic tears, iliotibial insertional tendinosis and peritendonitis, avulsion fractures at Gerdy's tubercle, and Segond fractures. The clinical management of these pathologies will also be discussed in brief.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fascia Lata/diagnostic imaging
Fascia Lata/pathology
Hip Injuries/diagnostic imaging
Knee Injuries/diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
Radiography/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Fascia Lata/anatomy & histology
Fascia Lata/injuries
Hip Injuries/pathology
Hip Joint/anatomy & histology
Hip Joint/diagnostic imaging
Hip Joint/pathology
Humans
Iliotibial Band Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
Iliotibial Band Syndrome/pathology
Knee Injuries/pathology
Knee Joint/diagnostic imaging
Knee Joint/pathology
Thigh/anatomy & histology
Thigh/diagnostic imaging
Thigh/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171012
[Lr] Last revision date:171012
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00256-017-2604-y


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