Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29427703
[Au] Autor:Fei C; She R; Li G; Zhang L; Fan W; Xia S; Xue F
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory for Veterinary Chemical Drugs and Pharmaceutics, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 200241 Shanghai, PR China. Electronic address: aries@shvri.ac.cn.
[Ti] Title:Safety and clinical efficacy of tenvermectin, a novel antiparasitic 16-membered macrocyclic lactone antibiotics.
[So] Source:Eur J Pharm Sci;117:154-160, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tenvermectin (TVM) is a novel 16-membered macrocyclic lactone antibiotics, which contains component TVM A and TVM B. However there is not any report on safety and clinical efficacy of TVM for developing as a potential drug. In order to understand the part of safety and clinical efficacy of TVM, we conducted the acute toxicity test, the standard bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test and the clinical deworming test. In the acute toxicity studies, TVM, TVM A and ivermectin (IVM) were administrated once by oral gavage to mice and rats. Results showed that the oral LD values of TVM, TVM A and IVM in mice were 74.41, 106.95 and 53.06 mg/kg respectively. The oral LD values of TVM and TVM A in rats were determined to be 164.22 and 749.34 mg/kg respectively. TVM and IVM are moderately toxic substances, meanwhile the TVM A belongs to low toxic compounds, implying that the acute toxicity is highly related to the length of side chain of TVM at position C25. In the Ames test, results showed that TVM did not induce mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium TA97a, TA98, TA100, TA102 and TA1535 with and without metabolic activation system, speculating that the mutagenicity is probably not related to the side chain at position C25 of 16-membered macrocyclic lactone antibiotics. In the efficacy trail of TVM against swine nematodes, growing pigs natural infection of Ascaris suum and Trichuris suis were treated with a single subcutaneous injection 0.3 mg/kg b.w.. Results showed that TVM and IVM had excellent effect in expelling Ascaris suum, and TVM had potential efficacy against Trichuris suis, however IVM had no effect on Trichuris suis. This study suggests that the side chain of TVM at position C25 may have important biological functions, which is one of the key sites of the studies on structure-activity relationship of 16-membered macrocyclic lactone compounds. TVM is a new compound exhibited some advantages worthy of developing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29340835
[Au] Autor:Snell TW; Johnston RK; Matthews AB; Zhou H; Gao M; Skolnick J
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332-0230, USA. terry.snell@biosci.gatech.edu.
[Ti] Title:Repurposed FDA-approved drugs targeting genes influencing aging can extend lifespan and healthspan in rotifers.
[So] Source:Biogerontology;19(2):145-157, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6768
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pharmaceutical interventions can slow aging in animals, and have advantages because their dose can be tightly regulated and the timing of the intervention can be closely controlled. They also may complement environmental interventions like caloric restriction by acting additively. A fertile source for therapies slowing aging is FDA approved drugs whose safety has been investigated. Because drugs bind to several protein targets, they cause multiple effects, many of which have not been characterized. It is possible that some of the side effects of drugs prescribed for one therapy may have benefits in retarding aging. We used computationally guided drug screening for prioritizing drug targets to produce a short list of candidate compounds for in vivo testing. We applied the virtual ligand screening approach FINDSITE for screening potential anti-aging protein targets against FDA approved drugs listed in DrugBank. A short list of 31 promising compounds was screened using a multi-tiered approach with rotifers as an animal model of aging. Primary and secondary survival screens and cohort life table experiments identified four drugs capable of extending rotifer lifespan by 8-42%. Exposures to 1M erythromycin, 5M carglumic acid, 3M capecitabine, and 1M ivermectin, extended rotifer lifespan without significant effect on reproduction. Some drugs also extended healthspan, as estimated by mitochondria activity and mobility (swimming speed). Our most promising result is that rotifer lifespan was extended by 7-8.9% even when treatment was started in middle age.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10522-018-9745-9

  3 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517452
[Au] Autor:Avni-Magen N; Eshar D; Friedman M; Kirmayer D; Letschert L; Gati I; Kaufman E; Paz A; Lavy E
[Ti] Title:RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF A NOVEL SUSTAINED-RELEASE IVERMECTIN VARNISH FOR TREATMENT OF WOUND MYIASIS IN ZOO-HOUSED ANIMALS.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;49(1):201-205, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Myiasis is a major disease condition in human and veterinary medicine. Domestic, free-ranging, and zoo-housed animals can be severely affected by myiasis. Depending on case severity, multiple treatment episodes may be indicated and can lead to recurrent capturing, handling stress, and anesthetics, all of which increase the risk of adverse responses (including death) individually and also in the herd. As an insecticide, ivermectin is often used for larval control. A total of 28 individual myiasis cases were retrospectively evaluated, out of which 11 cases were also treated using an ivermectin sustained-release varnish (SRV). The clinical outcome of all cases was assessed and the results suggest that the use of a topical ivermectin SRV (with or without concurrent injectable ivermectin) can reduce handling and treatments, has no adverse effects, and has minimal recurrence of the disease when compared with cases treated without it.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1638/2016-0299R2.1

  4 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29360939
[Au] Autor:Repetto SA; Ruybal P; Batalla E; Lpez C; Fridman V; Sierra M; Radisic M; Bravo PM; Risso MG; Gonzlez Cappa SM; Alba Soto CD
[Ad] Address:Facultad de Medicina, Instituto de Investigaciones en Microbiologa y Parasitologa Mdica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientficas y Tcnicas.
[Ti] Title:Strongyloidiasis Outside Endemic Areas: Long-term Parasitological and Clinical Follow-up After Ivermectin Treatment.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 19.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Strongyloides stercoralis affects 30-100 million people worldwide. The first-line therapy is ivermectin. Cure is defined as the absence of larvae by parasitological methods 1 year after treatment. To date, no longitudinal parasitological studies for longer periods of time have been conducted to confirm its cure. Here, we evaluated treatment response in long-term follow-up patients with chronic infection using parasitological and molecular methods for larvae or DNA detection. Methods: A prospective, descriptive, observational study was conducted between January 2009 and September 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Twenty-one patients with S. stercoralis diagnosis were evaluated 30, 60, and 90 days as well as 1, 2, 3, and/or 4 years after treatment by conventional methods (fresh stool, Ritchie method, agar plate culture), S. stercoralis-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in stool DNA, and eosinophil values. Results: During follow-up, larvae were detected by conventional methods in 14 of 21 patients. This parasitological reactivation was observed starting 30 days posttreatment (dpt) and then at different times since 90 dpt. Eosinophil values decreased (P = .001) 30 days after treatment, but their levels were neither associated with nor predicted these reactivations. However, S. stercoralis DNA was detected by PCR in all patients, both in their first and subsequent stool samples, thus reflecting the poor efficacy of ivermectin at eradicating parasite from host tissues. Asymptomatic eosinophilia was the most frequent clinical form among chronically infected patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that the parasitological cure is unlikely. Strongyloidiasis must be considered a chronic infection and ivermectin administration schedules should be reevaluated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1069

  5 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29313486
[Au] Autor:de Almeida Basano S; de Souza Almeida Aranha Camargo J; Fontes G; Pereira AR; Medeiros JF; de Oliveira Laudisse MC; de Godoi Mattos Ferreira R; Camargo LMA
[Ad] Address:Universidade Federal de So Joo Del Rei, Campus Centro Oeste, Divinpolis, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Phase III Clinical Trial to Evaluate Ivermectin in the Reduction of infection in the Brazilian Amazon.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;98(3):786-790, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The treatment of mansonelliasis is still a challenge because there are few clinical trials for the treatment of the disease. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study (phase III clinical trial) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a single oral dose of ivermectin (0.15 mg/kg) in the reduction of the microfilaraemia and the occurrence of adverse effects in infected people compared with the control group treated with placebo. A total of 49 microfilaraemic patients were randomly selected from the municipality of Lbrea, State of Amazonas, in the Brazilian Amazon. Among them, 40 patients have concluded the study, 19 treated with ivermectin and 21 treated with placebo. In the first and third days after the treatment, all the patients were clinically evaluated, and the diagnostic and quantification of blood microfilariae through blood filtration in polycarbonate membranes was performed. A significant reduction of the microfilaraemia (99.9%) was observed in the patients who received ivermectin. Slight changes in laboratory test results, without clinical importance, were seen in treated and control groups. Our results suggest that ivermectin is effective and safe for the treatment of infections caused by .
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.17-0698

  6 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29292916
[Au] Autor:Jonsson P; Lindelf B; Nordlind K; Bornstein S
[Ad] Address:Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Hudkliniken Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Hudkliniken Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Vid klda, tnk alltid p skabb!
[So] Source:Lakartidningen;114, 2017 Nov 07.
[Is] ISSN:1652-7518
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:swe
[Ab] Abstract:In case of pruritus, always consider scabies! Scabies is an itching skin disease caused by the miteSarcoptes scabieiwhich affects more than 100 million people worldwide. Regarded as a neglected tropical disease by the WHO, it is a major public health burden in endemic areas. As direct skin-to-skin contact is the main route of transmission family members and sexual partners are often affected. Typical presentation includes a severely pruritic rash with predilection for the extremities and the trunk. Definitive diagnosis relies on microscopic identification of the mites. Future, more efficient, diagnostic methods may include serological testing or PCR forS. scabieiDNA. A benzyl benzoate and disulfiram based lotion, Tenutex, is the treatment of choice in Sweden with topical permethrin or oral ivermectin being used in certain cases. Scabies is an important diagnosis to consider in all patients presenting with pruritus.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Scabies
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Animals
Antiparasitic Agents/administration & dosage
Antiparasitic Agents/therapeutic use
Child
Humans
Infant
Pruritus/parasitology
Sarcoptes scabiei
Scabies/diagnosis
Scabies/drug therapy
Scabies/epidemiology
Scabies/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiparasitic Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28749332
[Au] Autor:Landehag J; Skogen A; sbakk K; Kan B
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Finnmark Hospital Trust, Hammerfest, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Human myiasis caused by the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi, case series from Norway, 2011 to 2016.
[So] Source:Euro Surveill;22(29), 2017 Jul 20.
[Is] ISSN:1560-7917
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypoderma tarandi causes myiasis in reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus spp.) in most northern hemisphere regions where these animals live. We report a series of 39 human myiasis cases caused by H. tarandi in Norway from 2011 to 2016. Thirty-two were residents of Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway, one a visitor to Finnmark, and six lived in other counties of Norway where reindeer live. Clinical manifestations involved migratory dermal swellings of the face and head, enlargement of regional lymph nodes, and periorbital oedema, with or without eosinophilia. Most cases of human myiasis are seen in tropical and subtropical countries, and in tourists returning from such areas. Our findings demonstrate that myiasis caused by H. tarandi is more common than previously thought. Healthcare professionals in regions where there is a likelihood of human infestation with H. tarandi (regions populated by reindeer), or treating returning travellers, should be aware of the condition. All clinicians are advised to obtain a detailed travel history when assessing patients with migratory dermal swellings. On clinical suspicion, ivermectin should be given to prevent larval invasion of the eye (ophthalmomyiasis). Since H. tarandi oviposits on hair, we suggest wearing a hat as a prevention measure.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diptera
Larva
Lymphadenopathy/etiology
Myiasis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Larva/physiology
Middle Aged
Parasite Egg Count
Reindeer/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505667
[Au] Autor:Filho AO; Dias D; Miranda ; Hebling E
[Ad] Address:Geriatric Dentistry Specialist, Department of Community Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Oral myiasis in older adult with severe Alzheimer's disease.
[So] Source:Spec Care Dentist;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1754-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Myiasis is a disease caused by the invasion of tissues by larvae of flies. The aim of this study was to carry out a review of reported cases of oral and maxillofacial myiasis in older adults and to show a case report of oral myiasis in a 95-year-old frail man with severe Alzheimer's disease from Brazil. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1988 and 2017, 35 oral and maxillofacial myiasis cases were reported in older adults in English-language studies from PubMed and Lilacs databases. CONCLUSIONS: Oral and maxillofacial myiasis in older adults showed low incidence and good prognosis of cure, when there were no systemic complications. Weakness, frailty, dementia, oral lesions, labial incompetence, poor oral hygiene, and bad breath were associated with this disease in reported cases. Preferential therapy choices were debridement alone or combined with Ivermectin. In this case report, debridement and Ivermectin prescription was an effective therapy for an older adult with severe Alzheimer's disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/scd.12277

  9 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505580
[Au] Autor:Mahdy MAK; Abdul-Ghani R; Abdulrahman TAA; Al-Eryani SMA; Al-Mekhlafi AM; Alhaidari SAA; Azazy AA
[Ad] Address:Tropical Disease Research Center, University of Science and Technology, Sana'a, Yemen.
[Ti] Title:Onchocerca volvulus infection in Tihama region - West of Yemen: Continuing transmission in ivermectin-targeted endemic foci and unveiled endemicity in districts with previously unknown status.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006329, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Onchocerciasis in Yemen is one of the most neglected diseases, where baseline estimates of onchocerciasis and monitoring of the impact of ivermectin regularly administered to the affected individuals on its transmission are lacking. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the anti-Ov16 IgG4 seroprevalence among local communities of Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates of Tihama Region. The factors possibly associated with previous exposure to infection were also studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in two ivermectin-targeted districts endemic for onchocerciasis in Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit and two untargeted districts with unknown previous endemicity in Hodeidah between February and July 2017. For 508 residents sampled by a multi-stage random approach, data were collected and blood specimens were screened for anti-Ov16 IgG4 using the SD BIOLINE Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid tests. The study revealed an overall anti-Ov16 IgG4 rate of 18.5% (94/508) in all surveyed districts, with 10.2% (12/118) of children aged ≤10 years being seropositive. Moreover, rates of 8.0% (4/50) and 6.1% (4/66) were found in districts not officially listed as endemic for the disease. Multivariable analysis confirmed the age of more than ten years and residing within a large family as the independent predictors of exposure to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Onchocerciasis transmission is still ongoing as supported by the higher anti-Ov16 IgG4 seroprevalence rate among children aged ≤10 years compared to that (<0.1%) previously set by the World Health Organization as a serologic criterion for transmission interruption. Further large-scale studies combining serologic and entomologic criteria are recommended for the mapping of O. volvulus in human and blackfly populations in endemic foci and their neighboring areas of uncertain endemicity. In addition, ivermectin distribution, coverage and impact on disease transmission need to be continually assessed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006329

  10 / 7113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497506
[Au] Autor:Mischlinger J; Veletzky L; Tazemda-Kuitsouc GB; Pitzinger P; Matsegui PB; Gmeiner M; Lagler H; Gebru T; Held J; Mordmller B; Ramharter M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine I, Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Behavioural and clinical predictors for Loiasis.
[So] Source:J Glob Health;8(1):010413, 2018 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2047-2986
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Loiasis is a vector-borne disease in Central and West Africa. While there is still uncertainty to what extent loiasis is responsible for population morbidity, individuals having both loiasis and onchocerciasis have a high risk of fatal encephalopathy when treatment (ie, ivermectin) for onchocerciasis is given. Therefore it is current policy that communities of high loiasis-burden are excluded from mass drug administration programmes of ivermectin. To address this treatment gap we present diagnostic scores, based on clinical and behavioural predictors that may help to rapidly identify sub-groups with loiasis within high-burden communities. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed in the province of la Ngounie, Gabon between December 2015 and Februrary 2016 and 947 participants of all ages were recruited. Clinical parameters and behavioural exposure factors were ascertained by questionnaire-based interviews. Parasitological analysis of blood samples was performed for detection. Diagnostic scores consisting of clinical and behavioural factors were modelled to predict loiasis in sub-groups residing in endemic regions. Results: Increasing sylvan exposure was identified as important risk factor for loiasis with adjusted odds ratios of 5.1 (95% confidence interval CI 2.6-9.9) for occasional forest exposure, 11.1 (95% CI 5.4-22.6) for frequent forest exposure and 25.7 (95% CI 12.5-52.9) for intensive forest exposure. Individuals with loiasis were 7.7 (95% CI 5.4-11.0) times more likely to report recurrent pruritus than those without loiasis. Reporting of regular daily exposure to the deep rain forest and recurrent pruritus was 9-fold (positive likelihood ratio 9.18; 95% CI: 6.39-13.18) more prevalent in individuals with loiasis than in controls. Concordantly, the absence of regular weekly forest exposure was associated with extremely low disease-likelihood (negative likelihood ratio 0.09; 95% CI 0.05-0.16). Conclusions: These composite scores may serve as a simple tool to rapidly identify both those most and those least at risk of disease and may simplify loiasis control activities as well as screening procedures for studies on loiasis. Further, they may aid policy-makers to tailor the delivery of ivermectin mass drug administration for onchocerciasis control programmes more effectively and safely in regions of high loiasis-burden.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.7189/jogh.08.010413


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