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[PMID]: 28452285
[Au] Autor:Woelders T; Beersma DGM; Gordijn MCM; Hut RA; Wams EJ
[Ad] Address:Chronobiology Unit, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Daily Light Exposure Patterns Reveal Phase and Period of the Human Circadian Clock.
[So] Source:J Biol Rhythms;32(3):274-286, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4531
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Light is the most potent time cue that synchronizes (entrains) the circadian pacemaker to the 24-h solar cycle. This entrainment process is an interplay between an individual's daily light perception and intrinsic pacemaker period under free-running conditions. Establishing individual estimates of circadian phase and period can be time-consuming. We show that circadian phase can be accurately predicted (SD = 1.1 h for dim light melatonin onset, DLMO) using 9 days of ambulatory light and activity data as an input to Kronauer's limit-cycle model for the human circadian system. This approach also yields an estimated circadian period of 24.2 h (SD = 0.2 h), with longer periods resulting in later DLMOs. A larger amount of daylight exposure resulted in an earlier DLMO. Individuals with a long circadian period also showed shorter intervals between DLMO and sleep timing. When a field-based estimation of tau can be validated under laboratory studies in a wide variety of individuals, the proposed methods may prove to be essential tools for individualized chronotherapy and light treatment for shift work and jetlag applications. These methods may improve our understanding of fundamental properties of human circadian rhythms under daily living conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Circadian Clocks
Light
Photoperiod
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Body Temperature
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Jet Lag Syndrome
Male
Melatonin
Sleep
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0748730417696787

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[PMID]: 29223281
[Au] Autor:Liyanarachchi K; Ross R; Debono M
[Ad] Address:Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. Electronic address: liyanarachchi.kamani@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Human studies on hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.
[So] Source:Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab;31(5):459-473, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1878-1594
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The daily rhythm of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is regulated by the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Cortisol, a glucocorticoid, acts as a secondary messenger between the central clock and the peripheral tissues. Changes in clock time, as seen in shift workers, alters the HPA axis and results in metabolic disturbances associated with ill health. Depression, anorexia nervosa and obstructive sleep apnoea, are associated with cortisol rhythm phase shifts and increased cortisol exposure. Higher nocturnal cortisol exposure is observed in patients with Cushing's syndrome and adrenal incidentalomas with autonomous cortisol secretion and is associated with insulin resistance, and increased cardiovascular risk and mortality. A decrease in cortisol rhythm amplitude is seen in adrenal insufficiency, and despite replacement, patients have an impaired quality of life and increased mortality. Research on cortisol replacement has focused on replacing the cortisol daily rhythm by subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusions and oral modified release hydrocortisone formulations with the aim of improving disease control and quality of life.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171210
[Lr] Last revision date:171210
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28845960
[Au] Autor:Burman D
[Ad] Address:Latterman Family Health Center, 2347 Fifth Ave, McKeesport, PA 15132.
[Ti] Title:Sleep Disorders: Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.
[So] Source:FP Essent;460:33-36, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2159-3000
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Shift work sleep disorder is a common problem in industrialized countries because of the need for occupations and services to continue to function 24 hours/day. Approximately 20% of employed adults in the United States are engaged in shift work. Shift work sleep disorder is diagnosed if there is a report of insomnia or excessive sleepiness for at least 3 months associated with a recurring work schedule that overlaps the usual time for sleep. Shift work is associated with an increased occurrence of metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, and it has been implicated in weight gain and cognitive impairment. There is evidence of increased absenteeism in night workers compared with day workers. A planned sleep schedule, timed bright light exposure, timed melatonin administration, and stimulants or drugs promoting alertness can be used to manage shift work sleep disorder. Jet lag is characterized by a misalignment between internal circadian rhythms and local time caused by rapid travel across at least two time zones. Not all travelers experience jet lag; risk factors include age, number of time zones crossed, and circadian preference. Management includes timed melatonin along with optional timed and dosed bright light exposure.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Circadian Rhythm/physiology
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/prevention & control
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/physiopathology
Sleep Hygiene
Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Melatonin/metabolism
Sleep
Wakefulness
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170829
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28844422
[Au] Autor:Dilixiati A; Koyanagi S; Kusunose N; Matsunaga N; Ohdo S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Dietary supplementation with essence of chicken enhances daily oscillations in plasma glucocorticoid levels and behavioral adaptation to the phase-shifted environmental light-dark cycle in mice.
[So] Source:J Pharmacol Sci;134(4):211-217, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1347-8648
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Maintenance of circadian rhythms is essential to many aspects of human health, including metabolism and neurological and psychiatric well-being. Chronic disruption of circadian clock function is implicated in increasing the risk of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events and development of cancers. However, there are little approaches to reinforce the function of circadian clock for prevention of these diseases. Essence of Chicken (EC) is a nutritional supplement that is traditionally made by extracting water soluble substances derived from cooking the whole chicken. In this study, we found that dietary supplementation with EC enhanced circadian oscillation of glucocorticoid secretion in mice, and this was accompanied by enhancement of circadian oscillation in the adrenal expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that mediates the rate-limiting step of glucocorticoid synthesis. Furthermore, EC facilitated re-entrainment of behavioral rhythm in mice when phase of the light-dark cycle was suddenly advanced. These results suggest that intake of EC has enhancement effect on circadian clock function in mice, which may contribute to sustain health and also offer new preventive strategies against circadian-related diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170903
[Lr] Last revision date:170903
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28738331
[Au] Autor:Huon LA; Guilleminault C
[Ti] Title:Future Perspectives in Sleep Medicine.
[So] Source:Adv Otorhinolaryngol;80:145-147, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1662-2847
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:"Sleep Medicine" is now a specialty in its own right. Currently, there is increasing recognition of the very negative impact sleep disorders have on learning, education, safety, and quality of life. Technological advances will help us to break down diagnoses (e.g., narcolepsy has now been subdivided into types 1 and 2, depending upon the hypocretin levels in the spinal fluid) and to discover relationships to other bodily systems (e.g., type 1 narcolepsy potentially being an autoimmune disorder). The modern lifestyle of many, as characterized by a shortening of sleep periods, shift work, jet lag, and the need to be constantly available, means that advances in sleep medicine may result in a major understanding of more balanced "work-rest lifestyle" modifications.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Sleep Medicine Specialty/trends
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Forecasting
Humans
Life Style
Narcolepsy/cerebrospinal fluid
Narcolepsy/diagnosis
Orexins/cerebrospinal fluid
Quality of Life
Sleep Wake Disorders/complications
Work
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Orexins)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171023
[Lr] Last revision date:171023
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170725
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000470886

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[PMID]: 28695835
[Au] Autor:Tunali V; Turgay N
[Ad] Address:Ege Üniversitesi Tip Fakültesi, Parazitoloji Ana Bilim Dali, Izmir, Türkiye. varoltunali@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:The Concept of Travel Medicine and the Actual Situation of Travel-Related Illnesses.
[So] Source:Turkiye Parazitol Derg;41(2):114-118, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2146-3077
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Travel medicine defines all diseases and medical situations that are related to travel. Travel medicine comprises infectious diseases, traumas, altitude sickness, sun burns, embolisms, jet lag, and many more travel-related situations. With the increasing possibility and ease of travel, the number of people who have travelled internationally has exceeded 1.13 billion in 2014, and the revenues of international travel have exceeded 1.25 trillion dollars. With every passing day, international travels are shifting toward the developing countries and to more exotic regions of the world, and travelers tend to be more adventurous and daring, thereby increasing risky behaviors during travels. Traveling plays an important role in transmitting infections such as Zika virus infection, Ebola, avian flu, severe acute respiratory syndrome, Chikungunya, and dengue fever and is the principal reason for the epidemics of these types of infections on a global scale. With this background, we suggest that travel medicine is an important but "neglected" medical discipline as the discipline of Parasitology itself like most parasitic diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170711
[Lr] Last revision date:170711
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5152/tpd.2017.5213

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[PMID]: 28641787
[Au] Autor:Espitia-Bautista E; Velasco-Ramos M; Osnaya-Ramírez I; Ángeles-Castellanos M; Buijs RM; Escobar C
[Ad] Address:Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Anatomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Social jet-lag potentiates obesity and metabolic syndrome when combined with cafeteria diet in rats.
[So] Source:Metabolism;72:83-93, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8600
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Modern lifestyle promotes shifted sleep onset and shifted wake up time between weekdays and weekends, producing a condition termed "social-jet lag." Disrupted sleep promotes increased appetite for carbohydrate and fat-rich food, which in long term leads to overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. In order to mimic the human situation we produced an experimental model of social-jet lag (Sj-l). With this model, we explored the link between shifted sleep time with consumption of a cafeteria diet (CafD) and the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. SUBJECTS/METHODS: The first experiment was designed to create and confirm the model of Sj-l. Rats (n=8-10/group) were exposed to a shifted sleep time protocol achieved by placing the rats in slow rotating wheels from Monday to Friday during the first 4h of the light period, while on weekends they were left undisturbed. The second experiment (n=8-12/group) explored the combined effect of Sj-l with the opportunity to ingest CafD. All protocols lasted 12weeks. We evaluated the development of overweight and indicators of metabolic syndrome. The statistical significance for all variables was set at P<0.05. RESULTS: Sj-l alone did not affect body weight gain but induced significant changes in cholesterol in metabolic variables representing a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Daily restricted access to CafD in the day or night induced glucose intolerance and only CafD during the day led to overweight. Sj-l combined with CafD induced overconsumption of the diet, potentiated body weight gain (16%) and promoted 5 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome including high insulin and dislipidemia. CONCLUSION: Present data provide an experimental model of social-jet lag that combined with overconsumption of CafD, and maximized the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Importantly, access to CafD during the night did not lead to overweight nor metabolic syndrome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Jet Lag Syndrome/complications
Metabolic Syndrome/etiology
Obesity/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Circadian Rhythm/physiology
Diet/adverse effects
Disease Models, Animal
Glucose Intolerance/etiology
Jet Lag Syndrome/etiology
Rats
Sleep/physiology
Weight Gain
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170624
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28416429
[Au] Autor:Madigand-Tordjman MA; Egler PJ; Bertran F; Jokic M; Guénolé F
[Ad] Address:Service de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent, CHU de Caen, 4, avenue Georges-Clemenceau, 14033 Caen cedex 9, France.
[Ti] Title:Somnambulisme avec mise en danger vital (syndrome d'Elpénor) chez un enfant. [Life-threatening sleepwalking (Elpenor's syndrome) in a 10-year-old child].
[So] Source:Arch Pediatr;24(6):557-560, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1769-664X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Though benign in the majority of cases, sleepwalking sometimes causes injuries due, among other causes, to falls. Such accidents can be life-threatening - a situation that has been termed Elpenor syndrome (in reference to an accident experienced by a character in Homer's epic The Odyssey) - in particular when entailing defenestration. This syndrome has been described in adults and adolescents; we report here a case in a child. OBSERVATION: This 10-year-old girl was admitted at night to our hospital after a 3-m fall at home. She was alert (Glasgow score, 15) at admission; a frontal wound and a deformation of the right wrist were noted. Brain CT scans showed a frontal skull fracture and frontal lobe contusion, wrist x-rays showed a displaced right fracture. The patient underwent urgent neurosurgery (wound excision and suture after reduction of skull fracture) and closed reduction and immobilization of the wrist fracture, both under general anesthesia. She underwent a psychiatric assessment in the intensive care unit 3 days after her fall. She was alert, well-oriented in time and space, and spoke fluently. She had no memory of her fall, only remembering going to bed in the evening before the accident and waking up in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. She displayed no sign of a concurrent mental illness and no suicidal ideas. Her parents reported that the evening of the accident she and her two brothers had all fallen asleep about 11:00 pm while watching TV, in the double bed of the guest room, placed just beside its window. At approximately 1:00 am, her father, who was going to bed and had just made noise in the hall, heard a cry from the guest room. He entered the room immediately and saw the opened window and his daughter lying on the outside ground; the brothers only awakened after the fall. The family had returned 2 days before from a 6-month stay in the United States, with jet-lag, sleep deprivation, and a disorganized sleep/wake rhythm in the patient. There was no medication before the accident, no substance use (including caffeine), and no concurrent medical problem. Over the 2 preceding years, the patient had undergone two witnessed episodes of early-nighttime arousal with altered consciousness and calm wandering (including going downstairs on one occasion), both strongly suggesting sleepwalking. There was a history of sleepwalking in her father and her older brother. Life-threatening sleepwalking (Elpenor syndrome) was diagnosed. The child and her parents were educated about sleepwalking; regularization of sleep schedules and sleep extension (avoidance of sleep deprivation, short napping when possible) were prescribed. We also recommended securing the home (bed, windows, and stairways). No pharmacological treatment was instituted. During the following 18 months, the child manifested only one noted sleepwalking episode, without risk-taking. She had no neurological or psychopathological sequela from her accident, of which she never had a memory. CONCLUSION: Elpenor syndrome can occur in a child; consequently, it is important to inform parents of children with sleepwalking about the necessity of always securing the night-time environment.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170515
[Lr] Last revision date:170515
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28415855
[Au] Autor:Ruscitto C; Ogden J
[Ad] Address:a School of Psychology , University of Surrey , Guildford , UK.
[Ti] Title:Predicting jet lag in long-haul cabin crew: The role of illness cognitions and behaviour.
[So] Source:Psychol Health;32(9):1055-1081, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1476-8321
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Established risk factors for jet lag are mostly physiological including circadian preference, age, gender, the number of flight zones crossed and to some extent direction of travel. Some research has also highlighted a role for psychosocial factors including sleep, diet and 'circadian' health behaviours and illness cognitions although this remains relatively untested. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of sleep, diet and illness cognitions in predicting perceived jet lag amongst long-haul crew. DESIGN: Sixty long-haul crew took part in a longitudinal study. Profile characteristics (including chronotype), preparation strategies (sleep, eating and 'circadian' behaviours) and illness cognitions were measured at baseline (before a trip). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjective jet lag (unidimensional and multidimensional) was measured on the crews' second day off (post-trip). RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses showed that unidimensional jet lag was predicted by the belief in a cyclical timeline, whereas multidimensional jet lag was predicted by multidimensional jet lag at baseline and to a lesser extent by identity. No role was found for profile characteristics and preparation strategies. CONCLUSION: Illness cognitions partly explain the experience of perceived jet lag in long-haul cabin crew indicating that jet lag is in part a psycho-social construct, not just a biological one.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Attitude to Health
Aviation
Cognition
Diet/psychology
Jet Lag Syndrome/psychology
Occupational Diseases/psychology
Sleep
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170907
[Lr] Last revision date:170907
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170419
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/08870446.2017.1314481

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[PMID]: 28411937
[Au] Autor:Mahadevan SV; Strehlow MC
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Alway Building, M-121, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: s.mahadevan@stanford.edu.
[Ti] Title:Preparing for International Travel and Global Medical Care.
[So] Source:Emerg Med Clin North Am;35(2):465-484, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1558-0539
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Thorough pretravel preparation and medical consultation can mitigate avoidable health and safety risks. A comprehensive pretravel medical consultation should include an individualized risk assessment, immunization review, and discussion of arthropod protective measures, malaria prophylaxis, traveler's diarrhea, and injury prevention. Travel with children and jet lag reduction require additional planning and prevention strategies; travel and evacuation insurance may prove essential when traveling to less resourced countries. Consideration should also be given to other high-risk travel scenarios, including the provision of health care overseas, adventure and extreme sports, water environments and diving, high altitude, and terrorism/unstable political situations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Referral and Consultation
Travel
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Child
Diarrhea/prevention & control
Humans
Immunization
Insurance, Health
Jet Lag Syndrome/prevention & control
Malaria/prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk Assessment
Wounds and Injuries/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170421
[Lr] Last revision date:170421
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170417
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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