Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Indigo and Carmine [Words]
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[PMID]: 29504086
[Au] Autor:Ogawa R; Nishikawa J; Hideura E; Goto A; Koto Y; Ito S; Unno M; Yamaoka Y; Kawasato R; Hashimoto S; Okamoto T; Ogihara H; Hamamoto Y; Sakaida I
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Objective Assessment of the Utility of Chromoendoscopy with a Support Vector Machine.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Cancer;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1941-6636
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The utility of chromoendoscopy for early gastric cancer (GC) was determined by machine learning using data of color differences. METHODS: Eighteen histopathologically confirmed early GC lesions were examined. We prepared images from white light endoscopy (WL), indigo carmine (Indigo), and acetic acid-indigo carmine chromoendoscopy (AIM). A border between cancerous and non-cancerous areas on endoscopic images was established from post-treatment pathological findings, and 2000 pixels with equivalent luminance values were randomly extracted from each image of cancerous and non-cancerous areas. Each pixel was represented as a three-dimensional vector with RGB values and defined as a sample. We evaluated the Mahalanobis distance using RGB values, indicative of color differences between cancerous and non-cancerous areas. We then conducted diagnosis test using a support vector machine (SVM) for each image. SVM was trained using the 100 training samples per class and determined which area each of 1900 test samples per class came from. RESULTS: The means of the Mahalanobis distances for WL, Indigo, and AIM were 1.52, 1.32, and 2.53, respectively and there were no significant differences in the three modalities. Diagnosability per endoscopy technique was assessed using the F1 measure. The means of F1 measures for WL, Indigo, and AIM were 0.636, 0.618, and 0.687, respectively. AIM images were better than WL and Indigo images for the diagnosis of GC. CONCLUSION: Objective assessment by SVM found AIM to be suitable for diagnosis of early GC based on color differences.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12029-018-0083-6

  2 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29172683
[Au] Autor:Shimamura Y; Sasaki S; Shimohira M; Ogino H; Yuki D; Nakamae K; Hara M; Shibamoto Y
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences , Nagoya , Japan.
[Ti] Title:New technique of percutaneous CT fluoroscopy-guided marking before video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for small lung lesions: feasibility of using a 25-gauge needle without local anaesthesia.
[So] Source:Br J Radiol;91(1083):20170692, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1748-880X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility of CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous marking using a 25-gauge needle and indigo carmine before video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for small lung lesions. METHODS: 21 patients, 14 males and 7 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 40-79), underwent CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous VATS marking using a 25-gauge, 70-mm needle and 1.5-ml indigo carmine. The mean diameter of the lung lesions was 14 mm (range, 6-27). We evaluated the technical success rate, surgical success rate and complications related to this procedure by reviewing medical records and images. Technical success was defined as completion of this procedure. Surgical success was defined as resection of the target lesion with negative margins on pathological examination after VATS. Complications that required advanced levels of care were classified as major complications, and the remaining complications were considered minor. RESULTS: The technical success rate was 100%. In all cases, VATS was successfully performed as planned, and the target lesion was resected with negative margins on pathological examination after VATS. Thus, the surgical success rate was 100%. Mild pneumothorax was found in two cases, but further treatment was not required. The minor complication rate was 9.5% (2/21), and major complication rate was 0%. Only two patients (9.5%) complained of slight pain upon puncture, but local anaesthesia was not required. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous CT fluoroscopy-guided VATS marking using a 25-gauge needle without local anaesthesia appears feasible and safe. Advances in knowledge: This technique expands a possibility of the CT-guided marking.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenocarcinoma/surgery
Lung Neoplasms/surgery
Needles
Radiography, Interventional/methods
Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Coloring Agents
Feasibility Studies
Female
Fluoroscopy
Humans
Indigo Carmine
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Coloring Agents); D3741U8K7L (Indigo Carmine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1259/bjr.20170692

  3 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29217322
[Au] Autor:Okawada M; Murakami H; Tanaka N; Ogasawara Y; Lane GJ; Okazaki T; Yanai T; Urao M; Yamataka A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric General and Urogenital Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: manabu-o@juntendo.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Incidence of ureterovesical obstruction and Cohen antireflux surgery after Deflux® treatment for vesicoureteric reflux.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Surg;53(2):310-312, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5037
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of ureteric obstruction (UB) and requirement for Cohen antireflux surgery (CAS) after Deflux treatment (DT) for vesicoureteric reflux (VUR). METHODS: Between 2011 and 2017, 494 ureters (VUR severity ≤ grade III: N=291 or >grade IV: N=203) were treated by DT at a mean age of 4.5 (range: 0.2-24) years. Epidural Catheter Assistance (ECA) was used to exclude UB by injecting diluted indigo carmine solution (1-3mL) into an epidural catheter inserted into a ureter after DT and confirming dye flow within 15min. ECA+: N=181 ureters; ECA-: N=313 ureters. RESULTS: In ECA+, UB was detected in 5/181 (2.7%) ureters (grade II: N=1, III: N=3, and IV: N=1) treated by leaving the ECA catheter in situ overnight (N=4) or double J stent (DJS) insertion for 1month (N=2). After mean follow-up of 1.9years, one grade III DJS case has residual grade II VUR. In ECA-, 3/313 (0.9%) cases developed UB. One resolved, and one required DJS. CAS was required for 17/494 (3.4%) ureters and hindered by DT in 5/17 (29.4%) ureters. All are sequelae-free after mean follow-up of 1.8years. CONCLUSIONS: UB may be more frequent than reported (3.3% versus 0.6%-1.8%). ECA identifies potential UB. TYPE OF STUDY: Treatment study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29383606
[Au] Autor:Han SJ; Jung Y; Cho YS; Chung IK; Kim JY; Eun JY; Lee SH; Ko GB; Lee TH; Park SH; Cho HD; Kim SJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, 23-20 Bongmyung-Dong, Cheonan, Choongnam, 330-721, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Effectiveness of Submucosal Injection with Indigo Carmine Mixed Solution for Colon Endoscopic Mucosal Resection.
[So] Source:Dig Dis Sci;63(3):775-780, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2568
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: Submucosal injection with indigo carmine mixed solution can improve the delineation of colorectal neoplasia during endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of submucosal injection with indigo carmine mixed solution during EMR of colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, controlled study of a total of 212 neoplastic colon polyps (5-20 mm) subjected to EMR in a single tertiary university hospital. The patients were randomized into two groups according to whether or not indigo carmine mixed solution was used, and the complete resection rate (CRR) after EMR was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 212 neoplastic polyps (normal saline group, 115; indigo carmine group, 97) were successfully removed by EMR. There was no significant difference in the CRR (92.8 vs. 89.6%, p = 0.414) or macroscopic delineation (86.0 vs. 93.8%, p = 0.118) between the two groups. In a separate analysis of sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSAs/Ps), macroscopic delineation was better in the indigo carmine group than the normal saline group (87.5 vs. 53.8%), albeit not significantly (p = 0.103). In univariate analyses, the CRR was significantly related to polyp location, polyp morphology, macroscopic delineation, and pathologic findings. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, macroscopic delineation (odds ratio (OR), 7.616, p = 0.001) and polyp pathology (OR, 8.621; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with the CRR. CONCLUSIONS: Submucosal injection with indigo carmine mixed solution did not improve the CRR or macroscopic delineation of EMR of colorectal neoplasias.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10620-018-4918-6

  5 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29388683
[Au] Autor:Sewell T; Courtney H; Tawfeek S; Afifi R
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Weston General Hospital, Weston-super-Mare, UK.
[Ti] Title:The feasibility and safety of transvaginal bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and safety of transvaginal bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO). METHODS: The present retrospective case series included consecutive women who underwent transvaginal BSO at a single general gynecology unit at Weston General Hospital, Weston-super-Mare, UK, between February 1, 2011, and July 31, 2014. Transvaginal BSO procedures were performed by an experienced surgeon. Feasibility and safety outcomes were reviewed from patient case notes. RESULTS: There were 127 patients included in the analysis. In all, 109 patients underwent transvaginal BSO at the time of vaginal hysterectomy, whereas 18 women underwent this procedure following a previous vaginal hysterectomy. Transvaginal BSO was successful in 126 (99.2%) patients; adverse events occurred among nine (7.1%) patients, including a single occurrence of ureteric injury that was detected and repaired intraoperatively. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that transvaginal BSO was a feasible and safe procedure when conducted by an experienced surgeon.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12458

  6 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29439278
[Au] Autor:Nagahama T; Yao K; Uedo N; Doyama H; Ueo T; Uchita K; Ishikawa H; Kanesaka T; Takeda Y; Wada K; Imamura K; Arima H; Shimokawa T
[Ad] Address:Department of Endoscopy, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Delineation of the extent of early gastric cancer by magnifying narrow-band imaging and chromoendoscopy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Endoscopy;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8812
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Accurate delineation of tumor margins is necessary for curative resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). The objective of this multicenter, randomized, controlled study was to compare the accuracy with which magnifying narrow-band imaging (M-NBI) and indigo carmine chromoendoscopy delineate EGC margins. METHODS: Patients with EGC ≥ 10 mm undergoing endoscopic or surgical resection were enrolled. The oral-side margins of the lesions were first evaluated with conventional white-light endoscopy in both groups and then delineated by either chromoendoscopy or M-NBI. Biopsies were taken from noncancerous and cancerous mucosa, each at 5 mm from the margin. Accurate delineation was judged to have been achieved when the histological findings in all biopsy samples were consistent with endoscopic diagnoses. The primary end point was the difference in rate of accurate delineation between the two techniques. RESULTS: Data on 343 patients were analyzed. The accurate delineation rate (95 % confidence interval) was 85.7 % (80.4 - 91.0) in the chromoendoscopy group (n = 168), and 88.0 % (83.2 - 92.8) in the M-NBI group (n = 175;  = 0.63). Lower third tumor location (odds ratio [OR] 2.9;  = 0.01), nonflat macroscopic type (OR 4.4;  < 0.01), and high diagnostic confidence (OR 3.6;  < 0.001) were associated with accurate delineation, whereas use of M-NBI was not (OR 1.2;  = 0.39). Even after adjustment for identified confounders, the difference in accurate delineation between the groups was not significant (OR 1.0;  = 0.82). CONCLUSIONS: M-NBI does not offer superior delineation of EGC margins compared with chromoendoscopy; the two methods appear to be clinically equivalent.
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0044-100790

  7 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29195216
[Au] Autor:Popov AL; Zholobak NM; Balko OI; Balko OB; Shcherbakov AB; Popova NR; Ivanova OS; Baranchikov AE; Ivanov VK
[Ad] Address:Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region 142290, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Photo-induced toxicity of tungsten oxide photochromic nanoparticles.
[So] Source:J Photochem Photobiol B;178:395-403, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2682
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We synthesised a new type of photochromic tungsten oxide nanoparticles, analysed their photocatalytic activity and carried out a thorough analysis of their effect on prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Ultrasmall hydrated tungsten oxide nanoparticles were prepared by means of hydrothermal treatment of tungstic acid in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a template, stabiliser and growth regulator. Tungstic acid was synthesised through an ion-exchange method using sodium tungstate solution and a strongly acidic cation exchange resin. Upon illumination, photochromic nanoparticles of WO were shown to increase greatly their toxicity against both bacterial (both gram-positive and gram-negative - P. aeruginosa, E. coli and S. aureus) and mammalian cells (primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts); under the same conditions, fungi (C. albicans) were less sensitive to the action of tungsten oxide nanoparticles. UV irradiation of primary mouse fibroblasts in the presence of WO nanoparticles demonstrated a time- and dose-dependent toxic effect, the latter leading to a significant decrease in dehydrogenase activity and an increase in the number of dead cells. WO nanoparticles were photocatalytically active under both UV light and even diffused daylight filtered through a window glass, leading to indigo carmine organic dye discolouration. The obtained experimental data not only show good prospects for biomedical applications of tungsten trioxide, but also demonstrate the need for clear control of biosafety when it is used in various household materials and appliances.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry
Oxides/chemistry
Tungsten/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Catalysis
Cell Line
Cell Survival/drug effects
Cell Survival/radiation effects
Coloring Agents/chemistry
Fungi/drug effects
Fungi/radiation effects
Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects
Gram-Negative Bacteria/radiation effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria/radiation effects
Metal Nanoparticles/toxicity
Mice
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Oxidoreductases/metabolism
Ultraviolet Rays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Coloring Agents); 0 (Oxides); 940E10M08M (tungsten oxide); EC 1.- (Oxidoreductases); V9306CXO6G (Tungsten)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28821467
[Au] Autor:Kim J; Lee PG; Jung EO; Kim BG
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:In vitro characterization of CYP102G4 from Streptomyces cattleya: A self-sufficient P450 naturally producing indigo.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1866(1):60-67, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Self-sufficient CYP102As possess outstanding hydroxylating activity to fatty acids such as myristic acid. Other CYP102 subfamily members share substrate specificity of CYP102As, but, occasionally, unusual characteristics of its own subfamily have been found. In this study, only one self-sufficient cytochrome P450 from Streptomyces cattleya was renamed from CYP102A_scat to CYP102G4, purified and characterized. UV-Vis spectrometry pattern, FAD/FMN analysis, and protein sequence comparison among CYP102s have shown that CYP102 from Streptomyces cattleya belongs to CYP102G subfamily. It showed hydroxylation activity toward fatty acids generating ω-1, ω-2, and ω-3-hydroxyfatty acids, which is similar to the general substrate specificity of CYP102 family. Unexpectedly, however, expression of CYP102G4 showed indigo production in LB medium batch flask culture, and high catalytic activity (k /K ) for indole was measured as 6.14±0.10min mM . Besides indole, CYP102G4 was able to hydroxylate aromatic compounds such as flavone, benzophenone, and chloroindoles. Homology model has shown such ability to accept aromatic compounds is due to its bigger active site cavity. Unlike other CYP102s, CYP102G4 did not have biased cofactor dependency, which was possibly determined by difference in NAD(P)H binding residues (Ala984, Val990, and Tyr1064) compared to CYP102A1 (Arg966, Lys972 and Trp1046). Overall, a self-sufficient CYP within CYP102G subfamily was characterized using purified enzymes, which appears to possess unique properties such as an only prokaryotic CYP naturally producing indigo.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Proteins/metabolism
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/metabolism
Fatty Acids/metabolism
Indigo Carmine/metabolism
NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase/metabolism
Streptomyces/enzymology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Motifs
Bacterial Proteins/chemistry
Bacterial Proteins/genetics
Benzophenones/metabolism
Catalytic Domain
Cloning, Molecular
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/chemistry
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/genetics
Escherichia coli/genetics
Escherichia coli/metabolism
Fatty Acids/chemistry
Flavones/metabolism
Gene Expression
Hydroxylation
Indoles/metabolism
Kinetics
Models, Molecular
NADP/chemistry
NADP/metabolism
NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase/chemistry
NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase/genetics
Protein Binding
Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs
Protein Structure, Secondary
Recombinant Proteins/chemistry
Recombinant Proteins/genetics
Recombinant Proteins/metabolism
Streptomyces/genetics
Structural Homology, Protein
Substrate Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Benzophenones); 0 (Fatty Acids); 0 (Flavones); 0 (Indoles); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 53-59-8 (NADP); 701M4TTV9O (benzophenone); 8724FJW4M5 (indole); 9035-51-2 (Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System); D3741U8K7L (Indigo Carmine); EC 1.6.2.4 (NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase); EC 1.6.2.4 (flavocytochrome P450 BM3 monoxygenases); S2V45N7G3B (flavone)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170820
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29305200
[Au] Autor:Bayne DB; Usawachintachit M; Chi T
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, CA.
[Ti] Title:Ultrasound for Intraoperative Confirmation of Antegrade Ureteral Stent Placement During Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty.
[So] Source:Urology;, 2018 Jan 02.
[Is] ISSN:1527-9995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To describe our ultrasound technique for confirming intraoperative, antegrade-placed ureteral stent position during laparoscopic pyeloplasty. BACKGROUND: Disadvantages of retrograde stent placement include the need to reposition the patient into and out of the lithotomy position. Antegrade stent placement can reduce procedure time but requires confirming appropriate distal placement into the bladder with cystoscopy, percutaneous drain placement, or instillation of methylthioninium chloride or indigo carmine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 3-way 20-French Foley catheter is placed after induction with general anesthesia. Laparoscopic transperitoneal dismembered pyeloplasty is performed. Intraoperatively, the bladder is filled retrograde with 300ccs normal saline. After completing the posterior suture line of the ureteral anastomosis, a 4.8-French, 26-cm ureteral stent is placed antegrade down the ureter using a 5-French exchange catheter and guidewire. The stent is passed over the guidewire into the bladder. The proximal curl is then placed into the renal pelvis and the anastomosis is completed. Without patient repositioning, an intraoperative bladder ultrasound is performed to identify the distal stent curl within the bladder lumen. RESULTS: This technique demonstrated that ultrasound can guide antegrade stent placement in adult, laparoscopic ureteral surgery. It eliminated the need for intraoperative repositioning of the patient for intraoperative cystoscopy to confirm stent placement and was performed successfully during 8 laparoscopic pyeloplasty cases without failure. Ultrasound is likely more sensitive compared with looking for the presence of vesicoureteral reflux after stent placement, prevents stent malposition, and avoids the use of intravesical dyes that upon reflux can stain tissues and obscure surgical planes. CONCLUSION: Here we demonstrate successful use of intraoperative ultrasound to confirm appropriate distal stent positioning in the bladder of an adult patient following antegrade stent placement for laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. To our knowledge, this has been described in pediatrics, but never in adult patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1259 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29389566
[Au] Autor:Manjunatha JGG
[Ad] Address:Dept of Chemistry, FMKMC College, Madikeri, Mangalore University Constituent College, Karnataka, India. Electronic address: manju1853@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A novel poly (glycine) biosensor towards the detection of indigo carmine: A voltammetric study.
[So] Source:J Food Drug Anal;26(1):292-299, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1021-9498
[Cp] Country of publication:China (Republic : 1949- )
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The electrochemical behavior of indigo carmine (IC) at poly (glycine) modified carbon paste electrode (PGMCPE) was investigated by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The oxidation peak of IC was observed in phosphate buffer of pH 6.5. The influence of different pH, scan rate, and concentration were analyzed. The probable reaction mechanism involved in the oxidation of IC was also proposed. Results showed that PGMCPE a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of IC under optimal conditions. The electrocatalytic response of the sensor was proportional to the IC concentration in the range of (2 × 10 -1 × 10 M) and (1.5 × 10 -6 × 10 M) with a limit of detection 11 × 10 M and limit of quantification 3.6 × 10 M. The modified electrode demonstrated many advantages such as simple preparation, high sensitivity, low detection of limit, excellent catalytic activity, short response time, and remarkable antifouling property toward IC and its oxidation product.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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