Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lamiaceae [Words]
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[PMID]: 29477369
[Au] Autor:Odoh UE; Uzor PF; Eze CL; Akunne TC; Onyegbulam CM; Osadebe PO
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacognosy and Environmental Medicines, University of Nigeria, Nsukka 410001, Nigeria.
[Ti] Title:Medicinal plants used by the people of Nsukka Local Government Area, south-eastern Nigeria for the treatment of malaria: An ethnobotanical survey.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;218:1-15, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOBOTANICAL RELEVANCE: Malaria is a serious public health problem especially in sub-Saharan African countries such as Nigeria. The causative parasite is increasingly developing resistance to the existing drugs. There is urgent need for alternative and affordable therapy from medicinal plants which have been used by the indigenous people for many years. AIM OF STUDY: This study was conducted to document the medicinal plant species traditionally used by the people of Nsukka Local Government Area in south-eastern Nigeria for the treatment of malaria. METHODS: A total of 213 respondents, represented by women (59.2%) and men (40.8%), were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results were analysed and discussed in the context of previously published information on anti-malarial and phytochemical studies of the identified plants. RESULTS: The survey revealed that 50 plant species belonging to 30 botanical families were used in this region for the treatment of malaria. The most cited families were Apocynaceae (13.3%), Annonaceae (10.0%), Asteraceae (10.0%), Lamiaceae (10.0%), Poaceae (10.0%), Rubiaceae (10.0%) and Rutaceae (10.0%). The most cited plant species were Azadirachta indica (11.3%), Mangifera indica (9.1%), Carica papaya (8.5%), Cymbopogon citratus (8.5%) and Psidium guajava (8.5%). CONCLUSION: The present findings showed that the people of Nsukka use a large variety of plants for the treatment of malaria. The identified plants are currently undergoing screening for anti-malarial, toxicity and chemical studies in our laboratory.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29366765
[Au] Autor:Van Puyvelde L; Liu M; Veryser C; De Borggraeve WM; Mungarulire J; Mukazayire MJ; Luyten W
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Animal Physiology and Neurobiology Section, KU Leuven, Naamsestraat 59, box 2465, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Active principles of Tetradenia riparia. IV. Anthelmintic activity of 8(14),15-sandaracopimaradiene-7α,18-diol.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;216:229-232, 2018 Apr 24.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Tetradenia (T.) riparia (Hochst.) Codd (Lamiaceae), formerly known as Iboza riparia (Hochst.) N.E.Br., is one of the most frequently used medicinal plants in traditional Rwandese medicine. It was used as a remedy against a wide range of diseases including malaria, angina, yaws, dental abscesses, headache, worm infections and several kinds of fevers and aches. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study aims to identify the compounds active against helminths from Tetradenia riparia. METHODS: A bioassay-guided isolation of anthelmintic compounds from the leaves of Tetradenia riparia was performed using a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) testing model. RESULTS: The bioassay-guided isolation led to one active compound, i.e. 8(14),15-sandaracopimaradiene-7α,18-diol. Its IC value was 5.4 ± 0.9 µg/mL (17.8 ± 2.9 µM). CONCLUSIONS: We identified the bioactive compound from Tetradenia riparia responsible for its anthelmintic activity: 8(14),15-sandaracopimaradiene-7α,18-diol. Although the compound and several of its bioactivities have been described before, this is the first report of its anthelmintic effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29441920
[Ti] Title:Pancreatic lipase and -amylase inhibitory activities of plants used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(7):420-424, 2016 Jul 07.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To find new, plant based drugs for the treatment of obesity and/or diabetes mellitus type 2 through the inhibition of essential digestive enzymes, in vitro tests were carried out on selected plants or fungi with weight-reducing, blood glucose-reducing or related potential, used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Aqueous and methanolic extracts of 32 Chinese herbal medicines were assayed for their in vitro inhibitory activity against pancreatic lipase (PL) and α-amylase (PA). PL activity was measured by using an enzymatic in vitro assay based on the hydrolysis kinetics of an oleate ester of 4-methylumbelliferone. For the determination of α-amylase activity an enzyme assay based on the hydrolytic cleavage of a modified starch derivative was used. Our findings have shown that the methanolic extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. var. hirtus Regel (Lamiaceae) was a very effective PL inhibitor (IC50: 88.3±4.1 µg/mL). A high anti-amylase activity showed the methanolic extract of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim. (Curcurbitaceae, IC50: 248.8±67.3 µg/mL). This work provides a priority list of interesting plants for further study with respect to the treatment of obesity and associated metabolic diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lipase/antagonists & inhibitors
Pancreas/enzymology
Plants/chemistry
alpha-Amylases/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Fungi/chemistry
Hydrolysis
Hymecromone/chemistry
Kinetics
Lycopus/chemistry
Medicine, Chinese Traditional
Pancreas/drug effects
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Trichosanthes/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 3T5NG4Q468 (Hymecromone); EC 3.1.1.3 (Lipase); EC 3.2.1.1 (alpha-Amylases)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6569

  4 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29186299
[Au] Autor:Alonso C; Pérez R; Bazaga P; Medrano M; Herrera CM
[Ad] Address:Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientí?cas (CSIC), Avda. Américo Vespucio, Sevilla, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Within-plant variation in seed size and inflorescence fecundity is associated with epigenetic mosaicism in the shrub Lavandula latifolia (Lamiaceae).
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(1):153-160, 2018 Jan 25.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Sub-individual variation in traits of homologous structures has multiple ecological consequences for individuals and populations. Assessing the evolutionary significance of such effects requires an improved knowledge of the mechanisms underlying within-plant phenotypic heterogeneity. The hypothesis that continuous within-plant variation in some phenotypic traits can be associated with epigenetic mosaicism was examined. Methods: Fifteen individuals of the long-lived, evergreen Mediterranean shrub Lavandula latifolia were studied. Five widely spaced 'modules', each consisting of a single inflorescence plus all its subtending basal leaves, were collected from each shrub. Genomic DNA was extracted from leaf samples and genome-wide cytosine methylation determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with spectrofluorimetric detection. The number and mean mass of seeds produced were determined for each inflorescence. An assessment was made of whether (1) leaves from different modules in the same plant differed significantly in global DNA cytosine methylation, and (2) mosaicism in cytosine methylation contributed to explain variation across modules in number and size of seeds. Key Results: Leaves from different modules in the same plant differed in global DNA cytosine methylation. The magnitude of epigenetic mosaicism was substantial, as the variance in DNA methylation among modules of the same shrub was greater than the variance between individuals. Number and mean mass of seeds produced by individual inflorescences varied within plants and were quadratically related to cytosine methylation of subtending leaves, with an optimum at an intermediate methylation level (approx. 25 %). Conclusions: The results support a causal link between global cytosine methylation of leaves in a module and the size and numbers of seeds produced by the associated inflorescence. It is proposed that variation in global DNA methylation within L. latifolia shrubs may result from the concerted action of plant sectoriality and differential exposure of different plant parts to some environmental factor(s) with a capacity to induce durable epigenetic changes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx140

  5 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512375
[Au] Autor:Yazici S; Nacaroglu HT; Bahçeci Erdem S; Karaman S; Can D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, Balikesir University, Balikesir, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Angioedema Due to Lamiaceae Allergy.
[So] Source:Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol;17(1):97-99, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1735-1502
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present a 13-year-old male childallergic to three different plants (Salvia officinalis, Mentha piperita and Origanum onites L.) of Lamiaceae family. The patient developed angioedema 20-30 minutes after eating chicken meat with cheddar cheese. There was no history of allergy. Oral food challenge (OFC) with both cheddar cheese and chicken meat was negative. Skin tests for inhalant allergens were negative. 3 weeks later, the patient was admitted with angioedema after drinking sage tea. OFC with sage was applied and angioedema was observed. It was recognized that the first trigger, chicken meat with cheddar cheese, included oregano (Origanum onites L.). OFC for oregano was positive. Prick to prick test for Lamiaceae herbs (oregano, sage, mint) was performed. A positive reaction was observed only to mint. OFC was repeated with fresh mint and angioedema developed after 16 hours. Diagnose of Lamiaceae allergy is complicated and cross-sensitivity is common. Skin prick test (prick to prick)revealed a positive response only to mint but not to oregano and sage. Commercial radioallergosorbent (RAST) tests are available only for a few members of the family. Finally, thediagnose is based mainly on OFC. Spices from Lamiaceae group should be considered as potential triggers of allergic reactions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506390
[Au] Autor:Vyas P; Yadav DK; Khandelwal P
[Ad] Address:a Department of Chemistry , Mohanlal Sukhadia University , Udaipur , India.
[Ti] Title:Tectona grandis (teak) - A review on its phytochemical and therapeutic potential.
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-17, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tectona grandis Linn (Teak), is locally known as Sagwan, belongs to Lamiaceae family. It is one of the most valuable timber in the world, due to its beautiful surface and its resistance to termite and fungal damage. The main active ingredient compounds that are responsible for these action are tectoquinone, lapachol and deoxylapachol. Naphthoquinones, anthraquinones and isoprenoid quinones are abundant metabolites in teak. In addition to these, teak contains several other phytochemicals such as triterpenoids, steroids, lignans, fatty esters and phenolic compounds. Pharmacologically, the plant has been investigated for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, cytotoxic, analgesic, hypoglycemic, wound healing and antiplasmodial activities. The present review highlights the phytochemical and pharmacological aspects of teak.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2018.1440217

  7 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29504316
[Au] Autor:Pang HH; Jiang MF; Wang QH; Wang XY; Gao W; Tian ZH; Huang JM
[Ad] Address:School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100102, China.
[Ti] Title:Metabolic profile of danshen in rats by HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:J Zhejiang Univ Sci B;19(3):227-244, 2018 Mar..
[Is] ISSN:1862-1783
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Danshen, the dried root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae), is one of the traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) most commonly used for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known about the chemical and metabolic profiles of danshen in vitro or in vivo. In particular, more information is needed in relation to the 50% ethanol extracts usually used in danshen formulations such as Fufang Xueshuantong Capsules and Fufang Danshen tablets. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap) provides a sensitive and accurate method for analyzing the composition of samples. This method was used to determine the in vitro and in vivo chemical and metabolic profiles of danshen. Sixty-nine components of danshen extract and 118 components of danshen in rat plasma, urine, feces, and bile were unambiguously or tentatively identified. These results not only revealed the material composition of danshen, but also provided a comprehensive research approach for the identification of multi-constituents in TCMs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1631/jzus.B1700105

  8 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29448222
[Au] Autor:Knezevic P; Aleksic Sabo V; Simin N; Lesjak M; Mimica-Dukic N
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 3, 21 000 Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia. Electronic address: petar.knezevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs.
[Ti] Title:A colorimetric broth microdilution method for assessment of Helicobacter pylori sensitivity to antimicrobial agents.
[So] Source:J Pharm Biomed Anal;152:271-278, 2018 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-264X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Helicobacter pylori is a major infective etiological agent of the upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. The bacterium exhibits resistance to various conventional antibiotics, being usually challenging for eradication. Since there is an urge to consider alternative therapeutic strategies, the aim of the study was to examine selected essential oils of plants belonging to families Cupressaceae (Juniperus communis) and Lamiaceae (Hyssopus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Melissa officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum and Thymus serpyllum) against H. pylori, using an improved microdilution broth method. The oils were examined in concentration range from 0.03 to 4 µL/mL. The method comprises Brain-heart infusion broth supplemented with yeast extract, horse serum and IsoVitaleX. After 3 day incubation, an equal volume of double strengthen Christensen's urea was added into each well and incubated for additional 4 h. In wells with present H. pylori, the medium changed color from yellow to purple, allowing MIC determination even without a microtitre plate reader. The microtitre format method is convenient as it is less expensive, easier to perform and requires less amount of an anti-H. pylori agent. The improved method enhances specificity to H. pylori, as fast urease activity is almost an exclusive property of this bacterium. The application of the second step incubation with Christensen's urea decreases the possibility of false positive/negative results due to contaminant growth or commonly poor H. pylori growth. Among the examined oils, J. communis, H. officinalis and O. basilicum were not active with the highest applied concentrations, while the most active was T. serpyllum, with MIC 2.0-4.0 µL/mL. This is the first report on essential oils activity of T. serpyllum and H. officinalis against H. pylori.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29447950
[Au] Autor:Maleki T; Akhani H
[Ad] Address:Halophytes and C(4) Plants Research Laboratory, Department of Plant Science, School of Biology, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal studies in Baluchi tribes: A case study in Mt. Taftan, southeastern Iran.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;217:163-177, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOBOTANICAL RELEVANCE: From ancient times, the applied use of herbs has been common among indigenous people throughout the world. The present survey is a regional ethnobotanical study of Baluchi tribes living in the Mt. Taftan area, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran. The aim of this study was to document all traditional knowledge and analyze the medicinal plants used in area and also to identify significant plant species for future pharmacological study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Local knowledge was obtained through semi structured and open interviews, in which 51 informants were interviewed. Data were analyzed with Informant Agreement Relative (IAR) and Frequency of Citation (FC) indices. RESULTS: A total number of 106 taxa of medicinal plants were collected from ten villages from the surrounding plains and highlands of Mt. Taftan, out of 446 plant taxa collected or reported as native in the area. Most plants belong to the Irano-Turanian phytogeographical region in which Asteraceae (15%), Lamiaceae (11%), Fabaceae (8%), Rosaceae (7%), Apiaceae (7%) and Brassicaceae (5%) are those predominantly used. The regression analysis shows that families Apiaceae, Lamiaceae, Solanaceae and Rosaceae are more highly used as medicinal than species rich families such as Asteraceae and Fabaceae, which are the richest families in the Iranian flora. The highest FC was recorded for Artemisia spp. (41) and Berberis integerrima (40). The highest IAR Index was obtained for stings (0.86), followed by disorders in the circulatory system (0.7), dental problems (0.70) and injuries (0.69). Comparing our data with major ethnobotanical references in Iran revealed that medicinal applications of 34 taxa have not been cited, including Hyoscyamus malekianus, a local endemic plant using for ailments of toothache and worms. The toxicity of the endemic Semenovia suffruticosa is also reported. CONCLUSION: As a result of this study we conclude that Taftan area harbours many plant species for which indigenous knowledge provides a background of medicinal importance. The high percentage of medicinal plants proportional to the native flora is 23.8%, compared to the world percentage of 17.1%, is an indication of the rich knowledge and relationship of isolated Baluchi tribes living in Mt. Taftan to the local flora growing in their surroundings. This rich knowledge should be highly regarded as a cultural and ethnobotanical heritage. Furthermore, ethnobotanical results show some weak interrelation between Baluchi tribes living in Iran and Pakistan, probably because of a different flora and/or unfavourable environmental conditions and perhaps local conflicts which might have reduced active cultural exchange.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3100 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29391002
[Au] Autor:Kahaliw W; Hellman B; Engidawork E
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, P. O. Box: 196, Gondar, Ethiopia. wubayehu.kahaliw@uog.edu.et.
[Ti] Title:Genotoxicity study of Ethiopian medicinal plant extracts on HepG2 cells.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):45, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Most of herbal medicines are used without any standard safety and toxicological trials although common assumption is that these products are nontoxic. However, this assumption is incorrect and dangerous, so toxicological studies should be done for herbal drugs. Although Pterolobium stellatum, Otostegia integrifolia and Vernonia amygdalina root extracts are frequently used in Ethiopian traditional medicine, there are no evidences of their active toxic compounds. Therefore, we made an effort to assess probable genotoxic effect of these plant extracts on DNA of human hematoma (HepG ) cells using alkaline comet assay. METHODS: Genotoxic effects of extracts were evaluated using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) method on HepG cell. Regarding comet data, the average mean tail intensities (TI) from each individual experiment and treatment (usually at least 3 cultures/treatment) were pooled and the average mean TI was used as an indicator of DNA damage and the standard error of mean (SEM) as the measure of variance. RESULTS: DNA damage in the form of comet tail has been observed for 1 and 0.5 mg/ml P. stellatum chloroform and 80% methanol extracts on HepG cells, respectively. The chloroform extract of P. stellatum showed increased tail DNA percentage in a concentration dependent manner. Comet tail length in the chloroform P. stellatum extract treated cells (1 mg/ml) was significantly higher by 89% (p < 0.05) compared to vehicle treated controls. The rest of test extracts seemed to be without genotoxic effect up to a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that two extracts from one plant evaluated have a genotoxic potential in vitro which calls for a more thorough safety evaluation. Such evaluation should include other end-points of genotoxicity apart from DNA damage, and possibly also pure compounds.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: DNA Damage/drug effects
Mutagens/toxicity
Plant Extracts/toxicity
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cell Survival/drug effects
Comet Assay
Fabaceae/chemistry
Hep G2 Cells
Humans
Lamiaceae/chemistry
Mutagenicity Tests
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Mutagens); 0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-017-2056-x


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