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[PMID]: 29073538
[Au] Autor:Trifilò P; Casolo V; Raimondo F; Petrussa E; Boscutti F; Lo Gullo MA; Nardini A
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Biologiche, Farmaceutiche ed Ambientali, Università di Messina, salita F. Stagno D'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina, Italy. Electronic address: ptrifilo@unime.it.
[Ti] Title:Effects of prolonged drought on stem non-structural carbohydrates content and post-drought hydraulic recovery in Laurus nobilis L.: The possible link between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;120:232-241, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Drought-induced tree decline is a complex event, and recent hypotheses suggest that hydraulic failure and carbon starvation are co-responsible for this process. We tested the possible role of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) content on post-drought hydraulic recovery, to verify the hypothesis that embolism reversal represents a mechanistic link between carbon starvation and stem hydraulics. Measurements were performed in laurel plants subjected to similar water stress levels either over short or long term, to induce comparable embolism levels. Plants subjected to mild and prolonged water shortage (S) showed reduced growth, adjustment of turgor loss point driven by changes in both osmotic potential at full turgor and bulk modulus of elasticity, a lower content of soluble NSC and a higher content of starch with respect to control (C) plants. Moreover, S plants showed a lower ability to recover from xylem embolism than C plants, even after irrigation. Our data suggest that plant carbon status might indirectly influence plant performance during and after drought via effects on xylem hydraulic functioning, supporting the view of a possible mechanistic link between the two processes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29042460
[Au] Autor:Knipfer T; Cuneo I; Earles JM; Reyes C; Brodersen C; McElrone AJ
[Ad] Address:University of Davis California CITY: Davis STATE: California POSTAL_CODE: 95616 United States Of America [US] tmknipfer@ucdavis.edu.
[Ti] Title:Storage compartments for capillary water rarely refill in an intact woody plant.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol;, 2017 Oct 17.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Water storage is thought to play an integral role in the maintenance of whole plant water balance. The contribution of both living and dead cells to water storage can be derived from rehydration and pressure-volume curves on excised plant material, but the underlying tissue-specific emptying/refilling dynamics remain unclear. Here, we used X-ray computed micro-tomography (microCT) to characterize refilling of xylem fibers, pith cells and vessels under both excised and in-vivo conditions in Laurus nobilis. In excised stems supplied with H2O, water uptake exhibited a biphasic response curve, and microCT images showed that high water storage capacitance was associated with fiber and pith refilling as driven by capillary forces; fibers refilled more rapidly than pith cells while vessel refilling was minimal. In excised stems that were sealed, fiber and pith refilling was associated with vessel emptying, indicating a link between tissue connectivity and water storage. In contrast, refilling of fibers, pith cells and vessels was negligible in intact saplings over two timescales, a period of 24-h and 3-weeks. However, those compartments did refill slowly when the shoot was covered to prevent transpiration. Collectively, our data i) provide direct evidence that storage compartments for capillary water refill in excised stems but rarely under in-vivo conditions, ii) highlight that estimates of capacitance from excised samples should be interpreted with caution as certain storage compartments may not be utilized in the intact plant, and iii) question the paradigm that fibers play a substantial role in daily discharge/recharge of stem capacitance in an intact tree.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28605974
[Au] Autor:Takács I; Takács Á; Pósa A; Gyémánt G
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Szeged , Szeged , Hungary.
[Ti] Title:HPLC method for measurement of human salivary α-amylase inhibition by aqueous plant extracts.
[So] Source:Acta Biol Hung;68(2):127-136, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0236-5383
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Control of hyperglycemia is an important treatment in metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes and obesity. α-Amylase, as the first enzyme of glucose release from dietary polysaccharides, is a potential target to identify new sources of novel anti-obesity and anti-diabetic drugs. In this work, different herbal extracts as α-amylase inhibitors were studied by measuring the rate of the cleavage of a maltooligomer substrate 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-ß-D-maltoheptoside. Measurement of chromophore containing products after reversed phase HPLC separation was used for α-amylase activity measurement. Rates of hydrolysis catalysed by human salivary α-amylase were determined in the presence and absence of lyophilised water extracts of eleven herbs. Remarkable bioactivities were found for extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (bark), Camellia sinensis L. (leaf), Ribes nigrum L. (leaf), Laurus nobilis L. (leaf), Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton (fruit) and Syzygium aromaticum L. (bud). Determined IC values were in 0.017-41 µg/ml range for these six selected plant extracts. Our results confirm the applicability of this HPLC-based method for the quick and reliable comparison of plants as α-amylase inhibitors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Salivary Proteins and Peptides/antagonists & inhibitors
alpha-Amylases/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Enzyme Inhibitors/isolation & purification
Humans
Salivary Proteins and Peptides/chemistry
alpha-Amylases/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Salivary Proteins and Peptides); EC 3.2.1.1 (alpha-Amylases)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170814
[Lr] Last revision date:170814
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170613
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/018.68.2017.2.1

  4 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28487896
[Au] Autor:Al-Haidari RA; Shaaban MI; Ibrahim SRM; Mohamed GA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawwarah 30078, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:ANTI-QUORUM SENSING ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS.
[So] Source:Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med;13(5):67-71, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2505-0044
[Cp] Country of publication:Nigeria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Quorum sensing is the key regulator of virulence factors of such as biofilm formation, motility, productions of proteases, hemolysin, pyocyanin, and toxins. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the extracts from some medicinal plants on quorum sensing and related virulence factors of . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Quorum sensing inhibitory (OSI) effect of the alcohol extracts of 20 medicinal plants was evaluated by reporter using agar cup diffusion method. The efficient QSI extracts were tested for their activity against biofilm synthesis, motility, and synthesis of pyocyanin from PA14. RESULTS: The extracts of , and exhibited potent quorum quenching effect. On the other hand, and extracts showed lower QSI activity. These extracts exhibited significant elimination of pyocyanin formation and biofilm development of PA14. In addition, they significantly inhibited twitching and swimming motilities of PA14. CONCLUSION: This study illustrated, for the first time, the importance of , and as quorum sensing inhibitors and virulence suppressors of . Thus, these plants could provide a natural source for the elimination of pathogenesis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiosperms/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects
Quorum Sensing/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Camellia sinensis/chemistry
Chromobacterium/pathogenicity
Coriandrum/chemistry
Elettaria/chemistry
Laurus/chemistry
Onions/chemistry
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pathogenicity
Virulence Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Virulence Factors)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170812
[Lr] Last revision date:170812
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170510
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21010/ajtcam.v13i5.10

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[PMID]: 28587201
[Au] Autor:Caputo L; Nazzaro F; Souza LF; Aliberti L; De Martino L; Fratianni F; Coppola R; De Feo V
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Salerno), Italy. lcaputo@unisa.it.
[Ti] Title:Laurus nobilis: Composition of Essential Oil and Its Biological Activities.
[So] Source:Molecules;22(6), 2017 Jun 03.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:is native to the southern Mediterranean region and cultivated mainly in Europe and the USA as an ornamental and medicinal plant. The chemical composition of the essential oil (EO) from leaves of collected in Southern Italy, was studied by GC and GC-MS. In all, 55 compounds were identified, accounting for 91.6% of the total oil. 1,8-Cineole (31.9%), sabinene (12.2%), and linalool (10.2%) were the main components. Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of EO and 1,8-cineole were determined in vitro. The cytotoxicity of the EO was evaluated against SH-SY5Y cell line, as well as the influence of the EO on the expression of adenylate cyclase 1 (ADCY1), suggesting possible oil effects on the Central Nervous System.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170607
[Lr] Last revision date:170607
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27982689
[Au] Autor:Casamassima D; Chiosi F; Vizzarri F; Palazzo M; Costagliola C
[Ad] Address:Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. francesco.vizzarri@unimol.it.
[Ti] Title:The effect of Laurus nobilis on the blood and lenses antioxidant activity in rabbit under fat-enriched diet.
[So] Source:Physiol Res;66(2):325-333, 2017 May 04.
[Is] ISSN:1802-9973
[Cp] Country of publication:Czech Republic
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fat-enriched diet is strongly associated with cataract development. Laurus nobilis shows antioxidant activity. Herein we evaluated the effect of Laurus nobilis oral administration on the blood and lenses antioxidant activity in rabbits under fat-enriched diet. Sixty rabbits divided into 4 groups were used. One group represented the control (N-CTR). The second group (P-CTR) fed a diet supplemented with 2.5 % of pig fat; the third group (EXP1) received a diet supplemented with 2.5 % of pig fat and 1 g/kg of dried-bay leaves; the fourth group (EXP2) was treated with dried-bay leaves at the rate of 1 g/kg of feed. At baseline and at the end of the study (56 days) the following blood parameters were determined: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), total phenols, superoxide dismutase (SOD), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC(pca)), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), retinol and alfa-tocopherol. At the end of the follow-up, the eyes were enucleated and the antioxidant profile, such as total antioxidant activity (TAC), TBARS, retinol and alfa-tocopherol of lenses was evaluated. Plasma ROMs and TBARS levels were statistically lower in the groups receiving bay leaves integration. A significant increase of plasma retinol, FRAP and ORAC(pca) levels was found in EXP1 and EXP2 groups, whereas plasma alfa-tocopherol resulted statistically higher only in EXP2 group. Bay leaves supplementation enhanced TAC, retinol and alfa-tocopherol in rabbit lens, particularly in EXP2 group; whereas lenses TBARS levels significantly decreased in both treated groups. These findings demonstrate that Laurus nobilis oral administration exerts a protective effect on the risk of cataract development in rabbits under fat-enriched diet.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 170504
[Lr] Last revision date:170504
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 220 MEDLINE  
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Rosalen, Pedro Luiz
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[PMID]: 27771586
[Au] Autor:Peixoto LR; Rosalen PL; Ferreira GL; Freires IA; de Carvalho FG; Castellano LR; de Castro RD
[Ad] Address:Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba (UFPB), João Pessoa, 58051-900, Paraíba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Antifungal activity, mode of action and anti-biofilm effects of Laurus nobilis Linnaeus essential oil against Candida spp.
[So] Source:Arch Oral Biol;73:179-185, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1506
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The present study demonstrated the antifungal potential of the chemically characterized essential oil (EO) of Laurus nobilis L. (bay laurel) against Candida spp. biofilm adhesion and formation, and further established its mode of action on C. albicans. METHODS: L. nobilis EO was obtained and tested for its minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC/MFC) against Candida spp., as well as for interaction with cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability. Then we evaluated its effects on the adhesion, formation, and reduction of 48hC. albicans biofilms. The EO phytochemical profile was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). RESULTS: The MIC and MFC values of the EO ranged from (250 to 500) µg/mL. The MIC values increased in the presence of sorbitol (osmotic protector) and ergosterol, which indicates that the EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability, respectively. At 2 MIC the EO disrupted initial adhesion of C. albicans biofilms (p<0.05) and affected biofilm formation with no difference compared to nystatin (p>0.05). When applied for 1min, every 8h, for 24h and 48h, the EO reduced the amount of C. albicans mature biofilm with no difference in relation to nystatin (p>0.05). The phytochemical analysis identified isoeugenol as the major compound (53.49%) in the sample. CONCLUSIONS: L. nobilis EO has antifungal activity probably due to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in its composition. This EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane permeability, and showed deleterious effects against C. albicans biofilms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/pharmacology
Biofilms/drug effects
Candida/drug effects
Laurus/chemistry
Oils, Volatile/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antifungal Agents/chemistry
Antifungal Agents/isolation & purification
Candida/metabolism
Candida/physiology
Candida albicans/drug effects
Candida albicans/growth & development
Cell Membrane Permeability/drug effects
Ergosterol/pharmacology
Eugenol/analogs & derivatives
Eugenol/pharmacology
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/methods
Monoterpenes/pharmacology
Nystatin/pharmacology
Oils, Volatile/chemistry
Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Sesquiterpenes/pharmacology
Sorbitol/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Oils, Volatile); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Sesquiterpenes); 1400-61-9 (Nystatin); 3T8H1794QW (Eugenol); 506T60A25R (Sorbitol); 5M0MWY797U (isoeugenol); Z30RAY509F (Ergosterol)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170426
[Lr] Last revision date:170426
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161023
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27568784
[Au] Autor:Paulsen E
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, 5000, Odense C, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Systemic allergic dermatitis caused by sesquiterpene lactones.
[So] Source:Contact Dermatitis;76(1):1-10, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0536
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients with Compositae sensitization are routinely warned against the ingestion of vegetables, spices, teas and herbal remedies from this family of plants. The evidence for the occurrence of systemic allergic dermatitis caused by sesquiterpene lactone-containing plants is mostly anecdotal and based on statements from patients rather than scientific data. However, a few clinical reports on accidental sensitization and exposure and oral challenge prove the existence of this kind of reaction, most convincingly for strong contact allergens such as costunolide in bay leaves, and less so for weak allergens such as those of lettuce. Other Compositae species suspected of causing systemic reactions are artichoke, mugwort, yarrow, dandelion, feverfew, and elecampane. Some Compositae vegetables and teas, such as lettuce and chamomile tea, may induce systemic reactions through both humoral and cell-mediated mechanisms. It is difficult to disentangle the contribution of these reactions to both local and systemic symptoms of skin and mucous membranes in, for example, lettuce contact allergy. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of systemic allergic dermatitis caused by sesquiterpene lactones, and to clarify the pathogenesis for individual haptens.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Allergens/adverse effects
Asteraceae/adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/etiology
Food Hypersensitivity/etiology
Lactones/adverse effects
Sesquiterpenes/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Allergens); 0 (Lactones); 0 (Sesquiterpenes); 4IK578SA7Z (costunolide)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170418
[Lr] Last revision date:170418
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160829
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/cod.12671

  9 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28087368
[Au] Autor:Menendez-Baceta G; Pardo-de-Santayana M; Aceituno-Mata L; Tardío J; Reyes-García V
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Darwin 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Trends in wild food plants uses in Gorbeialdea (Basque Country).
[So] Source:Appetite;112:9-16, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite wild food plants' potential nutritional and economic value, their knowledge and consumption is quickly decreasing throughout the world. We examine how the consideration that a wild plant use is within the cultural tradition of a given area relates to its consumption by analysing 1) current perception and 2) past and present use of six wild plants' food-uses, of which only three are locally perceived as being part of the local tradition. Research was conducted in Gorbeialdea, an area in the Basque Country with a clearly marked Basque identity opposed to the Spanish identity. Overall, there is a clear decrease in the knowledge and consumption of the selected uses and especially of the three uses acquired from local sources (i.e., the consumption of the raw leaves of Fagus sylvatica and Rumex acetosa and of the fruits of Pyrus cordata). The trend is likely driven by the disappearance of the traditional agrarian lifestyle. Among the uses not acquired from local sources, the use recently adopted from another Basque-speaking area (i.e., macerating the fruits of Prunus spinosa to elaborate a liqueur) is now considered part of the local tradition by young generations, whereas the use acquired from southern Spanish migrants (i.e., using Laurus nobilis leaves as condiments) is not. While lifestyle changes largely explain overall trends in wild edibles consumption, other cultural aspects -in our case study the stigmatization of a given source of information associated to cultural identity- might help shape which new uses of wild plants become embedded in local traditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170309
[Lr] Last revision date:170309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28231123
[Au] Autor:Rafiq R; Hayek SA; Anyanwu U; Hardy BI; Giddings VL; Ibrahim SA; Tahergorabi R; Kang HW
[Ad] Address:Food and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA. rrafiq@aggies.ncat.edu.
[Ti] Title:Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Essential Oils from Artemisia herba-alba Asso., Pelargonium capitatum × radens and Laurus nobilis L.
[So] Source:Foods;5(2), 2016 Apr 11.
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Essential oils are natural antimicrobials that have the potential to provide a safer alternative to synthetic antimicrobials currently used in the food industry. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oils from white wormwood, rose-scented geranium and bay laurel against and O157:H7 on fresh produce and to examine consumer acceptability of fresh produce treated with these essential oils. Our results showed that essential oil derived from rose-scented geranium exhibited the most effective antimicrobial activity at the same and similar minimum inhibition concentration levels (0.4%, / and 0.4% and 0.5%, / ) respectively against and O157:H7. All three essential oils showed antioxidant properties, with the highest activity occurring in bay laurel essential oil. In a sensory test, tomatoes, cantaloupe and spinach sprayed with 0.4% rose-scented geranium essential oil received higher scores by panelists. In conclusion, rose-scented geranium essential oil could be developed into a natural antimicrobial to prevent contamination of and O157:H7 in fresh produce, plus this oil would provide additional health benefits due to the antioxidant properties of its residue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170223
[Lr] Last revision date:170223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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