Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Laryngitis [Words]
References found : 3347 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 335 go to page                         

  1 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29260786
[Au] Autor:Ryabova MA
[Ad] Address:First Saint-Petersburg State Medical University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 197022.
[Ti] Title:Fenspirid v kompleksnom lechenii obostreniia khronicheskogo laringita. [The use of fenspiride for the combined treatment of exacerbation of chronic laryngitis].
[So] Source:Vestn Otorinolaringol;82(6):66-69, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0042-4668
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The present study was carried out based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of I.P. Pavlov First State Medical University of Saint-Petersburg. The objective of this work was to elucidate the efficacy and safety of fenspiride therapy for the treatment of exacerbation of chronic laryngitis associated with an acute respiratory infection. The patients comprising the main group received fenspiride (Eurespal, 'Servier', France) at the standard dose in addition to the conventional therapy with the use of antibiotics, inhalation, and voice rest. The patients in the group of comparison were treated following the conventional protocol without fenspiride. The clinical symptoms evaluated based on the scoring system, the results of videolaryngoscopy, and computer-assisted analysis of the voice were compared before and after treatment in the patients of both groups. The results of the study have confirmed the high effectiveness and safety of fenspiride therapy of exacerbation of chronic laryngitis.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.17116/otorino201782666-69

  2 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29494321
[Au] Autor:Stachler RJ; Francis DO; Schwartz SR; Damask CC; Digoy GP; Krouse HJ; McCoy SJ; Ouellette DR; Patel RR; Reavis CCW; Smith LJ; Smith M; Strode SW; Woo P; Nnacheta LC
[Ad] Address:1 Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update).
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(1_suppl):S1-S42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on treating patients who present with dysphonia, which is characterized by altered vocal quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication and/or quality of life. Dysphonia affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in its life. This guideline applies to all age groups evaluated in a setting where dysphonia would be identified or managed. It is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and treat patients with dysphonia. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with dysphonia, based on current best evidence. Expert consensus to fill evidence gaps, when used, is explicitly stated and supported with a detailed evidence profile for transparency. Specific objectives of the guideline are to reduce inappropriate variations in care, produce optimal health outcomes, and minimize harm. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of advanced practice nursing, bronchoesophagology, consumer advocacy, family medicine, geriatric medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, neurology, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, professional voice, pulmonology, and speech-language pathology. Action Statements The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination to identify factors where expedited laryngeal evaluation is indicated. These include, but are not limited to, recent surgical procedures involving the head, neck, or chest; recent endotracheal intubation; presence of concomitant neck mass; respiratory distress or stridor; history of tobacco abuse; and whether the patient is a professional voice user. (2) Clinicians should advocate voice therapy for patients with dysphonia from a cause amenable to voice therapy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should identify dysphonia in a patient with altered voice quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication or reduces quality of life (QOL). (2) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination for underlying causes of dysphonia and factors that modify management. (3) Clinicians should perform laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform laryngoscopy, when dysphonia fails to resolve or improve within 4 weeks or irrespective of duration if a serious underlying cause is suspected. (4) Clinicians should perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, before prescribing voice therapy and document/communicate the results to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). (5) Clinicians should advocate for surgery as a therapeutic option for patients with dysphonia with conditions amenable to surgical intervention, such as suspected malignancy, symptomatic benign vocal fold lesions that do not respond to conservative management, or glottic insufficiency. (6) Clinicians should offer, or refer to a clinician who can offer, botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of dysphonia caused by spasmodic dysphonia and other types of laryngeal dystonia. (7) Clinicians should inform patients with dysphonia about control/preventive measures. (8) Clinicians should document resolution, improvement or worsened symptoms of dysphonia, or change in QOL of patients with dysphonia after treatment or observation. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 1 action: (1) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe antibiotics to treat dysphonia. The guideline update group made recommendations against other actions: (1) Clinicians should not obtain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patients with a primary voice complaint prior to visualization of the larynx. (2) Clinicians should not prescribe antireflux medications to treat isolated dysphonia, based on symptoms alone attributed to suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), without visualization of the larynx. (3) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe corticosteroids for patients with dysphonia prior to visualization of the larynx. The policy level for the following recommendation about laryngoscopy at any time was an option: (1) Clinicians may perform diagnostic laryngoscopy at any time in a patient with dysphonia. Disclaimer This clinical practice guideline is not intended as an exhaustive source of guidance for managing dysphonia (hoarseness). Rather, it is designed to assist clinicians by providing an evidence-based framework for decision-making strategies. The guideline is not intended to replace clinical judgment or establish a protocol for all individuals with this condition, and it may not provide the only appropriate approach to diagnosing and managing this problem. Differences from Prior Guideline (1) Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply (2) Inclusion of 3 new guidelines, 16 new systematic reviews, and 4 new randomized controlled trials (3) Inclusion of a consumer advocate on the guideline update group (4) Changes to 9 KASs from the original guideline (5) New KAS 3 (escalation of care) and KAS 13 (outcomes) (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs for patients with dysphonia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751030

  3 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29494316
[Au] Autor:Stachler RJ; Francis DO; Schwartz SR; Damask CC; Digoy GP; Krouse HJ; McCoy SJ; Ouellette DR; Patel RR; Reavis CCW; Smith LJ; Smith M; Strode SW; Woo P; Nnacheta LC
[Ad] Address:1 Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update) Executive Summary.
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(3):409-426, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on treating patients presenting with dysphonia, which is characterized by altered vocal quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication and/or quality of life. Dysphonia affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in its life. This guideline applies to all age groups evaluated in a setting where dysphonia would be identified or managed. It is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and treat patients with dysphonia. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with dysphonia, based on current best evidence. Expert consensus to fill evidence gaps, when used, is explicitly stated and supported with a detailed evidence profile for transparency. Specific objectives of the guideline are to reduce inappropriate variations in care, produce optimal health outcomes, and minimize harm. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of advanced practice nursing, bronchoesophagology, consumer advocacy, family medicine, geriatric medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, neurology, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, professional voice, pulmonology, and speech-language pathology. Action Statements The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination to identify factors where expedited laryngeal evaluation is indicated. These include but are not limited to recent surgical procedures involving the head, neck, or chest; recent endotracheal intubation; presence of concomitant neck mass; respiratory distress or stridor; history of tobacco abuse; and whether the patient is a professional voice user. (2) Clinicians should advocate voice therapy for patients with dysphonia from a cause amenable to voice therapy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should identify dysphonia in a patient with altered voice quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication or reduces quality of life (QOL). (2) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination for underlying causes of dysphonia and factors that modify management. (3) Clinicians should perform laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform laryngoscopy, when dysphonia fails to resolve or improve within 4 weeks or irrespective of duration if a serious underlying cause is suspected. (4) Clinicians should perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, before prescribing voice therapy and document/communicate the results to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). (5) Clinicians should advocate for surgery as a therapeutic option for patients with dysphonia with conditions amenable to surgical intervention, such as suspected malignancy, symptomatic benign vocal fold lesions that do not respond to conservative management, or glottic insufficiency. (6) Clinicians should offer, or refer to a clinician who can offer, botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of dysphonia caused by spasmodic dysphonia and other types of laryngeal dystonia. (7) Clinicians should inform patients with dysphonia about control/preventive measures. (8) Clinicians should document resolution, improvement or worsened symptoms of dysphonia, or change in QOL of patients with dysphonia after treatment or observation. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 1 action: (1) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe antibiotics to treat dysphonia. The guideline update group made recommendations against other actions: (1) Clinicians should not obtain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patients with a primary voice complaint prior to visualization of the larynx. (2) Clinicians should not prescribe antireflux medications to treat isolated dysphonia, based on symptoms alone attributed to suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), without visualization of the larynx. (3) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe corticosteroids in patients with dysphonia prior to visualization of the larynx. The policy level for the following recommendation about laryngoscopy at any time was an option: (1) Clinicians may perform diagnostic laryngoscopy at any time in a patient with dysphonia. Differences from Prior Guideline (1) Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply (2) Inclusion of 3 new guidelines, 16 new systematic reviews, and 4 new randomized controlled trials (3) Inclusion of a consumer advocate on the guideline update group (4) Changes to 9 KASs from the original guideline (5) New KAS 3 (escalation of care) and KAS 13 (outcomes) (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs for patients with dysphonia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751031

  4 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29494315
[Au] Autor:Krouse HJ; Reavis CCW; Stachler RJ; Francis DO; O'Connor S
[Ad] Address:1 University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Title:Plain Language Summary: Hoarseness (Dysphonia).
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(3):427-431, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This plain language summary for patients serves as an overview in explaining hoarseness (dysphonia). The summary applies to patients in all age groups and is based on the 2018 "Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update)." The evidence-based guideline includes research to support more effective identification and management of patients with hoarseness (dysphonia). The primary purpose of the guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with hoarseness (dysphonia) based on current best evidence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751137

  5 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29493467
[Au] Autor:Rahman A; Rahman M; Demirtas I
[Ad] Address:Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Islamic University, Kushtia 7003, Bangladesh Kushtia. Bangladesh.
[Ti] Title:Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Potential of Essential Oil and Organic Extracts of Euphorbia tithymaloides L. from Kushtia Region.
[So] Source:Anticancer Agents Med Chem;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1875-5992
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In traditional system of medicine, leaves and stem bark of Euphorbia tithymaloides L. have been used for the treatment of asthma, persistent coughing, laryngitis, skin diseases and mouth ulcers. Some studies have reported the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of phytochemicals from leaf; however, the analysis of essential oil and its antioxidant property is still unexplored. This study evaluates the in vitro antioxidant potential of the essential oil and organic extracts from aerial parts of Euphorbia tithymaloides L. Thirty one compounds representing 96.37% of total oil were detected by GC-MS, of which eugenol (22.52%), phenyl ethyl alcohol (14.63%), 3-pentanol (9.22%), caryophyllene oxide (7.73%), isoeugenol (7.32%), pentadecanol (5.14%), spathulenol (5.11%) and α-pinene (3.32%) were the major compounds. The oil and ethyl acetate extract displayed potent DPPH (IC50 = 13.67 and 17.59 µg/mL, respectively) and superoxide (IC50 = 21.83 and 42.34 µg/mL, respectively) radical-scavenging activities among all the tested samples. The oil and methanol extract also exhibited remarkable nitric oxide radical-scavenging activities (IC50 = 90.45 and 112.63 µg/mL, respectively) among other extracts. Furthermore, the methanol extract contained the highest amount of total phenolics as compared to other samples. The results demonstrate that the oil and extracts of E. tithymaloides could serve as natural antioxidants for using in pharmaceutical or cosmetic industries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1871520618666180228122318

  6 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29488499
[Au] Autor:Kryukov AI; Romanenko SG; Pavlikhin OG; Lesogorova EV
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, N.I. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia, 117997; L.I. Sverzhevskiy Research Institute of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology, Moscow Health Department, Moscow, Russia, 117152.
[Ti] Title:Kliniko-funktsional'noe sostoianie gortani u patsientov starshei vozrastnoi gruppy s khronicheskim otechno-polipoznym laringitom. [The clinical and functional condition of the larynx in the patients of the elder age group presenting with chronic oedematous polypoidal laryngitis].
[So] Source:Vestn Otorinolaringol;83(1):56-58, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0042-4668
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:This article was designed to report the results of the evaluation of the clinical and functional condition of the larynx in the patients of the elder age group presenting with chronic oedematous polypoidal laryngitis before and after their surgical treatment. A total of 60 patients at the age from 60 to 72 years were available for the examination; all of them had a concomitant somatic or ENT pathology. The clinical and functional conditions of the larynx in the patients of the elder age group were studied, with special reference to those suffering from chronic oedematous polypoidal laryngitis before the surgical intervention, that determined the overall clinical picture of the disease characterized in the first place by the predominance of the severe polypoid process with the combination of the organic and functional laryngeal pathology. The specific clinical and functional features of the larynx were identified after the surgical treatment that exerted the appreciable influence on the postoperative course of the disease and the duration of dysphonia. The peculiarities of postoperative laryngitis are described. Its catarrhal form was diagnosed in 42% of the patients. The strong inflammatory reaction with exudation and formation of fibrin films was documented in 58% of the patients while 83% of them exhibited formation of the functional component of dysphonia that required the application of the additional therapeutic measures for the complete restoration of the vocal function taking into consideration the age-related alteration of the larynx together with the long-term postoperative observation of the patients.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17116/otorino201883156-58

  7 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29324903
[Au] Autor:Ban MJ; Kim WS; Park KN; Kim JW; Lee SW; Han K; Chang JW; Byeon HK; Koh YW; Park JH
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Korean survey data reveals an association of chronic laryngitis with tinnitus in men.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191148, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The association between chronic laryngitis and tinnitus is not a well-studied topic, unlike the association of these two conditions with many other disorders. Cross-sectional data of 11,347 adults (males: 4,934; females: 6,413), who completed the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2010 to 2012 were used to investigate this association. Lifestyle patterns, including smoking and alcohol habits, regular exercise, physical and mental health status, socioeconomic status, nutritional status, and other chronic diseases, were analyzed. Chronic laryngitis and tinnitus were diagnosed by field survey teams, which included otolaryngologists, who conducted chronic disease surveillance using a health status interview, a nutritional status questionnaire, and a physical examination. Chronic laryngitis was significantly associated with age, education beyond high school, depressed mood, voice change, metabolic syndrome, and tinnitus in men. In women, chronic laryngitis was associated with body mass index and diabetes mellitus. Chronic laryngitis in men was significantly associated with tinnitus (odds ratio 1.671, [95% confidence interval: 1.167-2.393]) after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, metabolic syndrome, education beyond high school, and depressed mood. Additionally, the prevalence of chronic laryngitis increased with increasing severity of tinnitus in men alone (P = 0.002). The study revealed a significant association between chronic laryngitis and tinnitus.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Laryngitis/complications
Tinnitus/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Republic of Korea
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191148

  8 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29365382
[Au] Autor:Chen QP; Zhou RF; Zhang YM; Yang L
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Taizhou People's Hospital, Taizhou 225300, China.
[Ti] Title:[Efficacy of systemic glucocorticoids combined with inhaled steroid on children with acute laryngitis].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi;53(1):53-56, 2018 Jan 07.
[Is] ISSN:1673-0860
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To evaluate the efficacy of systemic glucocorticoid (steroid) combined with high dose inhaled steroid in the treatment of children with acute laryngitis. A total of 78 children with acute laryngitis were randomly divided into study group( =40) and control group( =38) between November 2016 and April 2017. In addition to routine treatment of anti infection and symptomatic treatment, Dexamethasone injection(0.3-0.5 mg/kg, 1-3 d, according to the patient's condition) was provided to each group. In addition to the treatment mentioned above, the study group were assigned to receive 1.0 mg Budesonide suspension for inhalation, oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation, every/30 minutes, 2 times in a row, after that every 12 hours. The improvement of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough and wheezing of both groups was evaluated at 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 72 h after treatment.Sigmaplot 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. No significant difference was detected in terms of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough or stridor score before treatment between the two groups( >0.05). Compared with those before treatment, symptoms of inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough and stridor score of both groups improved markedly at 12 h and 24 h after treatment( <0.05). While there was no significant difference regarding inspiratory dyspnea, hoarseness, barking cough or stridor score at each time point after treatment between the two groups( >0.05). The effective rate was 92.50% and 92.11% in study group and control group, respectively, and no significant difference was noted ( >0.05). Compared with single systemic glucocorticoid, systemic glucocorticoids combined with inhaled steroid possessed similar efficacy in treating acute laryngitis and relieving laryngeal obstruction of children.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Budesonide/therapeutic use
Dexamethasone/therapeutic use
Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use
Laryngitis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Administration, Inhalation
Budesonide/administration & dosage
Child
Cough/drug therapy
Dexamethasone/administration & dosage
Drug Administration Schedule
Dyspnea/drug therapy
Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage
Hoarseness/drug therapy
Humans
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Respiratory Sounds/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glucocorticoids); 51333-22-3 (Budesonide); 7S5I7G3JQL (Dexamethasone)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.1673-0860.2018.01.012

  9 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29427733
[Au] Autor:Vaezi MF; Katzka D; Zerbib F
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. Electronic address: Michael.vaezi@vanderbilt.edu.
[Ti] Title:EXTRAESOPHAGEAL SYMPTOMS AND DISEASES ATTRIBUTED TO GERD: Where is the pendulum swinging now?
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The purpose of this review is to outline the recent developments in the field of extraesophageal reflux disease and provide clinically relevant recommendations. METHODS: The recommendations outlined in this review are based on expert opinion and on relevant publications from PubMed and EMbase. The Clinical Practice Updates Committee of the American Gastroenterological Association proposes the following recommendations: 1. The role of a gastroenterologist in patients referred for evaluation of suspected extra esophageal symptom is to assess for gastroesophageal etiologies that could contribute to the presenting symptoms. 2. Non-GI evaluations by ENT, pulmonary and/or allergy are essential and often should be performed initially in most patients as the cause of the extraesophageal symptom is commonly multifactorial or not esophageal in origin.. 3. Empiric therapy with aggressive acid suppression for 6-8 weeks with special focus on response of the extraesophageal symptoms can help in assessing association between reflux and extraesophageal symptoms 4. No single testing methodology exists to definitively identify reflux as the etiology for the suspected extra esophageal symptoms. 5. Constellation of patient presentation, diagnostic test results and response to therapy should be employed in the determination of reflux as a possible etiology in extra esophageal symptoms. 6. Testing may need to be off or on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy depending on patients' presenting demographics and symptoms in assessing the likelihood of abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. A. On therapy testing may be considered in those with high probability of baseline reflux (those with previous esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus or abnormal pH). B. Off therapy testing may be considered in those with low probability of baseline reflux with the goal of identifying moderate to severe reflux at baseline. 7. Lack of response to aggressive acid suppressive therapy combined with normal pH testing off therapy or impedance-pH testing on therapy significantly reduces the likelihood that reflux is a contributing etiology in presenting extraesophageal symptoms. 8. Surgical fundoplication is discouraged in those with extra esophageal reflux symptoms unresponsive to aggressive PPI therapy. 9. Fundoplication should only be considered in those with a mechanical defect (e.g., hiatal hernia), moderate to severe reflux at baseline off PPI therapy who have continued reflux despite PPI therapy and have failed more conservative non-GI treatments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180210
[Lr] Last revision date:180210
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3347 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29385299
[Au] Autor:Valls-Mateus M; Nogués-Sabaté A; Blanch JL; Bernal-Sprekelsen M; Avilés-Jurado FX; Vilaseca I
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Narrow band imaging for head and neck malignancies: Lessons learned from mistakes.
[So] Source:Head Neck;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0347
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The accuracy of white light endoscopy in combination with narrow band imaging (WLE + NBI) for diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) does not reach 100%. We evaluated the characteristics of the false-negative and false-positive cases. METHODS: Five hundred thirty lesions of the upper airways were evaluated. The WLE was followed by NBI examination before performing a biopsy. RESULTS: The false-negative lesions (7.36%) were represented by submucosal and non-SCC tumors. Among the 25 non-SCC tumors, 72% did not show any suspicious vascular pattern under NBI. The false-positive lesions (6.04%) were mainly represented by postradiotherapy mucosal changes, ulcers, and infections. Regarding papillomas, NBI accuracy reached 95.32%, although cases with dysplasia were difficult to distinguish from SCC. CONCLUSION: The WLE + NBI improved diagnostic accuracy, but not all lesions were ideally evaluated with current defined patterns. An accurate anamnesis is mandatory, because, in some cases, it may be more relevant than the NBI pattern.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/hed.25088


page 1 of 335 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information