Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Laurus [Words]
References found : 221 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 23 go to page                         

  1 / 221 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29476857
[Au] Autor:Naeem A; Abbas T; Ali TM; Hasnain A
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, University of Karachi, 75270 Karachi, Pakistan. Electronic address: ayeza.naeem@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Effect of guar gum coatings containing essential oils on shelf life and nutritional quality of green-unripe mangoes during low temperature storage.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;113:403-410, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study investigated the effect of treatment of guar gum coating coupled with essential oils. Harvested unripe green mangoes (UGM) were preserved using edible coatings containing essential oils of Nigella sativa, Coriandrum sativum, Foeniculum vulgare and Laurus nobilis derived using two different solvents (methanol and ethanol) and stored at refrigeration temperature (10°C, 80-85% relative humidity). Physiological and biochemical parameters that assess the quality of fruits were determined. Microbiological analysis was also performed at the start and end of shelf life. Generally, it was observed that ethanolic essential oils supplemented coatings conferred a greater retention of fruit quality as compared to both controls. Bacterial counts were significantly reduced in fruits that were coated with ethanolic essential oil edible coatings. Secondly, the coatings supplemented with ethanolic and methanolic essential oils extended shelf life up to 24days whereas treated and untreated control decayed after 10 and 6days respectively (P<0.05). These results suggested the application of these edible coatings for preservation of unripe green mangoes during cold storage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29277899
[Au] Autor:Osmakov DI; Koshelev SG; Andreev YA; Dubinnyi MA; Kublitski VS; Efremov RG; Sobolevsky AI; Kozlov SA
[Ad] Address:Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Proton-independent activation of acid-sensing ion channel 3 by an alkaloid, lindoldhamine, from Laurus nobilis.
[So] Source:Br J Pharmacol;175(6):924-937, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5381
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) play an important role in synaptic plasticity and learning, as well as in nociception and mechanosensation. ASICs are involved in pain and in neurological and psychiatric diseases, but their therapeutic potential is limited by the lack of ligands activating them at physiological pH. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: We extracted, purified and determined the structure of a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, lindoldhamine, (LIN) from laurel leaves. Its effect on ASIC3 channels were characterized, using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiological recordings from Xenopus laevis oocytes. KEY RESULTS: At pH 7.4 or higher, LIN activated a sustained, proton-independent, current through rat and human ASIC3 channels, but not rat ASIC1a or ASIC2a channels. LIN also potentiated proton-induced transient currents and promoted recovery from desensitization in human, but not rat, ASIC3 channels. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: We describe a novel ASIC subtype-specific agonist LIN, which induced proton-independent activation of human and rat ASIC3 channels at physiological pH. LIN also acts as a positive allosteric modulator of human, but not rat, ASIC3 channels. This unique, species-selective, ligand of ASIC3, opens new avenues in studies of ASIC structure and function, as well as providing new approaches to drug design.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/bph.14134

  3 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29073538
[Au] Autor:Trifilò P; Casolo V; Raimondo F; Petrussa E; Boscutti F; Lo Gullo MA; Nardini A
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Biologiche, Farmaceutiche ed Ambientali, Università di Messina, salita F. Stagno D'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina, Italy. Electronic address: ptrifilo@unime.it.
[Ti] Title:Effects of prolonged drought on stem non-structural carbohydrates content and post-drought hydraulic recovery in Laurus nobilis L.: The possible link between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;120:232-241, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Drought-induced tree decline is a complex event, and recent hypotheses suggest that hydraulic failure and carbon starvation are co-responsible for this process. We tested the possible role of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) content on post-drought hydraulic recovery, to verify the hypothesis that embolism reversal represents a mechanistic link between carbon starvation and stem hydraulics. Measurements were performed in laurel plants subjected to similar water stress levels either over short or long term, to induce comparable embolism levels. Plants subjected to mild and prolonged water shortage (S) showed reduced growth, adjustment of turgor loss point driven by changes in both osmotic potential at full turgor and bulk modulus of elasticity, a lower content of soluble NSC and a higher content of starch with respect to control (C) plants. Moreover, S plants showed a lower ability to recover from xylem embolism than C plants, even after irrigation. Our data suggest that plant carbon status might indirectly influence plant performance during and after drought via effects on xylem hydraulic functioning, supporting the view of a possible mechanistic link between the two processes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29042460
[Au] Autor:Knipfer T; Cuneo I; Earles JM; Reyes C; Brodersen C; McElrone AJ
[Ad] Address:University of Davis California CITY: Davis STATE: California POSTAL_CODE: 95616 United States Of America [US] tmknipfer@ucdavis.edu.
[Ti] Title:Storage compartments for capillary water rarely refill in an intact woody plant.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol;, 2017 Oct 17.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Water storage is thought to play an integral role in the maintenance of whole plant water balance. The contribution of both living and dead cells to water storage can be derived from rehydration and pressure-volume curves on excised plant material, but the underlying tissue-specific emptying/refilling dynamics remain unclear. Here, we used X-ray computed micro-tomography (microCT) to characterize refilling of xylem fibers, pith cells and vessels under both excised and in-vivo conditions in Laurus nobilis. In excised stems supplied with H2O, water uptake exhibited a biphasic response curve, and microCT images showed that high water storage capacitance was associated with fiber and pith refilling as driven by capillary forces; fibers refilled more rapidly than pith cells while vessel refilling was minimal. In excised stems that were sealed, fiber and pith refilling was associated with vessel emptying, indicating a link between tissue connectivity and water storage. In contrast, refilling of fibers, pith cells and vessels was negligible in intact saplings over two timescales, a period of 24-h and 3-weeks. However, those compartments did refill slowly when the shoot was covered to prevent transpiration. Collectively, our data i) provide direct evidence that storage compartments for capillary water refill in excised stems but rarely under in-vivo conditions, ii) highlight that estimates of capacitance from excised samples should be interpreted with caution as certain storage compartments may not be utilized in the intact plant, and iii) question the paradigm that fibers play a substantial role in daily discharge/recharge of stem capacitance in an intact tree.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28605974
[Au] Autor:Takács I; Takács Á; Pósa A; Gyémánt G
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Szeged , Szeged , Hungary.
[Ti] Title:HPLC method for measurement of human salivary α-amylase inhibition by aqueous plant extracts.
[So] Source:Acta Biol Hung;68(2):127-136, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0236-5383
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Control of hyperglycemia is an important treatment in metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes and obesity. α-Amylase, as the first enzyme of glucose release from dietary polysaccharides, is a potential target to identify new sources of novel anti-obesity and anti-diabetic drugs. In this work, different herbal extracts as α-amylase inhibitors were studied by measuring the rate of the cleavage of a maltooligomer substrate 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-ß-D-maltoheptoside. Measurement of chromophore containing products after reversed phase HPLC separation was used for α-amylase activity measurement. Rates of hydrolysis catalysed by human salivary α-amylase were determined in the presence and absence of lyophilised water extracts of eleven herbs. Remarkable bioactivities were found for extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (bark), Camellia sinensis L. (leaf), Ribes nigrum L. (leaf), Laurus nobilis L. (leaf), Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton (fruit) and Syzygium aromaticum L. (bud). Determined IC values were in 0.017-41 µg/ml range for these six selected plant extracts. Our results confirm the applicability of this HPLC-based method for the quick and reliable comparison of plants as α-amylase inhibitors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Salivary Proteins and Peptides/antagonists & inhibitors
alpha-Amylases/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Enzyme Inhibitors/isolation & purification
Humans
Salivary Proteins and Peptides/chemistry
alpha-Amylases/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Salivary Proteins and Peptides); EC 3.2.1.1 (alpha-Amylases)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170814
[Lr] Last revision date:170814
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170614
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/018.68.2017.2.1

  6 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28587201
[Au] Autor:Caputo L; Nazzaro F; Souza LF; Aliberti L; De Martino L; Fratianni F; Coppola R; De Feo V
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Salerno), Italy. lcaputo@unisa.it.
[Ti] Title:Laurus nobilis: Composition of Essential Oil and Its Biological Activities.
[So] Source:Molecules;22(6), 2017 Jun 03.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:is native to the southern Mediterranean region and cultivated mainly in Europe and the USA as an ornamental and medicinal plant. The chemical composition of the essential oil (EO) from leaves of collected in Southern Italy, was studied by GC and GC-MS. In all, 55 compounds were identified, accounting for 91.6% of the total oil. 1,8-Cineole (31.9%), sabinene (12.2%), and linalool (10.2%) were the main components. Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of EO and 1,8-cineole were determined in vitro. The cytotoxicity of the EO was evaluated against SH-SY5Y cell line, as well as the influence of the EO on the expression of adenylate cyclase 1 (ADCY1), suggesting possible oil effects on the Central Nervous System.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170607
[Lr] Last revision date:170607
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28087368
[Au] Autor:Menendez-Baceta G; Pardo-de-Santayana M; Aceituno-Mata L; Tardío J; Reyes-García V
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Darwin 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Trends in wild food plants uses in Gorbeialdea (Basque Country).
[So] Source:Appetite;112:9-16, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite wild food plants' potential nutritional and economic value, their knowledge and consumption is quickly decreasing throughout the world. We examine how the consideration that a wild plant use is within the cultural tradition of a given area relates to its consumption by analysing 1) current perception and 2) past and present use of six wild plants' food-uses, of which only three are locally perceived as being part of the local tradition. Research was conducted in Gorbeialdea, an area in the Basque Country with a clearly marked Basque identity opposed to the Spanish identity. Overall, there is a clear decrease in the knowledge and consumption of the selected uses and especially of the three uses acquired from local sources (i.e., the consumption of the raw leaves of Fagus sylvatica and Rumex acetosa and of the fruits of Pyrus cordata). The trend is likely driven by the disappearance of the traditional agrarian lifestyle. Among the uses not acquired from local sources, the use recently adopted from another Basque-speaking area (i.e., macerating the fruits of Prunus spinosa to elaborate a liqueur) is now considered part of the local tradition by young generations, whereas the use acquired from southern Spanish migrants (i.e., using Laurus nobilis leaves as condiments) is not. While lifestyle changes largely explain overall trends in wild edibles consumption, other cultural aspects -in our case study the stigmatization of a given source of information associated to cultural identity- might help shape which new uses of wild plants become embedded in local traditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170309
[Lr] Last revision date:170309
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 27982689
[Au] Autor:Casamassima D; Chiosi F; Vizzarri F; Palazzo M; Costagliola C
[Ad] Address:Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. francesco.vizzarri@unimol.it.
[Ti] Title:The effect of Laurus nobilis on the blood and lenses antioxidant activity in rabbit under fat-enriched diet.
[So] Source:Physiol Res;66(2):325-333, 2017 May 04.
[Is] ISSN:1802-9973
[Cp] Country of publication:Czech Republic
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fat-enriched diet is strongly associated with cataract development. Laurus nobilis shows antioxidant activity. Herein we evaluated the effect of Laurus nobilis oral administration on the blood and lenses antioxidant activity in rabbits under fat-enriched diet. Sixty rabbits divided into 4 groups were used. One group represented the control (N-CTR). The second group (P-CTR) fed a diet supplemented with 2.5 % of pig fat; the third group (EXP1) received a diet supplemented with 2.5 % of pig fat and 1 g/kg of dried-bay leaves; the fourth group (EXP2) was treated with dried-bay leaves at the rate of 1 g/kg of feed. At baseline and at the end of the study (56 days) the following blood parameters were determined: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), total phenols, superoxide dismutase (SOD), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC(pca)), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), retinol and alfa-tocopherol. At the end of the follow-up, the eyes were enucleated and the antioxidant profile, such as total antioxidant activity (TAC), TBARS, retinol and alfa-tocopherol of lenses was evaluated. Plasma ROMs and TBARS levels were statistically lower in the groups receiving bay leaves integration. A significant increase of plasma retinol, FRAP and ORAC(pca) levels was found in EXP1 and EXP2 groups, whereas plasma alfa-tocopherol resulted statistically higher only in EXP2 group. Bay leaves supplementation enhanced TAC, retinol and alfa-tocopherol in rabbit lens, particularly in EXP2 group; whereas lenses TBARS levels significantly decreased in both treated groups. These findings demonstrate that Laurus nobilis oral administration exerts a protective effect on the risk of cataract development in rabbits under fat-enriched diet.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 170504
[Lr] Last revision date:170504
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27956075
[Au] Autor:Mazzio EA; Bauer D; Mendonca P; Taka E; Soliman KF
[Ad] Address:College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, United States.
[Ti] Title:Natural product HTP screening for attenuation of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemo attractants (CINCs) and NO2- in LPS/IFNγ activated glioma cells.
[So] Source:J Neuroimmunol;302:10-19, 2017 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8421
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic and acute central nervous system (CNS) inflammation are contributors toward neurological injury associated with head trauma, stroke, infection, Parkinsons or Alzheimers disease. CNS inflammatory illnesses can also contribute toward risk of developing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). With growing public interest in complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), we conduct a high throughput (HTP) screening of >1400 natural herbs, plants and over the counter (OTC) products for anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon gamma (IFNγ) activated C6 glioma cells. Validation studies were performed showing a pro-inflammatory profile of [LPS 3 µg/ml/ IFNγ 3 ng/ml] consistent with greater release [>8.5 fold] of MCP-1, NO2-, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemo-attractants (CINC) 1, CINC 2a and CINC3. The data show no changes to the following, IL-13, TNF-a, fracktaline, leptin, LIX, GM-CSF, ICAM1, L-Selectin, activin A, agrin, IL-1α, MIP-3a, B72/CD86, NGF, IL-1b, MMP-8, IL-1 R6, PDGF-AA, IL-2, IL-4, prolactin R, RAGE, IL-6, Thymus Chemokine-1, CNTF,IL-10 or TIMP-1. A HTP screening was conducted, where we employ an in vitro efficacy index (iEI) defined as the ratio of toxicity (LC )/anti-inflammatory potency (IC ). The iEI was precautionary to ensure biological effects were occurring in fully viable cells (ratio > 3.8) independent of toxicity. Using NO2- as a guideline molecule, the data show that 1.77% (25 of 1410 tested) had anti-inflammatory effects with iEI ratios >3.8 and IC s <250µg/ml. These include reference drugs (hydrocortisone, dexamethasone N6-(1-iminoethyl)-l-lysine and NSAIDS: diclofenac, tolfenamic acid), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) and the following natural products; Ashwaganda (Withania somnifera), Elecampagne Root (Inula helenium), Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), Green Tea (Camellia sinensis), Turmeric Root (Curcuma longa) Ganthoda (Valeriana wallichii), Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), Maddar Root (Rubia tinctoria), Red Sandle wood (Pterocarpus santalinus), Bay Leaf (Laurus nobilis, Lauraceae), quercetin, cardamonin, fisetin, EGCG, biochanin A, galangin, apigenin and curcumin. The herb with the largest iEI was Ashwaganda where the IC /LC was 11.1/>1750.0µg/ml, and the compound with the greatest iEI was quercetin where the IC /LC was 10.0/>363.6µg/ml. These substances also downregulate the production of iNOS expression and attenuate CINC-3 release. In summary, this HTP screening provides guideline information about the efficacy of natural products that could prevent inflammatory processes associated with neurodegenerative disease and aggressive glioma tumor growth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biological Products/pharmacology
Chemokine CXCL2/metabolism
Cytokines/metabolism
Glioma/metabolism
High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods
Nitrogen Dioxide/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biological Products/therapeutic use
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Survival/drug effects
Cell Survival/physiology
Chemokine CXCL2/antagonists & inhibitors
Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Glioma/drug therapy
Interferon-gamma/toxicity
Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity
Neutrophils
Nitrogen Dioxide/antagonists & inhibitors
Rats
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biological Products); 0 (Chemokine CXCL2); 0 (Cxcl2 protein, rat); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Lipopolysaccharides); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma); S7G510RUBH (Nitrogen Dioxide)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170814
[Lr] Last revision date:170814
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161214
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 221 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27735069
[Au] Autor:Nardini A; Savi T; Losso A; Petit G; Pacilè S; Tromba G; Mayr S; Trifilò P; Lo Gullo MA; Salleo S
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, 34127, Trieste, Italy.
[Ti] Title:X-ray microtomography observations of xylem embolism in stems of Laurus nobilis are consistent with hydraulic measurements of percentage loss of conductance.
[So] Source:New Phytol;213(3):1068-1075, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Drought-induced xylem embolism is a serious threat to plant survival under future climate scenarios. Hence, accurate quantification of species-specific vulnerability to xylem embolism is a key to predict the impact of climate change on vegetation. Low-cost hydraulic measurements of embolism rate have been suggested to be prone to artefacts, thus requiring validation by direct visualization of the functional status of xylem conduits using nondestructive imaging techniques, such as X-ray microtomography (microCT). We measured the percentage loss of conductance (PLC) of excised stems of Laurus nobilis (laurel) dehydrated to different xylem pressures, and compared results with direct observation of gas-filled vs water-filled conduits at a synchrotron-based microCT facility using a phase contrast imaging modality. Theoretical PLC calculated on the basis of microCT observations in stems of laurel dehydrated to different xylem pressures overall were in agreement with hydraulic measurements, revealing that this species suffers a 50% loss of xylem hydraulic conductance at xylem pressures averaging -3.5 MPa. Our data support the validity of estimates of xylem vulnerability to embolism based on classical hydraulic techniques. We discuss possible causes of discrepancies between data gathered in this study and those of recent independent reports on laurel hydraulics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 170112
[Lr] Last revision date:170112
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.14245


page 1 of 23 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information