Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lactose and Intolerance [Words]
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[PMID]: 29181545
[Au] Autor:Schnedl WJ; Lackner S; Enko D; Schenk M; Mangge H; Holasek SJ
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathophysiology, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 31a, 8010, Graz, Austria. w.schnedl@dr-schnedl.at.
[Ti] Title:Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: people without celiac disease avoiding gluten-is it due to histamine intolerance?
[So] Source:Inflamm Res;67(4):279-284, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1420-908X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Food intolerance/malabsorption is caused by food ingredients, carbohydrates (mainly lactose and fructose), proteins (gluten), and biogenic amines (histamine) which cause nonspecific gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Here we focus on possible etiologic factors of intolerance/malabsorption especially in people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or the so-called people without celiac disease avoiding gluten (PWCDAG) and histamine intolerance. METHODS: Recognizing the recently described symptoms of NCGS (PWCDAG) we review correlations and parallels to histamine intolerance (HIT). RESULTS: We show that intestinal and extra-intestinal NCGS (PWCDAG) symptoms are very similar to those which can be found in histamine intolerance. CONCLUSIONS: After a detailed diagnostic workup for all possible etiologic factors in every patient, a targeted dietary intervention for single or possibly combined intolerance/malabsorption might be more effective than a short-term diet low in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) or the untargeted uncritical use of gluten-free diets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00011-017-1117-4

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[PMID]: 29505134
[Au] Autor:Yerushalmy-Feler A; Soback H; Lubetzky R; Ben-Tov A; Dali-Levy M; Galai T; Cohen S
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit"Dana-Dwek" Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, Tel Aviv, 6423906, Israel.
[Ti] Title:One-third of children with lactose intolerance managed to achieve a regular diet at the three-year follow-up point.
[So] Source:Acta Paediatr;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1651-2227
[Cp] Country of publication:Norway
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: This study described outcomes following treatment for lactose intolerance, which is common in children. METHODS: The medical records of children aged 6-18 years who underwent lactose hydrogen breath testing at Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel, from August 2012-August 2014 were analysed. We compared 154 children with gastrointestinal symptoms and positive lactose hydrogen breath tests to 49 children with negative test results. RESULTS: Of the 154 children in the study group, 89 (57.8%) were advised to follow a lactose restricted diet, 32 (20.8%) were advised to avoid lactose completely, 18 (11.7%) were instructed to use substitute enzymes and 15 (9.7%) did not receive specific recommendations. Only 11 patients (7.1%) received recommendations to add calcium-rich foods or calcium supplements to their diet. Lactose reintroduction was attempted in 119/154 patients (77.3%), and 65/154 (42.2%) experienced clinical relapses. At the final follow up of 3.3 years, 62.3% of the study children were still observing a restricted diet. Older children and those who were symptomatic during lactose hydrogen breath testing were more likely to be on a prolonged restricted diet. CONCLUSION: Our long-term follow up of lactose intolerant children showed that only a third were able to achieve a regular diet. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/apa.14305

  3 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29311037
[Au] Autor:Boney A; Elser HE; Silver HJ
[Ti] Title:Relationships among Dietary Intakes and Persistent Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients Receiving Enzyme Treatment for Genetic Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency.
[So] Source:J Acad Nutr Diet;118(3):440-447, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2212-2672
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sucrose-isomaltase deficiency (SID) remains underdiagnosed. Absent or reduced enzyme activity promotes diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and flatulence from undigested and malabsorbed disaccharides. Frequency and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms may be associated with the type of carbohydrates consumed. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the dietary intakes of patients treated with sacrosidase (Sucraid; QOL Medical) for SID and determine relationships between type of carbohydrates, sacrosidase dose, and gastrointestinal symptoms. DESIGN: A prospective 30-day observational study. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: Forty-nine patients treated with sacrosidase for ≥3 months were recruited from the enzyme manufacturer's nationwide clinical database between November 2014 and August 2015. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dietary energy and nutrient intakes reported during 24-hour diet recall interviews, frequency and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and sacrosidase dose. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Relationships between nutrient intakes, sacrosidase dose, and GI symptoms were evaluated using Spearman ρ correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Sacrosidase dose averaged 5.2±3.1 mL/day. Participants reported 1.3±0.9 bowel movements daily. Having less frequent GI symptoms was associated with higher sacrosidase intake. Energy intakes averaged 1,562.5±411.5 kcal/day in children, 1,964.7±823.6 kcal/day in adolescents, and 1,952.6±546.5 kcal/day in adults. Macronutrient composition averaged 44% carbohydrate, 39% fat, and 17% protein. Average carbohydrate composition was 35% starch, 8% fiber, and 59% sugars. Sucrose and fructose intakes were not associated with GI symptoms. Lactose intake was associated with diarrhea. Maltose intake was associated with nausea, distension, and reflux. CONCLUSIONS: Intakes were lower in carbohydrates and higher in fat compared with the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. Sucrose and fructose intakes were not associated with GI symptoms. Higher maltose and lactose intakes were associated with GI symptom frequency and severity. These findings provide evidence to guide nutrition counseling for patients treated for SID.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425071
[Au] Autor:Oak SJ; Jha R
[Ad] Address:a Department of Human Nutrition , Food and Animal Sciences, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa , Honolulu , HI , USA.
[Ti] Title:The effects of probiotics in lactose intolerance: A systematic review.
[So] Source:Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr;:1-9, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1549-7852
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Over 60 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose due to low levels of lactase enzyme activity. Probiotics are live bacteria or yeast that supplements the gastrointestinal flora. Studies have shown that probiotics exhibit various health beneficial properties such as improvement of intestinal health, enhancement of the immune responses, and reduction of serum cholesterol. Accumulating evidence has shown that probiotic bacteria in fermented and unfermented milk products can be used to alleviate the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance (LI). In this systematic review, the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of LI was evaluated using 15 randomized double-blind studies. Eight probiotic strains with the greatest number of proven benefits were studied. Results showed varying degrees of efficacy but an overall positive relationship between probiotics and lactose intolerance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/10408398.2018.1425977

  5 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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Simón, Daniel
Lunge, Vagner Ricardo
Silveira, Themis Reverbel da
SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 29384557
[Au] Autor:Wortmann AC; Simon D; Mazzoleni LE; Sander GB; Francesconi CFM; Nabinger DD; Grott CS; Rech TF; Mazzoleni F; Lunge VR; Bona LR; Milbradt TC; Silveira TRD
[Ad] Address:Postgraduate Program in Sciences of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The association between adult-type hypolactasia and symptoms of functional dyspepsia.
[So] Source:Genet Mol Biol;:0, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1415-4757
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Functional dyspepsia and lactose intolerance (adult-type hypolactasia, ATH) are common conditions that may coexist or even be confounded. Their clinical presentation can be similar, however, lactose intolerance does not form part of the diagnostic investigation of functional dyspepsia. Studies on the association between functional dyspepsia and ATH are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate whether ATH is associated with symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Patients fulfilling the Rome III diagnostic criteria for functional dyspepsia underwent genetic testing for ATH. Dyspeptic symptoms were evaluated and scored according to a validated questionnaire. The diagnostic criteria for ATH was a CC genotype for the -13910C/T polymorphism, located upstream of the lactase gene. The mean scores for dyspeptic symptoms were compared between patients with ATH and those with lactase persistence. A total of 197 functional dyspeptic patients were included in the study. Mean age was 47.7 years and 82.7% patients were women. Eighty-eight patients (44.7%) had a diagnosis of ATH. Abdominal bloating scores were higher in ATH patients compared to the lactase persistent patients (P=0.014). The remaining dyspeptic symptom scores were not significantly different between the two groups. The study results demonstrate an association between ATH and bloating in patients with functional dyspepsia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29303109
[Au] Autor:Thrastardottir AR; Thordardottir FR; Torfadottir J
[Ad] Address:Centre for Public Health Sciences.
[Ti] Title:[Protocols Related to Food Allergies and Intolerances in Preschools in Reykjavik, Iceland].
[So] Source:Laeknabladid;104(1):11-17, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0023-7213
[Cp] Country of publication:Iceland
[La] Language:ice
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to explore prevalence of food allergies and intolerances among children in preschools in Reykjavik, Iceland. Also, to investigate how well preschools maintain a safe environment for children with food allergies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2014, a questionnaire designed specifically for this study, was sent to 65 preschools. Forty-nine participated (75%) representing a total of 4225 children. Prevalence of food allergy and intolerance was determined based on medical certificates from physi-cians delivered to the preschools. Descriptive statistics were used to assess whether there were protocols related to food allergy, and if there was a difference between schools based on staff's education and number of children. RESULTS: The prevalence of documented food allergies/intolerances in children aged 2-6 years was 5%, 1% had severe allergy and 1% had multiple food allergies. Lactose intolerance was most frequent (2%), then milk allergy (2%) and egg allergy (1%). Only 41% preschools had a protocol that was activated if food with an allergen was accidentally given. Moreover, only 55% of preschools with children with severe -allergy reported all of their staff to have knowledge of symptoms related to anaphylaxis and only 64% were trained to respond to an anaphylactic shock. The education of preschool principals, kitchen employees and number of children in preschool were not related to having an active protocol at site. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of food allergy and intolerance was 5% in preschools in Reykjavik. Strategy for an active protocol related to food allergy was lacking in 59% of pre-schools.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180105
[Lr] Last revision date:180105
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17992/lbl.2018.01.168

  7 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29282192
[Au] Autor:Kramer ON; Barkoff MS; Hernandez C
[Ad] Address:University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
[Ti] Title:Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.
[So] Source:Skinmed;15(6):477-479, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1540-9740
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 51-year-old woman with a history of asthma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis presented to the dermatology service with a chief complaint of "itchy bumpy rashes" that persisted beyond 24 hours. She noted that, 3 days prior to the onset of urticaria, a pyrroloquinoline quinone supplement had been started. The urticaria was accompanied by variable episodes of transient facial swelling and difficulty breathing. The patient noted that exposure to fish, nuts, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs triggered facial swelling. Other reported findings included a 5-year history of diarrhea, sense of memory deterioration, concentration difficulties, and clinical manifestations of anomic aphasia. Although her allergy testing was "negative," she had been given the diagnoses of lactose intolerance and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Laboratory studies on initial presentation were significant for a positive history of antithyroperoxidase antibodies and elevated total complement activity. Medications included budesonide/formoterol, fluticasone/salmeterol, levothyroxine, albuterol, and fexofenadine 180 mg twice daily. Although her "rash" had initially responded to fexofenadine, it soon became refractory to treatment. Her family history was significant only for thyroid disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171228
[Lr] Last revision date:171228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29266556
[Au] Autor:Rojo C; Jaime F; Azócar L; Hernández C; Villagrán A; Miquel JF; Arancibia G
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Concordance between Lactose Quick Test, hydrogen-methane breath test and genotyping for the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in children.
[So] Source:Neurogastroenterol Motil;, 2017 Dec 21.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2982
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lactose intolerance is a frequent condition in certain populations. Different methods for diagnosis exist. There is scarce literature regarding Lactose Quick Test (LQT) and concordance with other methods for lactose intolerance diagnosis in children. METHODS: Prospectively, we included children who underwent gastroduodenoscopy for evaluation of abdominal pain. We obtained a duodenal sample for LQT and blood sample for genetic test to evaluate LCT C>T variant. Later, patients underwent breath test with lactose, to evaluate malabsorption. We evaluated the concordance between the three different tests. KEY RESULTS: We included 46 patients, 56.5% women. Mean age was 13.2 years (range 9-18 years). 66.6% of patients had lactose malabsorption according to breath test; 64.4% were homozygous CC; and 91.3% had hypolactasia (mild or severe) according to LQT. None of the patients with normolactasia had altered breath test. Genetic test had a substantial agreement (k = 0.675) with breath test and fair agreement (k = 0.301) with LQT. LQT had fair agreement (k = 0.348) with breath test. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: Genetic test had better concordance with breath test than LQT to diagnose lactose malabsorption, however, none of the patients with normal LQT had lactose malabsorption. In patients who undergo gastroduodenoscopy to study abdominal pain, it seems reasonable to perform LQT, and, in those with hypolactasia, to perform breath test.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171221
[Lr] Last revision date:171221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nmo.13271

  9 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29222879
[Au] Autor:Harvey L; Ludwig T; Hou AQ; Hock QS; Tan ML; Osatakul S; Bindels J; Muhardi L
[Ad] Address:Danone Nutricia Research, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence, cause and diagnosis of lactose intolerance in children aged 1-5 years: a systematic review of 1995-2015 literature.
[So] Source:Asia Pac J Clin Nutr;27(1):29-46, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0964-7058
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence, etiology, diagnosis of primary and secondary lactose intolerance (LI), including age of onset, among children 1-5 years of age. Suspected/perceived lactose intolerance can lead to dietary restrictions which may increase risk of future health issues. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: MEDLINE, CAB Abstract, and Embase were searched for articles published from January 1995-June 2015 related to lactose intolerance in young children. Authors independently screened titles/abstracts, full text articles, for eligibility against a priori inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed quality of the included studies. RESULTS: The search identified 579 articles; 20 studies, the majority of which were crosssectional, were included in the qualitative synthesis. Few studies reported prevalence of primary LI in children aged 1-5 years; those that did reported a range between 0-17.9%. Prevalence of secondary LI was 0-19%. Hydrogen breath test was the most common method used to diagnose LI. None of the included studies reported age of onset of primary LI. CONCLUSIONS: There is limited recent evidence on the prevalence of LI in this age group. The low number of studies and wide range of methodologies used to diagnose LI means that comparison and interpretation, particularly of geographical trends, is compromised. Current understanding appears to rely on data generated in the 1960/70s, with varied qualities of evidence. New, high quality studies are necessary to understand the true prevalence of LI. This review is registered with the International Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171209
[Lr] Last revision date:171209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.6133/apjcn.022017.05

  10 / 3380 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29159163
[Au] Autor:Gençdal G; Salman E; Özütemiz Ö; Akarca US
[Ad] Address:Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Izmir, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Association of LCT-13910 C/T Polymorphism and Colorectal Cancer.
[So] Source:Ann Coloproctol;33(5):169-172, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2287-9714
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: The activity of epithelial lactase (LCT) is associated with a polymorphism 13910 bp upstream in the lactase encoding gene. Because the association between the LCT-13910 polymorphism and the risk for colorectal cancer is not clear, we investigated the role of the LCT-13910 polymorphism as a potential risk factor for colorectal cancer and colorectal polyps in the Turkish population. Methods: One hundred sixty-six subjects (74 with polyps, 44 with colorectal cancer, 48 controls), who had undergone a total colonoscopy between January 2012 and November 2012 in our endoscopy unit were genotyped for the LCT-13910 polymorphism by using the polymerase chain reaction and minisequencing. Results: The CC genotype in the lactose gene 13910 locus, which is accepted as the genetic indicator of lactase deficiency, was determined as 83.7%. The CC genotype rate was determined as 89.1% in patients who had a history of lactose intolerance and 81.5% in those without a history of lactose intolerance (P = 0.236). No difference was detected between the patients who had colorectal polyp(s) and/or cancer and the controls with regard to the LCT-13910 polymorphism. No differences were determined between groups when they were compared with regard to the C or the T allele. Conclusion: No differences were detected between the patients who had colorectal polyp(s) and/or cancer and those with normal colonoscopy findings with regard to lactase gene polymorphisms. No differences were determined between the groups when they were compared with regard to the C or the T allele.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171123
[Lr] Last revision date:171123
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3393/ac.2017.33.5.169


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