Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Laryngeal and Nerve and Injuries [Words]
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[PMID]: 29329350
[Au] Autor:Su YK; Wang JH; Hsieh SY; Liu XZ; Lam CF; Huang SC
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital and Tzu Chi University School of Medicine, Hualien, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Incidence and risk factors for postoperative lingual neuropraxia following airway instrumentation: A retrospective matched case-control study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190589, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lingual nerve injury or neuropraxia is a rare but potentially serious perioperative complication following airway instrumentation during general anesthesia. This study explored the the incidence and perioperative risk factors for lingual nerve injury in patients receiving laryngeal mask (LMA) or endotracheal (ETGA) general anesthesia in a single center experience. METHODS AND RESULTS: All surgical patients in our hospital who received LMA or ETGA from 2009 to 2013 were included, and potential perioperative risk factors were compared. Matched controls were randomly selected (in 1:5 ratio) from the same database in non-case patients. A total of 36 patients in the records had reported experiencing tongue numbness after anesthesia in this study. Compared with the non-case surgical population (n = 54314), patients with tongue numbness were significantly younger (52.2±19.5 vs 42.0±14.5; P = 0.002) and reported lower ASA physical statuses (2.3±0.7 vs 1.6±0.6; P<0.001). Patient gender, anesthesia technique used, and airway device type (LMA or ETGA) did not differ significantly across the two groups. A significantly higher proportion of patients underwent operations of the head-and-neck region (38.9 vs 15.6%; P = 0.002) developed tongue numbness after anesthesia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that head-and-neck operations remained the most significant independent risk factor for postoperative lingual nerve injury (AOR 7.63; 95% CI 2.03-28.70). CONCLUSION: The overall incidence rate of postoperative lingual neuropraxy was 0.066% in patients receiving general anesthesia with airway device in place. Young and generally healthy patients receiving head-and-neck operation are at higher risk in developing postoperative lingual neuropraxy. Attention should be particularly exercised to reduce the pressure of endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask on the tongue during head-and-neck operation to avert the occurrence of postoperative lingual neuropraxy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Laryngeal Masks/adverse effects
Lingual Nerve Injuries/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190589

  2 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29282507
[Au] Autor:Mattsson P; Frostell A; Björck G; Persson JKE; Hakim R; Zedenius J; Svensson M
[Ad] Address:Division of Clinical CNS Research, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet R2:02, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. per.mattsson@ki.se.
[Ti] Title:Recovery of Voice After Reconstruction of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve and Adjuvant Nimodipine.
[So] Source:World J Surg;42(3):632-638, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Transection injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) has been associated with permanent vocal fold palsy, and treatment has been limited to voice therapy or local treatment of vocal folds. Microsurgical repair has been reported to induce a better function. The calcium channel antagonist nimodipine improves functional recovery after experimental nerve injury and also after cranial nerve injury in patients. This study aims to present voice outcome in patients who underwent repair of the RLN and received nimodipine during regeneration. METHODS: From 2002-2016, 19 patients were admitted to our center with complete unilateral injury to the RLN and underwent microsurgical repair of the RLN. After nerve repair, patients received nimodipine for 2-3 months. Laryngoscopy was performed repeatedly up to 14 months postoperatively. The Voice Handicap Index (VHI) was administered, and patients' maximum phonation time (MPT) was recorded during the follow-up. RESULTS: All patients recovered well after surgery, and nimodipine was well tolerated with no dropouts. None of the patients suffered from atrophy of the vocal fold, and some patients even showed a small ab/adduction of the vocal fold on the repaired side with laryngoscopy. During long-term follow-up (>3 years), VHI and MPT normalized, indicating a nearly complete recovery from unilateral RLN injury. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, we report the results of the first 19 consecutive cases at our center subjected to reconstruction of the RLN and adjuvant nimodipine treatment. The outcome of the current strategy is encouraging and should be considered after iatrogenic RLN transection injuries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00268-017-4235-9

  3 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29302725
[Au] Autor:Mercier F; Bonal M; Fanget F; Maillard L; Laplace N; Peix JL; Lifante JC
[Ad] Address:The Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, CHU Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon, 165 Chemin du Grand Revoyet, 69495, Pierre Bénite, France.
[Ti] Title:Does Surgery Without Lugol's Solution Pretreatment for Graves' Disease Increase Surgical Morbidity?
[So] Source:World J Surg;, 2018 Jan 04.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Total thyroidectomy can be performed for Graves' disease after a euthyroid state is achieved using inhibitors of thyroid hormone synthesis (thioamides). However, hypervascularization of the thyroid gland is associated with increased hemorrhage risk, in addition to complicating identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid gland. Saturated iodine solution (Lugol's solution) has been recommended to reduce thyroid gland hypervascularization and intraoperative blood loss, although this approach is not used at our center based on our experience that it induces thyroid firmness and potentially hypoparathyroidism. METHODS: This retrospective single-center study evaluated patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between November 2010 and November 2015. The rates of various complications at our center were compared to those from the literature (e.g., cervical hematoma, hypocalcemia, and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy). RESULTS: Three hundred and eighty consecutive patients underwent total thyroidectomy without preoperative Lugol's solution (311 women [81.84%] and 69 men [18.16%], mean age 43.41 years). No postoperative deaths were reported, although 30 patients (7.89%) experienced recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and 9 patients experienced permanent injuries (2.37%). Hypoparathyroidism was experienced by 87 patients (25.53%) and 14 patients experienced permanent hypoparathyroidism (3.68%). Four patients required reoperation for cervical hematoma (1.05%; 2 deep and 2 superficial hematomas). CONCLUSION: Despite the recommendation of iodine pretreatment, few of our non-pretreated patients experienced permanent nerve injury (2.37%) or permanent hypoparathyroidism (3.68%). These results are comparable to the outcomes from the literature. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether iodine pretreatment is necessary before surgery for Graves' disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00268-017-4443-3

  4 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29187691
[Au] Autor:Fujiwara S; Yoshimura H; Nishiya K; Oshima K; Kawamoto M; Kohara N
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Tapia's syndrome following transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation: a case report].
[So] Source:Rinsho Shinkeigaku;57(12):785-787, 2017 Dec 27.
[Is] ISSN:1882-0654
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 67-year-old man presented with hoarseness, dysarthria and deviation of the tongue to the left side the day after the open-heart operation under general anesthesia. Brain MRI demonstrated no causal lesion, and laryngoscope showed left vocal cord abductor palsy, so we diagnosed him with Tapia's syndrome (i.e., concomitant paralysis of the left recurrent and hypoglossal nerve). His neurological symptoms recovered gradually and improved completely four months after the onset. Tapia's syndrome is a rare condition caused by the extra cranial lesion of the recurrent laryngeal branch of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nerve, and mostly described as a complication of tracheal intubation. In this case, transesophageal echo probe has been held in the left side of the pharynx, so compression to the posterior wall of pharynx by the probe resulted in this condition, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Tapia's syndrome due to transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation. This rare syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis of dysarthria and tongue deviation after a procedure associated with compression to the pharynx.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/adverse effects
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/etiology
Intraoperative Complications/etiology
Vocal Cord Paralysis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Diagnosis, Differential
Dysarthria/etiology
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/instrumentation
Humans
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/diagnosis
Male
Syndrome
Vocal Cord Paralysis/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5692/clinicalneurol.cn-001097

  5 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27771850
[Au] Autor:Ward AF; Lee T; Ogilvie JB; Patel KN; Hiotis K; Bizekis C; Zervos M
[Ad] Address:Division of Thoracic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, 530 First Avenue, Suite 9V, New York, NY, 10016, USA.
[Ti] Title:Robot-assisted complete thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenomas in primary hyperparathyroidism.
[So] Source:J Robot Surg;11(2):163-169, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:One to two percent of ectopic parathyroid adenomas are found in the lower mediastinum and often these are best accessed via a sternotomy or thoracotomy. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is an alternative approach with less surgical trauma, decreased morbidity, shorter hospital stays, and superior cosmetic results. Ten years after the first VATS resection of an ectopic mediastinal parathyroid, a robot-assisted thoracoscopic approach was described. Here we describe a series of five robot assisted complete thymectomies in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenomas. A single surgeon, single institution case series of five consecutive robotic-assisted mediastinal parathyroidectomies was performed between March 2013 and September 2015. The patients' ages ranged from 31 to 65, 80 % were female, and all had primary hyperparathyroidism due to an ectopic parathyroid located in the lower mediastinum. Pre-operative imaging workup included Technetium 99-sestimibi parathyroid scan and CT scan of the chest. An ectopic parathyroid adenoma was successfully removed in all five cases, with intraoperative iOPTH decreasing ~50 % from baseline after 10 minutes. A hypercellular parathyroid was confirmed on pathologic exam in all specimens. Post-operative discharge and follow up calcium levels all returned to normal. There were no intraoperative complications, including no recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, no postoperative morbidity, and no mortalities. This case series demonstrates that a robot-assisted complete thymectomy for mediastinal parathyroid adenomas causing primary hyperparathyroidism provides excellent visualization of the mediastinum, is effective at reducing PTH and calcium levels, and is safe with no morbidity or mortality.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenoma/surgery
Choristoma/surgery
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary/surgery
Mediastinal Diseases/surgery
Parathyroid Neoplasms/surgery
Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods
Thymectomy/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenoma/pathology
Adult
Aged
Choristoma/pathology
Female
Humans
Laparoscopy/methods
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Neoplasms/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11701-016-0637-1

  6 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29142848
[Au] Autor:Potenza AS; Araujo Filho VJF; Cernea CR
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery Service of the Hospital das Clínicas, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery.
[So] Source:Gland Surg;6(5):552-562, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2227-684X
[Cp] Country of publication:China (Republic : 1949- )
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) innervates the cricothyroid muscle (CTM) to promote lengthening and thinning of the vocal fold, thus increasing voice pitch. The close relation with the superior thyroid vessels (STV) puts the EBSLN in risk every time the superior pole of the thyroid is dissected. It travels downward to innervate the CTM, lateral to the thyroid cartilage and to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (IPCM), being eventually covered by this muscle fibers as it approaches its entry point. During its descending course, the EBSLN curves and crosses the STV posteriorly. The lower this crossing occurs in the neck, the higher the risk of surgical damage to the nerve by transection, traction, entrapment, thermal damage or disrupted blood supply. The chances of surgical trauma are also increased by size and weight of the specimen, shorter neck length and non-white ethnicity. Voice changes following thyroid surgery are common and multifactorial. The actual rate of vocal impairment due to EBSLN injury is unclear, since changes to the everyday speaking voice can be minimal and laryngeal findings are usually subtle and controversial. CTM electroneuromyography (EMG) is the most accurate tool to diagnose abnormal EBSLN conductivity, but it is technically difficult and barely applicable in routine practice. Recommended approaches to prevent injury include: (I) individual distal ligature of the STV by the thyroid capsule; (II) visual identification of the nerve and its trajectory and (III) electrostimulation with either observation of CTM twitch or intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) via dedicated endotracheal tube electrodes. There is accumulating evidence that a combination of visual and standardized electrophysiological EBSLN identification with meticulous division of the STV improves preservation rates. IONM bears the additional benefits of prognostication, quantification and documentation of neural function once it allows intraoperative laryngeal EMG.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21037/gs.2017.06.15

  7 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29124354
[Au] Autor:Udelsman R; Citino SB; Prasad M; Donovan PI; Fredholm DV
[Ad] Address:Endocrine Neoplasia Institute, Miami Cancer Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, USA. RobertUd@Baptisthealth.net.
[Ti] Title:Parathyroid, Thyroid and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Anatomy in an Indian Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis).
[So] Source:World J Surg;, 2017 Nov 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The parathyroid gland was first identified in the Indian rhinoceros in 1849 by Sir Richard Owen. We performed a necropsy in an Indian rhinoceros, recapitulating Owen's dissection and display what appear to be the initial identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in situ and the anatomy and histology of the largest rhinoceros parathyroid glands yet identified. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patrick T. Rhino, a 41-year-old Indian rhinoceros was born in 1974. His early years were unremarkable. In 2006, he was donated to White Oak Conservation in Yulee, Florida, where he bred and sustained minor injuries. In his geriatric years, he developed a cataract and degenerative joint disease (DJD). At age 41, he developed progressive ataxia and lameness and was euthanized to minimize suffering when he was unable to stand. ROS, FH, SH and medication history were unremarkable. Physical exam was age and species appropriate. Pre-mortem serum demonstrated: creat 1.8 mg/dL (0.8-2.1), calcium 10.6 mg/dL (9.7-13.1), phos 3.8 mg/dL (2.5-6.7), alk phos 69 U/L (26-158) and intact PTH 44.1 pg/mL (rhinoceros reference range: unknown). Necropsy revealed intervertebral DJD with thoracic spondylosis, which combined with osteoporosis, resulted in thoracic myelopathy and ataxia. The neck block was sent in formalin to the Yale University School of Medicine. RESULTS: Detailed dissection was performed under loupe magnification. Presumed structures were photographed in situ and biopsied. The thyroid was identified deep to the strap muscles, received its blood supply from the inferior and superior thyroid arteries and was blue in color. The right recurrent laryngeal nerve, identified and photographed in situ for the first time in the rhinoceros, was deep to the inferior thyroid artery and was traced throughout its cervical course. Single parathyroid glands identified on the lateral thyroid lobes received their blood supply from the inferior thyroid arteries and were confirmed histologically. They appear to be the largest parathyroids yet identified in the rhinoceros with estimated weights of 6,280 and 11,000 mg, respectively. Although the etiology of the parathyroid gland enlargement is unknown, the specimen has been preserved recapitulating the dissection performed by Sir Richard Owen. CONCLUSION: The parathyroids, thyroid and recurrent laryngeal nerve were identified in an Indian rhinoceros. This appears to be the first display of the rhinoceros recurrent laryngeal nerve in situ, and the parathyroid glands are the largest yet identified in the rhinoceros.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00268-017-4325-8

  8 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29124033
[Au] Autor:Na BS; Choi JH; Park IK; Kim YT; Kang CH
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Intraoperative Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Monitoring in a Patient with Contralateral Vocal Fold Palsy.
[So] Source:Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg;50(5):391-394, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2233-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury can develop following cervical or thoracic surgery; however, few reports have described intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. Consensus regarding the use of this technique during thoracic surgery is lacking. We used intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring in a patient with contralateral vocal cord paralysis who was scheduled for completion pneumonectomy. This case serves as an example of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring during thoracic surgery and supports this indication for its use.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171112
[Lr] Last revision date:171112
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5090/kjtcs.2017.50.5.391

  9 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29110082
[Au] Autor:De la Quintana Basarrate A; Iglesias Martínez A; Salutregui I; Agirre Etxabe L; Arana González A; Yurrebaso Santamaría I
[Ad] Address:Department of General Surgery, Cruces University Hospital, Basque Country University (UPV-EHU), plaza de Cruces s/n, 48903, Barakaldo, Basque Country, Spain. aitor.quintanadelabasarrate@osakidetza.eus.
[Ti] Title:Continuous monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.
[So] Source:Langenbecks Arch Surg;, 2017 Nov 06.
[Is] ISSN:1435-2451
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the safety and utility of continuous intraoperative neuromonitoring for the prevention of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during thyroidectomy. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in consecutive patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Variations in amplitude and distal latency of the electromyogram (EMG) were assessed. In the case of suspicious events, restorative manoeuvers were performed to attempt to recover the potentials. Associations were explored between findings in laryngoscopy 24 h after surgery and intraoperative neurophysiological events. RESULTS: In the study, 248 consecutive thyroidectomies were included, which were carried out between January 2012 and December 2015. Continuous vagal nerve monitoring was not associated with adverse cardiopulmonary events. Among the 400 at-risk recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLNs), there were eight nerves showing temporary palsy (2%). While an increase in distal latency of > 10% did not provide any relevant information, a decrease in the amplitude of the EMG of > 50% was associated with a higher risk of RLN palsy. A decrease in the amplitude of the EMG of > 50% was associated with negative and positive predictive values of 100 and 47%, respectively. Recovery manoeuvers reversed the decline in the amplitude of potentials in 80% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous vagal nerve monitoring is safe and allows us to assess nerve function intraoperatively. A decrease of more than 50% in the amplitude of the potentials from EMG baseline is a warning sign of the development of a nerve injury. Nevertheless, this decrease is reversible with restorative manoeuvers, making it possible to minimise RLN injuries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00423-017-1631-4

  10 / 1853 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29090002
[Au] Autor:Li Y; Xu W; Cheng LY
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Beijing Tong Ren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Otorhinolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells accelerate nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury.
[So] Source:Neural Regen Res;12(9):1544-1550, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1673-5374
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Medialization thyroplasty or injection laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis cannot restore mobility of the vocal fold. Recent studies have shown that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells is effective in the repair of nerve injuries. This study investigated whether adipose-derived stem cell transplantation could repair recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Rat models of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were established by crushing with micro forceps. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs; 8 × 10 ) or differentiated Schwann-like adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dADSCs; 8 × 10 ) or extracellular matrix were injected at the site of injury. At 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-surgery, a higher density of myelinated nerve fiber, thicker myelin sheath, improved vocal fold movement, better recovery of nerve conduction capacity and reduced thyroarytenoid muscle atrophy were found in ADSCs and dADSCs groups compared with the extracellular matrix group. The effects were more pronounced in the ADSCs group than in the dADSCs group. These experimental results indicated that ADSCs transplantation could be an early interventional strategy to promote regeneration after recurrent laryngeal nerve injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/1673-5374.215267


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