Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Jaw and Neoplasms [Words]
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[PMID]: 28454732
[Au] Autor:Yang Z; Su Z; DeWitt JP; Xie L; Chen Y; Li X; Han L; Li D; Xia J; Zhang Y; Yang Y; Jin C; Zhang J; Li S; Li K; Zhang Z; Qu X; He Z; Chen Y; Shen Y; Ren M; Yuan Z
[Ad] Address:Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors Research Center of Yunnan Province, Department of Orthopaedics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University (Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province), Kunming, Yunnan 650118, China. Electronic address: yangzuozhang@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Fluvastatin Prevents Lung Adenocarcinoma Bone Metastasis by Triggering Autophagy.
[So] Source:EBioMedicine;19:49-59, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2352-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bone is one of the most preferred sites of metastasis in lung cancer. Currently, bisphosphonates and denosumab are major agents for controlling tumor-associated skeletal-related events (SREs). However, both bisphosphonates and denosumab significantly increase the risk for jaw osteonecrosis. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors and the most frequently prescribed cholesterol-lowering agents, have been reported to inhibit tumor progression and induce autophagy in cancer cells. However, the effects of statin and role of autophagy by statin on bone metastasis are unknown. In this study, we report that fluvastatin effectively prevented lung adenocarcinoma bone metastasis in a nude mouse model. We further reveal that fluvastatin-induced anti-bone metastatic property was largely dependent on its ability to induce autophagy in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Atg5 or Atg7 deletion, or 3-methyadenine (3-MA) or Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1) treatment prevented the fluvastatin-induced suppression of bone metastasis. Furthermore, we reveal that fluvastatin stimulation increased the nuclear p53 expression, and fluvastatin-induced autophagy and anti-bone metastatic activity were mostly dependent on p53.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Bone Neoplasms/prevention & control
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated/therapeutic use
Indoles/therapeutic use
Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenocarcinoma/metabolism
Adenocarcinoma/pathology
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology
Autophagy/drug effects
Bone Neoplasms/metabolism
Bone Neoplasms/secondary
Cell Line, Tumor
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated/pharmacology
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
Indoles/pharmacology
Lung Neoplasms/metabolism
Lung Neoplasms/pathology
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mice, Nude
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated); 0 (Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors); 0 (Indoles); 0 (Tumor Suppressor Protein p53); 4L066368AS (fluvastatin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29370211
[Au] Autor:Hayes AR; Brungs D; Pavlakis N
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Osteoclast inhibitors to prevent bone metastases in men with high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191455, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In advanced prostate cancer, osteoclast inhibitors prevent and palliate skeletal related events associated with bone metastases. However, it is uncertain whether they play a disease-modifying role earlier in the course of the disease. METHODS: Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and ASCO conference proceedings were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared osteoclast inhibitors with placebo and/or standard of care (SOC) in patients with high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer. The primary outcome measure was incidence of new bone metastases; secondary outcomes included overall survival (OS), prostate cancer specific survival, mortality unrelated to prostate cancer, toxicity and health related quality of life outcomes. Results are presented as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Six randomized controlled trials (5947 participants) were included, five evaluating bisphosphonates and one denosumab. Overall, there was no difference in incidence of bone metastases between participants treated with osteoclast inhibitors versus placebo/SOC (RR 1.09, 95%CI 0.84-1.41, p = 0.51) however significant heterogeneity was observed between studies. The denosumab trial was the largest and only positive trial amongst the included studies (RR 0.83, 95%CI 0.73-0.95, p = 0.007). No significant difference was observed in OS (RR 0.99 95% CI 0.89-1.10, p = 0.84) nor prostate cancer specific survival (RR 1.12 95%CI 0.93-1.36, p = 0.24). Most studies reported increased rates of osteonecrosis of the jaw (5% or less) and hypocalcemia (2% or less) with osteoclast inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: While there is limited evidence that bisphosphonates alter the natural history of high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer, denosumab delays onset of bone metastases in this patient population. Neither class of osteoclast inhibitor demonstrated an impact on survival outcomes. Future trials with better defined patient selection and a robust definition for high risk disease is critical.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bone Density Conservation Agents/therapeutic use
Bone Neoplasms/prevention & control
Bone Neoplasms/secondary
Osteoclasts/drug effects
Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Denosumab/therapeutic use
Diphosphonates/therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Osteoclasts/pathology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bone Density Conservation Agents); 0 (Diphosphonates); 4EQZ6YO2HI (Denosumab)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191455

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[PMID]: 29496055
[Au] Autor:Yang WF; Choi WS; Leung YY; Curtin JP; Du R; Zhang CY; Chen XS; Su YX
[Ad] Address:Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
[Ti] Title:Three-dimensional printing of patient-specific surgical plates in head and neck reconstruction: A prospective pilot study.
[So] Source:Oral Oncol;78:31-36, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0593
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Surgical plates have been extensively used in head and neck reconstruction and conventional plates are mass-produced with universal configurations. To overcome disadvantages of conventional surgical plates, we have been exploring patient-specific surgical plates using the three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. We hypothesized that the application of 3D-printed patient-specific surgical plates in head and neck reconstruction is feasible, safe and precise. METHODS: We are conducting a prospective clinical trial to assess the feasibility, safety and accuracy of applying 3D-printed patient-specific surgical plates in head and neck reconstruction. The primary endpoint was the intraoperative success rate. Secondary endpoints included the incidence and severity of postoperative adverse events within six months postoperatively. The accuracy of surgical outcomes was also explored by comparing the planned and final positions of the maxilla, mandible and grafted bone segments. RESULTS: From December 2016 to October 2017, ten patients were enrolled and underwent head and neck reconstruction using 3D-printed patient-specific surgical plates. The patient-specific surgical plates adapted to bone surface precisely and no plate-bending was performed. The intraoperative success rate was 100%. The average follow-up period was 6.5 months. No major adverse events were observed. The mean absolute distance deviation of integral mandible or maxilla was 1.40 ±â€¯0.63 mm, which showed a high accuracy of reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: The 3D printing of patient-specific surgical plates could be effective in head and neck reconstruction. Surgical procedures were simplified. The precise jaw reconstruction was achieved with high accuracy. Long-term results with a larger sample size are warranted to support a final conclusion. The study protocol has been registered in ClinicalTrials.gov with a No. of NCT03057223.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29390315
[Au] Autor:Wang HW; Ma CY; Qin XJ; Zhang CP
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck Oncology, Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Management strategy in patient with familial gigantiform cementoma: A case report and analysis of the literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9138, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Familial gigantiform cementoma (FGC) is a rare benign autosomal dominant fibrocemento-osseous lesion generally limited to the facial bones, typically in the anterior portion of the mandible; it is often associated with abnormalities of the long bones and prepubertal pathologic fractures. Owing to the small number of such patients, a uniform treatment criterion has not been established. This paper presents a patient with FGC who was treated in our department, and offers a systematic review of the patients reported in the literature. Our aim was to explore the treatment strategy for patients with FGC. PATIENT CONCERNS: Our patient, a 13-year-old boy, presented with a painless enlargement of the mandible first noted 2 years earlier. It had grown rapidly over the preceding 8 months, affecting both his appearance and ability to chew. DIAGNOSIS: Based on the pathologic, clinical, and radiographic features, FGC was diagnosed. INTERVENTIONS: Mandibuloectomy was performed. The mandibular defect was immediately reconstructed with his right vascularized iliac crest flap. At the same time, a PubMed search was conducted to identify studies reporting on other patients with FGC. OUTCOMES: A 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scan demonstrated appropriate height of the new alveolar bone. Follow-up results showed recovery of the patient's appearance and mandibular function. He was free of recurrence at 4-year follow-up. LESSONS: FGC is a rare benign fibrocemento-osseous lesion of the jaws that can cause severe facial deformity. Incomplete removal leads to more rapid growth of the residual lesion. Therefore, extensive resection is a suitable strategy to avoid recurrence. Defects of the facial bones found intraoperatively should be repaired with resort to an appropriate donor site. However, it is important to be aware that patients with FGC always have concomitant abnormalities of skeletal metabolism and structure, as well as a vulnerability to fractures of the long bones of the lower extremity. Therefore, the optimal management strategy should include a review of treatment options for other patients as reported in the literature. An optimal protocol can not only provide sufficient high-quality bone suitable for the reconstruction of bone defects, but also minimize complications and maximize quality of life.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cementoma/diagnosis
Cementoma/surgery
Jaw Neoplasms/diagnosis
Jaw Neoplasms/surgery
Mandibular Neoplasms/diagnosis
Mandibular Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Bone Transplantation
Cementoma/diagnostic imaging
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Ilium/transplantation
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Jaw Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Male
Mandibular Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Mandibular Reconstruction
Surgical Flaps
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009138

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[PMID]: 29436921
[Au] Autor:Gallastegui A; Cheung J; Southard T; Hume KR
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, USA.
[Ti] Title:Volumetric and linear measurements of lung tumor burden from non-gated micro-CT imaging correlate with histological analysis in a genetically engineered mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer.
[So] Source:Lab Anim;:23677218756457, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1758-1117
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In vivo micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging allows longitudinal studies of pulmonary neoplasms in genetically engineered mouse models. Respiratory gating increases the accuracy of lung tumor measurements but lengthens anesthesia time in animals that may be at increased risk for complications. We hypothesized that semiautomated, volumetric, and linear tumor measurements performed in micro-CT images from non-gated scans would have correlation with histological findings. Primary lung tumors were induced in eight FVB mice with two transgenes (FVB/N-Tg(tetO-Kras2)12Hev/J; FVB.Cg-Tg(Scgb1a1-rtTA)1Jaw/J). Non-gated micro-CT scans were performed and the lungs were subsequently harvested. In the acquired micro-CT scans, measurements of all identified tumors were determined using the following methods: semiautomated three-dimensional (3D) volume, ellipsoid volume, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; sum of largest axial (i.e., transverse) diameter from five tumors), sum of largest axial diameters from all tumors (modified RECIST), and average axial diameter. For histological analysis, all five lung lobes were analyzed and the tumor area was summed from measurements made on five histological sections that were 300 µm apart from each other (covering a total depth of 1200 µm). All micro-CT measurement methods had very strong correlation with histological tumor burden (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.87 ( p = 0.0053) -0.98 ( p < 0.0001)). The only methods found to have different correlations were the semiautomated 3D method and the RECIST method (Williams' test for dependent overlapping correlations, p = 0.013). Our results suggest quantification of lung tumor burden from non-gated micro-CT imaging will reflect histological differences between mice and can therefore be used for between-group comparisons or when concerns about systemic health of research animals may limit lengthy anesthetic procedures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0023677218756457

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[PMID]: 29432652
[Au] Autor:McGowan K; Ivanovski S; Acton C
[Ad] Address:School of Dentistry, Oral Health, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland, 4222, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Osteonecrosis of the jaws: a 14-year retrospective survey of hospital admissions.
[So] Source:Aust Dent J;, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1834-7819
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a serious complication of both radiation and antiresorptive therapies. This study aimed to determine how many patients have been treated for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) and osteoradionecrosis (ORN), and whether the number of diagnoses has decreased over time with improved awareness and preventative measures. METHODS: Medical records at the Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Gold Coast University Hospital, and Robina Hospital were reviewed to identify patients diagnosed with MRONJ and ORN between January 2003 - May 2017. Data on patient demographics, year of admission, and primary disease were analysed. RESULTS: 238 patients were diagnosed with ONJ, of which 74.4% were ORN and 25.6% were MRONJ. Tongue (24.6%), floor of mouth (17.3%), and tonsillar (15.1%) squamous cell carcinomas were the most common primary diseases associated with ORN, with a strong male predominance (80%). 52.5% of patients diagnosed with MRONJ were taking low-dose antiresorptives for osteoporosis (44.2%), rheumatoid arthritis (4.6%) or Paget's disease (3.3%), while 47.5% were oncology patients receiving high-dose antiresorptives. CONCLUSIONS: The number of patients diagnosed with MRONJ and ORN has trended upwards since 2003. ORN affected three times more patients than MRONJ, and patients on low-dose antiresorptives accounted for over half of the MRONJ cases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/adj.12603

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[PMID]: 29242956
[Au] Autor:Baumhoer D
[Ad] Address:Knochentumor-Referenzzentrum und DÖSAK Referenzregister am Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsspital Basel, Universität Basel, Schönbeinstraße 40, 4031, Basel, Schweiz. daniel.baumhoer@usb.ch.
[Ti] Title:Odontogene Tumoren und Knochentumoren der Kieferregion : Änderungen der neuen WHO-Klassifikation. [Odontogenic tumours and bone tumours of the jaw : Changes in the new WHO classification].
[So] Source:Pathologe;39(1):35-41, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1963
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:At the beginning of 2017, the fourth edition of the WHO Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published, 12 years after the previous version. Notably, various changes introduced in the third edition have been revised so in some aspects the current classification has more similarities to the second edition of 1992 than to the third edition. A central goal of the editors was to create a classification that can be used worldwide. Molecular findings have therefore been included and updated but are not mandatory for establishing a diagnosis. This article discusses and comments on the most important changes implemented in the classification of gnathic lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00292-017-0398-2

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[PMID]: 29172311
[Au] Autor:Rice N; Srinivasan B; Macpherson D
[Ti] Title:Case Report: Metastatic Infratemporal Soft Tissue Myeloma Presenting as a Numb Lower Lip.
[So] Source:Dent Update;44(1):53-4, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0305-5000
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This is a case of a patient presenting to his general dental practitioner (GDP) with altered sensation in his lower lip with no obvious cause. Due to a prompt referral, the patient was investigated and diagnosed with an extramedullary presentation of multiple myeloma. A numb lip can present in general dental practice, although this is not common. There are several causes, for example, dental infection or fractured mandible. Clinical relevance: It is very important for the dental practitioner to recognize when there could be a potential sinister underlying cause and prompt referral, under the two week rule referral system, is indicated
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Multiple Myeloma/secondary
Soft Tissue Neoplasms/secondary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Humans
Hypesthesia/etiology
Lip
Male
Mandible
Multiple Myeloma/complications
Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis
Soft Tissue Neoplasms/complications
Soft Tissue Neoplasms/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28748232
[Au] Autor:Troiano G; Dioguardi M; Cocco A; Laino L; Cervino G; Cicciu M; Ciavarella D; Lo Muzio L
[Ti] Title:Conservative vs Radical Approach for the Treatment of Solid/Multicystic Ameloblastoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Last Decade.
[So] Source:Oral Health Prev Dent;15(5):421-426, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1602-1622
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To examine whether a difference exists in the relapse rate between the conservative and radical approaches after the treatment of solid/multicystic ameloblastoma (SMA), a systematic review of the literature based on evidence of the last decade was performed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The search strategy incorporated examinations of electronic databases, supplemented by hand searches. A search of four electronic databases, including Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science, was carried out for relevant studies published in the English language from January 2005 to September 2015. Cross referencing and hand research was used to identify further articles. Relative Risk (RR) as effect estimates was calculated in both fixed and random effects models. RESULTS: Of 4234 abstracts screened, only 26 articles met the inclusion criteria and were screened in full text. Of these, only 4 were included in the final meta-analysis. CONCLUSION: The inverse of variance test revealed a statistical difference in the relapse rate for SMA treatment with the conservative vs radical approach. The higher recurrence rate after a conservative approach compared to the surgical approach is significant. However, this review cannot give any recommendation due to the lack of clinical evidence.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ameloblastoma/therapy
Conservative Treatment
Jaw Neoplasms/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ameloblastoma/pathology
Humans
Jaw Neoplasms/pathology
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3290/j.ohpd.a38732

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[PMID]: 28454892
[Au] Autor:Diniz MG; Guimarães BVA; Pereira NB; de Menezes GHF; Gomes CC; Gomez RS
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Surgery and Pathology, School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Electronic address: marinadiniz@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:DNA damage response activation and cell cycle dysregulation in infiltrative ameloblastomas: A proposed model for ameloblastoma tumor evolution.
[So] Source:Exp Mol Pathol;102(3):391-395, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0945
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ameloblastoma/genetics
Cell Cycle/genetics
DNA Damage
Jaw Neoplasms/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Ameloblastoma/metabolism
Ameloblastoma/pathology
Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics
Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism
Child
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Jaw Neoplasms/metabolism
Jaw Neoplasms/pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Mutation
Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics
Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/metabolism
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cell Cycle Proteins); EC 2.7.11.1 (BRAF protein, human); EC 2.7.11.1 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171227
[Lr] Last revision date:171227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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