Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ketosis [Words]
References found : 170154 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 17016 go to page                         

  1 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29340680
[Au] Autor:Jakobsen GS; Småstuen MC; Sandbu R; Nordstrand N; Hofsø D; Lindberg M; Hertel JK; Hjelmesæth J
[Ad] Address:Morbid Obesity Centre, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Association of Bariatric Surgery vs Medical Obesity Treatment With Long-term Medical Complications and Obesity-Related Comorbidities.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(3):291-301, 2018 01 16.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: The association of bariatric surgery and specialized medical obesity treatment with beneficial and detrimental outcomes remains uncertain. Objective: To compare changes in obesity-related comorbidities in patients with severe obesity (body mass index ≥40 or ≥35 and at least 1 comorbidity) undergoing bariatric surgery or specialized medical treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cohort study with baseline data of exposures from November 2005 through July 2010 and follow-up data from 2006 until death or through December 2015 at a tertiary care outpatient center, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Consecutive treatment-seeking adult patients (n = 2109) with severe obesity assessed (221 patients excluded and 1888 patients included). Exposures: Bariatric surgery (n = 932, 92% gastric bypass) or specialized medical treatment (n = 956) including individual or group-based lifestyle intervention programs. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes included remission and new onset of hypertension based on drugs dispensed according to the Norwegian Prescription Database. Prespecified secondary outcomes included changes in comorbidities. Adverse events included complications retrieved from the Norwegian Patient Registry and a local laboratory database. Results: Among 1888 patients included in the study, the mean (SD) age was 43.5 (12.3) years (1249 women [66%]; mean [SD] baseline BMI, 44.2 [6.1]; 100% completed follow-up at a median of 6.5 years [range, 0.2-10.1]). Surgically treated patients had a greater likelihood of remission and lesser likelihood for new onset of hypertension (remission: absolute risk [AR], 31.9% vs 12.4%); risk difference [RD], 19.5% [95% CI, 15.8%-23.2%], relative risk [RR], 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; new onset: AR, 3.5% vs 12.2%, RD, 8.7% [95% CI, 6.7%-10.7%], RR, 0.4 [95% CI, 0.3-0.5]; greater likelihood of diabetes remission: AR, 57.5% vs 14.8%; RD, 42.7% [95% CI, 35.8%-49.7%], RR, 3.9 [95% CI, 2.8-5.4]; greater risk of new-onset depression: AR, 8.9% vs 6.5%; RD, 2.4% [95% CI, 1.3%-3.5%], RR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.4-1.7]; and treatment with opioids: AR, 19.4% vs 15.8%, RD, 3.6% [95% CI, 2.3%-4.9%], RR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.2-1.4]). Surgical patients had a greater risk for undergoing at least 1 additional gastrointestinal surgical procedure (AR, 31.3% vs 15.5%; RD, 15.8% [95% CI, 13.1%-18.5%]; RR, 2.0 [95% CI, 1.7-2.4]). The proportion of patients with low ferritin levels was significantly greater in the surgical group (26% vs 12%, P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with severe obesity followed up for a median of 6.5 years, bariatric surgery compared with medical treatment was associated with a clinically important increased risk for complications, as well as lower risks of obesity-related comorbidities. The risk for complications should be considered in the decision-making process.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bariatric Surgery
Obesity, Morbid/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression/complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications
Female
Ferritins/blood
Humans
Hypertension/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid/drug therapy
Obesity, Morbid/surgery
Remission Induction
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:9007-73-2 (Ferritins)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.21055

  2 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29340678
[Au] Autor:Ikramuddin S; Korner J; Lee WJ; Thomas AJ; Connett JE; Bantle JP; Leslie DB; Wang Q; Inabnet WB; Jeffery RW; Chong K; Chuang LM; Jensen MD; Vella A; Ahmed L; Belani K; Billington CJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
[Ti] Title:Lifestyle Intervention and Medical Management With vs Without Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Control of Hemoglobin A1c, LDL Cholesterol, and Systolic Blood Pressure at 5 Years in the Diabetes Surgery Study.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(3):266-278, 2018 01 16.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is effective in achieving established diabetes treatment targets, but durability is unknown. Objective: To compare durability of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass added to intensive lifestyle and medical management in achieving diabetes control targets. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational follow-up of a randomized clinical trial at 4 sites in the United States and Taiwan, involving 120 participants who had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 8.0% or higher and a body mass index between 30.0 and 39.9 (enrolled between April 2008 and December 2011) were followed up for 5 years, ending in November 2016. Interventions: Lifestyle-intensive medical management intervention based on the Diabetes Prevention Program and LookAHEAD trials for 2 years, with and without (60 participants each) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery followed by observation to year 5. Main Outcomes and Measures: The American Diabetes Association composite triple end point of hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0%, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol less than 100 mg/dL, and systolic blood pressure less than 130 mm Hg at 5 years. Results: Of 120 participants who were initially randomized (mean age, 49 years [SD, 8 years], 72 women [60%]), 98 (82%) completed 5 years of follow-up. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups: mean (SD) body mass index 34.4 (3.2) for the lifestyle-medical management group and 34.9 (3.0) for the gastric bypass group and had hemoglobin A1c levels of 9.6% (1.2) and 9.6% (1.0), respectively. At 5 years, 13 participants (23%) in the gastric bypass group and 2 (4%) in the lifestyle-intensive medical management group had achieved the composite triple end point (difference, 19%; 95% CI, 4%-34%; P = .01). In the fifth year, 31 patients (55%) in the gastric bypass group vs 8 (14%) in the lifestyle-medical management group achieved an HbA1c level of less than 7.0% (difference, 41%; 95% CI, 19%-63%; P = .002). Gastric bypass had more serious adverse events than did the lifestyle-medical management intervention, 66 events vs 38 events, most frequently gastrointestinal events and surgical complications such as strictures, small bowel obstructions, and leaks. Gastric bypass had more parathyroid hormone elevation but no difference in B12 deficiency. Conclusions and Relevance: In extended follow-up of obese adults with type 2 diabetes randomized to adding gastric bypass compared with lifestyle and intensive medical management alone, there remained a significantly better composite triple end point in the surgical group at 5 years. However, because the effect size diminished over 5 years, further follow-up is needed to understand the durability of the improvement. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00641251.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gastric Bypass
Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cholesterol, LDL/blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents
Life Style
Middle Aged
Taiwan
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; COMMENT
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cholesterol, LDL); 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A); 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.20813

  3 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29340676
[Au] Autor:Salminen P; Helmiö M; Ovaska J; Juuti A; Leivonen M; Peromaa-Haavisto P; Hurme S; Soinio M; Nuutila P; Victorzon M
[Ad] Address:Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy vs Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass on Weight Loss at 5 Years Among Patients With Morbid Obesity: The SLEEVEPASS Randomized Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(3):241-254, 2018 01 16.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for treatment of morbid obesity has increased substantially despite the lack of long-term results compared with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Objective: To determine whether laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are equivalent for weight loss at 5 years in patients with morbid obesity. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Sleeve vs Bypass (SLEEVEPASS) multicenter, multisurgeon, open-label, randomized clinical equivalence trial was conducted from March 2008 until June 2010 in Finland. The trial enrolled 240 morbidly obese patients aged 18 to 60 years, who were randomly assigned to sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass with a 5-year follow-up period (last follow-up, October 14, 2015). Interventions: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (n = 121) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 119). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was weight loss evaluated by percentage excess weight loss. Prespecified equivalence margins for the clinical significance of weight loss differences between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy were -9% to +9% excess weight loss. Secondary end points included resolution of comorbidities, improvement of quality of life (QOL), all adverse events (overall morbidity), and mortality. Results: Among 240 patients randomized (mean age, 48 [SD, 9] years; mean baseline body mass index, 45.9, [SD, 6.0]; 69.6% women), 80.4% completed the 5-year follow-up. At baseline, 42.1% had type 2 diabetes, 34.6% dyslipidemia, and 70.8% hypertension. The estimated mean percentage excess weight loss at 5 years was 49% (95% CI, 45%-52%) after sleeve gastrectomy and 57% (95% CI, 53%-61%) after gastric bypass (difference, 8.2 percentage units [95% CI, 3.2%-13.2%], higher in the gastric bypass group) and did not meet criteria for equivalence. Complete or partial remission of type 2 diabetes was seen in 37% (n = 15/41) after sleeve gastrectomy and in 45% (n = 18/40) after gastric bypass (P > .99). Medication for dyslipidemia was discontinued in 47% (n = 14/30) after sleeve gastrectomy and 60% (n = 24/40) after gastric bypass (P = .15) and for hypertension in 29% (n = 20/68) and 51% (n = 37/73) (P = .02), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in QOL between groups (P = .85) and no treatment-related mortality. At 5 years the overall morbidity rate was 19% (n = 23) for sleeve gastrectomy and 26% (n = 31) for gastric bypass (P = .19). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with morbid obesity, use of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy compared with use of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass did not meet criteria for equivalence in terms of percentage excess weight loss at 5 years. Although gastric bypass compared with sleeve gastrectomy was associated with greater percentage excess weight loss at 5 years, the difference was not statistically significant, based on the prespecified equivalence margins. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00793143.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gastrectomy
Gastric Bypass
Laparoscopy
Obesity, Morbid/surgery
Weight Loss
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrectomy/adverse effects
Gastrectomy/methods
Gastric Bypass/adverse effects
Gastric Bypass/methods
Humans
Hyperlipidemias/complications
Hypertension/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid/complications
Obesity, Morbid/physiopathology
Postoperative Complications
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; EQUIVALENCE TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.20313

  4 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29297078
[Au] Autor:Knip M; Åkerblom HK; Al Taji E; Becker D; Bruining J; Castano L; Danne T; de Beaufort C; Dosch HM; Dupre J; Fraser WD; Howard N; Ilonen J; Konrad D; Kordonouri O; Krischer JP; Lawson ML; Ludvigsson J; Madacsy L; Mahon JL; Ormisson A; Palmer JP; Pozzilli P; Savilahti E; Serrano-Rios M; Songini M; Taback S; Vaarala O; White NH; Virtanen SM; Wasikowa R; Writing Group for the TRIGR Study Group
[Ad] Address:University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Hydrolyzed Infant Formula vs Conventional Formula on Risk of Type 1 Diabetes: The TRIGR Randomized Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(1):38-48, 2018 01 02.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Early exposure to complex dietary proteins may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes in children with genetic disease susceptibility. There are no intact proteins in extensively hydrolyzed formulas. Objective: To test the hypothesis that weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed formula decreases the cumulative incidence of type 1 diabetes in young children. Design, Setting, and Participants: An international double-blind randomized clinical trial of 2159 infants with human leukocyte antigen-conferred disease susceptibility and a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes recruited from May 2002 to January 2007 in 78 study centers in 15 countries; 1081 were randomized to be weaned to the extensively hydrolyzed casein formula and 1078 to a conventional formula. The follow-up of the participants ended on February 28, 2017. Interventions: The participants received either a casein hydrolysate or a conventional adapted cow's milk formula supplemented with 20% of the casein hydrolysate. The minimum duration of study formula exposure was 60 days by 6 to 8 months of age. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcome was type 1 diabetes diagnosed according to World Health Organization criteria. Secondary outcomes included age at diabetes diagnosis and safety (adverse events). Results: Among 2159 newborn infants (1021 female [47.3%]) who were randomized, 1744 (80.8%) completed the trial. The participants were observed for a median of 11.5 years (quartile [Q] 1-Q3, 10.2-12.8). The absolute risk of type 1 diabetes was 8.4% among those randomized to the casein hydrolysate (n = 91) vs 7.6% among those randomized to the conventional formula (n = 82) (difference, 0.8% [95% CI, -1.6% to 3.2%]). The hazard ratio for type 1 diabetes adjusted for human leukocyte antigen risk group, duration of breastfeeding, duration of study formula consumption, sex, and region while treating study center as a random effect was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8 to 1.5; P = .46). The median age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was similar in the 2 groups (6.0 years [Q1-Q3, 3.1-8.9] vs 5.8 years [Q1-Q3, 2.6-9.1]; difference, 0.2 years [95% CI, -0.9 to 1.2]). Upper respiratory infections were the most common adverse event reported (frequency, 0.48 events/year in the hydrolysate group and 0.50 events/year in the control group). Conclusions and Relevance: Among infants at risk for type 1 diabetes, weaning to a hydrolyzed formula compared with a conventional formula did not reduce the cumulative incidence of type 1 diabetes after median follow-up for 11.5 years. These findings do not support a need to revise the dietary recommendations for infants at risk for type 1 diabetes. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00179777.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Caseins
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/prevention & control
Infant Formula
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology
Disease-Free Survival
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutrition Policy
Risk
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Caseins); 65072-00-6 (casein hydrolysate)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180104
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.19826

  5 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29505512
[Au] Autor:Acosta T; Barengo NC; Arrieta A; Ricaurte C; Tuomilehto JO
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health, Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:A demonstration area for type 2 diabetes prevention in Barranquilla and Juan Mina (Colombia): Baseline characteristics of the study participants.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9285, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Type 2 diabetes (T2D) imposes a heavy public health burden in both developed and developing countries. It is necessary to understand the effect of T2D in different settings and population groups. This report aimed to present baseline characteristics of study participants in the demonstration area for the "Type 2 Diabetes Prevention in Barranquilla and Juan Mina" (DEMOJUAN) project after randomization and to compare their fasting and 2-hour glucose levels according to lifestyle and T2D risk factor levels.The DEMOJUAN project is a randomized controlled field trial. Study participants were recruited from study sites using population-wide screening using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire. All volunteers with FINDRISC of ≥13 points were invited to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Participant inclusion criteria for the upcoming field trial were either FINDRISC of ≥13 points and 2-hour post-challenge glucose level of 7.0 to 11.0 mmol/L or FINDRISC of ≥13 points and fasting plasma glucose level of 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L. Lifestyle habits and risk factors for T2D were assessed by trained interviewers using a validated questionnaire.Among the 14,193 participants who completed the FINDRISC questionnaire, 35% (n = 4915) had a FINDRISC score of ≥13 points and 47% (n = 2306) agreed to undergo the OGTT. Approximately, 33% (n = 772) of participants underwent the OGTT and met the entry criteria; these participants were randomized into 3 groups. There were no statistically significant differences found in anthropometric or lifestyle risk factors, distribution of the glucose metabolism categories, or other diabetes risk factors between the 3 groups (P > .05). Women with a past history of hyperglycaemia had significantly higher fasting glucose levels than those without previous hyperglycaemia (103 vs 99 mg/dL; P < .05).Lifestyle habits and risk factors were evenly distributed among the 3 study groups. No differences were found in fasting or 2-hour glucose levels among different lifestyle or risk factor categories with the exception of body mass index, past history of hyperglycaemia, and age of ≥64 years in women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01296100 (2/12/2011; Clinical trials.gov).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose
Colombia
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009285

  6 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29439603
[Au] Autor:Doggrell SA
[Ad] Address:a Faculty of Health , Queensland University of Technology , Brisbane , Australia.
[Ti] Title:Sgemaglutide in type 2 diabetes - is it the best glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1R agonist)?
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol;14(3):371-377, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7607
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced by the gut, and in a glucose-dependent manner stimulates insulin secretion while inhibiting glucagon secretion, reduces appetite and energy intake, and delays gastric emptying. The GLP-1R agonist semaglutide has recently been registered to treat type 2 diabetes. Area covered: This review is of semaglutide in type 2 diabetes, and considers which properties of this GLP-1R agonist, may be responsible for its clinical outcome benefits . Expert opinion: The pharmacokinetics of semaglutide make it ideal for once-weekly dosing. SUSTAIN 6 (Trial to Evaluate Cardiovascular and Other Long-term Outcomes With Semaglutide in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes) showed that semaglutide 0.5 or 1 mg subcutaneously once-weekly reduced cardiovascular outcomes in subjects with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or risk, mean age 65 years, baseline HbA1c 8.7% and mean body weight of 92 kg. Although, semaglutide may be a useful drug in this population, it increased retinopathy to a small extent and this needs further investigation. Also, it is not known whether semaglutide will improve cardiovascular outcomes in other populations including those with lower ages, HbA1c values, and body weights similar to those included in the unsuccessful clinical outcome trials with the GLP-1R agonists, lixisenatide and exenatide.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy
Glucagon-Like Peptides/administration & dosage
Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor/agonists
Glucagon-Like Peptides/pharmacokinetics
Glucagon-Like Peptides/pharmacology
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacokinetics
Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology
Insulin/secretion
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor); 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Insulin); 53AXN4NNHX (semaglutide); 62340-29-8 (Glucagon-Like Peptides)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17425255.2018.1441286

  7 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29414690
[Au] Autor:Li X; Lin Z; Zhan X; Gao J; Sun L; Cao Y; Qiu H
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, PR China; Department of Pharmacology, The State-Province Key Laboratories of Biomedicine-Pharmaceutics of China, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Research, Ministry of Education, Harbin Medical Un
[Ti] Title:RNA-seq analysis of the transcriptome of the liver of cynomolgus monkeys with type 2 diabetes.
[So] Source:Gene;651:118-125, 2018 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Genetic and environmental factors such as high-fat diet are involved in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Cynomolgus monkey shares similar genetic makeup, tissue structures, physiology and metabolic function to human. This study aimed to establish T2DM model in cynomolgus monkey and compare expression profiles of hepatic genes and their associated pathways in normal cynomolgus monkeys and those with T2DM. We employed RNA-seq technique and identified 1451 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.1% between normal and T2DM animals. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that DEGs were associated with 12 KEGG pathways (P < 0.05). Two of these pathways were associated with metabolism and five were related to immunity. Unexpected, we found ECM-receptor interaction pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that three major pathways may be implicated in the development of T2DM, including steroid biosynthesis, immune response and ECM. Further characterization of these pathways may provide new targets for the prevention and therapy of T2DM.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/veterinary
Liver/metabolism
Macaca fascicularis/genetics
Monkey Diseases/genetics
Transcriptome
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Ontology
Male
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Monkey Diseases/immunology
Monkey Diseases/metabolism
Sequence Analysis, RNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29408271
[Au] Autor:Ben Khelifa S; Martinez R; Dandana A; Khochtali I; Ferchichi S; Castaño L
[Ad] Address:Unit of Clinical and Molecular Biology/UR17ES29, Faculty of Pharmacy, Monastir, Tunisia. Electronic address: souhaira34@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) in Tunisia: Low frequencies of GCK and HNF1A mutations.
[So] Source:Gene;651:44-48, 2018 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance, an early clinical onset and a primary defect in ß-cell function. Mutations in the GCK and HNF1A genes are the most common cause of MODY among Caucasians. The etiology of MODY in Tunisia stills a challenge for researchers. The aim of this study was to screen for mutations in GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes in North African Tunisians subjects, in whom the clinical profile was very suggestive of MODY. A total of 23 unrelated patients, with clinical presentation of MODY were tested for mutations in GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes, using Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (DHPLC), Multiplex Ligation-depend Probe Amplification (MLPA) and sequencing analysis. We identified the previously reported mutation c-169C > T in one patient as well as a new mutation c-457C > T in two unrelated patients. No mutations were detected in the HNF1A and INS genes. Despite restrictive clinical criteria used for selecting patients in this study, the most common genes known for MODY do not explain the majority of cases in Tunisians. This suggests that there are others candidate or unidentified genes contributing to the etiology of MODY in Tunisians families.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics
Glucokinase/genetics
Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha/genetics
Mutation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Gene Frequency
Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/genetics
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Tunisia
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HNF1A protein, human); 0 (HNF4A protein, human); 0 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha); 0 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4); EC 2.7.1.2 (Glucokinase); EC 2.7.11.1 (Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases); EC 2.7.11.1 (germinal center kinases)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29385209
[Au] Autor:Sun W; Yao S; Tang J; Liu S; Chen J; Deng D; Zeng C
[Ad] Address:Department of Geriatrics, the First People's Hospital of Xiangtan City, Xiangtan, PR, China.
[Ti] Title:Integrative analysis of super enhancer SNPs for type 2 diabetes.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0192105, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Clinical studies in type 2 diabetes (T2D) primarily focused on the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in protein-coding regions. Recently, the SNPs located in noncoding regions have also been recognized to play an important role in disease susceptibility. The super enhancer is a cluster of transcriptional enhancers located in noncoding regions. It plays a critical role in cell-type specific gene expression. However, the exact mechanism of the super enhancer SNPs for T2D remains unclear. In this study, we integrated genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and T2D cell/tissue-specific histone modification ChIP-seq data to identify T2D-associated SNPs in super enhancer, followed by comprehensive bioinformatics analyses to further explore the functional importance of these SNPs. We identified several interesting T2D super enhancer SNPs. Interesting, most of them were clustered within the same or neighboring super enhancers. A number of SNPs are involved in chromatin interactive regulation and/or potentially influence the binding affinity of transcription factors. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed a significant enrichment in several well-known signaling pathways and regulatory process, e.g. WNT signaling pathway, which plays a key role in T2D metabolism. Our results highlighted the potential functional importance of T2D super enhancer SNPs, which may yield novel insights into the pathogenesis of T2D.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics
Enhancer Elements, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Protein Interaction Maps
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192105

  10 / 170154 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29381773
[Au] Autor:Moradi N; Fadaei R; Emamgholipour S; Kazemian E; Panahi G; Vahedi S; Saed L; Fallah S
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Association of circulating CTRP9 with soluble adhesion molecules and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0192159, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9) is a paralogue of adiponectin with known favorable effects on lipid and glucose metabolism. A potential role of CTRP9 for regulation of endothelium function has been suggested by previous studies. However, no studies have examined the relation between serum CTRP9 levels and adhesion molecules in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD). The present study was conducted on 337 subjects who underwent coronary angiography and were categorized into four groups according to the presence of CAD and T2DM (control, CAD, T2DM and CAD+T2DM). Serum levels of CTRP9, adiponectin, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured. It was found that the circulating CTRP9 levels were independently associated with increased risk of CAD and T2DM in addition to elevated levels of serum CTRP9 in CAD, T2DM and CAD+T2DM groups. A significant association of serum CTRP9 levels with adhesion molecules in CAD and T2DM patients as well as serum TNF-α levels in CAD individuals was noted. A significant relation between the circulating levels of CTRP9 and HOMA-IR in T2DM subjects was also observed. The results revealed increased circulating levels of CTRP9 in T2DM and CAD individuals which suggests a compensatory response to insulin resistance, inflammatory milieu and endothelial dysfunction; however, more studies are needed to confirm this.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adiponectin/blood
Biomarkers/blood
Cell Adhesion Molecules/blood
Coronary Artery Disease/blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood
Glycoproteins/blood
Inflammation Mediators/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adiponectin); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (C1QTNF9B protein, human); 0 (Cell Adhesion Molecules); 0 (Glycoproteins); 0 (Inflammation Mediators)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192159


page 1 of 17016 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information