Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29193257
[Au] Autor:Kourghi M; Pei JV; De Ieso ML; Nourmohammadi S; Chow PH; Yool AJ
[Ad] Address:Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Fundamental structural and functional properties of Aquaporin ion channels found across the kingdoms of life.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol;45(4):401-409, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1440-1681
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aquaporin (AQP) channels in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) family are known to facilitate transmembrane water fluxes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Some classes of AQPs also conduct ions, glycerol, urea, CO , nitric oxide, and other small solutes. Ion channel activity has been demonstrated for mammalian AQPs 0, 1, 6, Drosophila Big Brain (BIB), soybean nodulin 26, and rockcress AtPIP2;1. More classes are likely to be discovered. Newly identified blockers are providing essential tools for establishing physiological roles of some of the AQP dual water and ion channels. For example, the arylsulfonamide AqB011 which selectively blocks the central ion pore of mammalian AQP1 has been shown to impair migration of HT29 colon cancer cells. Traditional herbal medicines are sources of selective AQP1 inhibitors that also slow cancer cell migration. The finding that plant AtPIP2;1 expressed in root epidermal cells mediates an ion conductance regulated by calcium and protons provided insight into molecular mechanisms of environmental stress responses. Expression of lens MIP (AQP0) is essential for maintaining the structure, integrity and transparency of the lens, and Drosophila BIB contributes to neurogenic signalling pathways to control the developmental fate of fly neuroblast cells; however, the ion channel roles remain to be defined for MIP and BIB. A broader portfolio of pharmacological agents is needed to investigate diverse AQP ion channel functions in situ. Understanding the dual water and ion channel roles of AQPs could inform the development of novel agents for rational interventions in diverse challenges from agriculture to human health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/1440-1681.12900

  2 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29236942
[Au] Autor:Yokawa K; Kagenishi T; Pavlovic A; Gall S; Weiland M; Mancuso S; Baluska F
[Ad] Address:IZMB, University of Bonn, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Anaesthetics stop diverse plant organ movements, affect endocytic vesicle recycling and ROS homeostasis, and block action potentials in Venus flytraps.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;, 2017 Dec 11.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Anaesthesia for medical purposes was introduced in the 19th century. However, the physiological mode of anaesthetic drug actions on the nervous system remains unclear. One of the remaining questions is how these different compounds, with no structural similarities and even chemically inert elements such as the noble gas xenon, act as anaesthetic agents inducing loss of consciousness. The main goal here was to determine if anaesthetics affect the same or similar processes in plants as in animals and humans. Methods: A single-lens reflex camera was used to follow organ movements in plants before, during and after recovery from exposure to diverse anaesthetics. Confocal microscopy was used to analyse endocytic vesicle trafficking. Electrical signals were recorded using a surface AgCl electrode. Key Results: Mimosa leaves, pea tendrils, Venus flytraps and sundew traps all lost both their autonomous and touch-induced movements after exposure to anaesthetics. In Venus flytrap, this was shown to be due to the loss of action potentials under diethyl ether anaesthesia. The same concentration of diethyl ether immobilized pea tendrils. Anaesthetics also impeded seed germination and chlorophyll accumulation in cress seedlings. Endocytic vesicle recycling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, as observed in intact Arabidopsis root apex cells, were also affected by all anaesthetics tested. Conclusions: Plants are sensitive to several anaesthetics that have no structural similarities. As in animals and humans, anaesthetics used at appropriate concentrations block action potentials and immobilize organs via effects on action potentials, endocytic vesicle recycling and ROS homeostasis. Plants emerge as ideal model objects to study general questions related to anaesthesia, as well as to serve as a suitable test system for human anaesthesia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx155

  3 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351563
[Au] Autor:Ates D; Aldemir S; Alsaleh A; Erdogmus S; Nemli S; Kahriman A; Ozkan H; Vandenberg A; Tanyolac B
[Ad] Address:Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:A consensus linkage map of lentil based on DArT markers from three RIL mapping populations.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191375, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris Medikus) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14), self-pollinating grain legume with a haploid genome size of about 4 Gbp and is grown throughout the world with current annual production of 4.9 million tonnes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A consensus map of lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris Medikus) was constructed using three different lentils recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, including "CDC Redberry" x "ILL7502" (LR8), "ILL8006" x "CDC Milestone" (LR11) and "PI320937" x "Eston" (LR39). RESULTS: The lentil consensus map was composed of 9,793 DArT markers, covered a total of 977.47 cM with an average distance of 0.10 cM between adjacent markers and constructed 7 linkage groups representing 7 chromosomes of the lentil genome. The consensus map had no gap larger than 12.67 cM and only 5 gaps were found to be between 12.67 cM and 6.0 cM (on LG3 and LG4). The localization of the SNP markers on the lentil consensus map were in general consistent with their localization on the three individual genetic linkage maps and the lentil consensus map has longer map length, higher marker density and shorter average distance between the adjacent markers compared to the component linkage maps. CONCLUSION: This high-density consensus map could provide insight into the lentil genome. The consensus map could also help to construct a physical map using a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library and map based cloning studies. Sequence information of DArT may help localization of orientation scaffolds from Next Generation Sequencing data.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lens Plant/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromosome Mapping/methods
Consensus Sequence
DNA, Plant/genetics
Genetic Linkage
Genome, Plant
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191375

  4 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501632
[Au] Autor:Manning JC; Caballero GG; Knospe C; Kaltner H; Gabius HJ
[Ad] Address:Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Three-step monitoring of glycan and galectin profiles in the anterior segment of the adult chicken eye.
[So] Source:Ann Anat;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0402
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A histochemical three-step approach is applied for processing a panel of sections that covers the different regions of fixed anterior segment of the adult chicken eye. This analysis gains insight into the presence of binding partners for functional pairing by galectin/lectin recognition in situ. Glycophenotyping with 11 fungal and plant lectins (step 1) revealed a complex pattern of reactivity with regional as well as glycan- and cell-type-dependent differences. When characterizing expression of the complete set of the seven adhesion/growth-regulatory chicken galectins immunohistochemically (step 2), the same holds true, clearly demonstrating profiles with individual properties, even for the CG1A/B paralogue pair. Testing this set of labeled tissue lectins as probes (step 3) detected binding sites in a galectin-type-dependent manner. The results of steps 2 and 3 reflect the divergence of sequences and argue against functional redundancy among the galectins. These data shape the concept of an in situ network of galectins. As consequence, experimental in vitro studies will need to be performed from the level of testing a single protein to work with mixtures that mimic the (patho)physiological situation, - a key message of this report.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29463032
[Au] Autor:Peng J; Liu F; Shen T; Ye L; Kong W; Wang W; Liu X; He Y
[Ad] Address:College of Biosystems Engineering and Food science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China. jypeng@zju.edu.cn.
[Ti] Title:Comparative Study of the Detection of Chromium Content in Rice Leaves by 532 nm and 1064 nm Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.
[So] Source:Sensors (Basel);18(2), 2018 Feb 18.
[Is] ISSN:1424-8220
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fast detection of toxic metals in crops is important for monitoring pollution and ensuring food safety. In this study, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to detect the chromium content in rice leaves. We investigated the influence of laser wavelength (532 nm and 1064 nm excitation), along with the variations of delay time, pulse energy, and lens-to-sample distance (LTSD), on the signal (sensitivity and stability) and plasma features (temperature and electron density). With the optimized experimental parameters, univariate analysis was used for quantifying the chromium content, and several preprocessing methods (including background normalization, area normalization, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) transformation and standardized normal variate (SNV) transformation were used to further improve the analytical performance. The results indicated that 532 nm excitation showed better sensitivity than 1064 nm excitation, with a detection limit around two times lower. However, the prediction accuracy for both excitation wavelengths was similar. The best result, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9849, root-mean-square error of 3.89 mg/kg and detection limit of 2.72 mg/kg, was obtained using the SNV transformed signal (Cr I 425.43 nm) induced by 532 nm excitation. The results indicate the inspiring capability of LIBS for toxic metals detection in plant materials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29230535
[Au] Autor:Syngelaki M; Hardner M; Oberthuer P; Bley T; Schneider D; Lenk F
[Ad] Address:Chair of Bioprocess Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Institute of Natural Materials Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A new method for non-invasive biomass determination based on stereo photogrammetry.
[So] Source:Bioprocess Biosyst Eng;41(3):369-380, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1615-7605
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A novel, non-destructive method for the biomass estimation of biological samples on culture dishes was developed. To achieve this, a photogrammetric system, which consists of a digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR), an illuminated platform where the culture dishes are positioned and an Arduino board which controls the capturing process, was constructed. The camera was mounted on a holder which set the camera at different title angles and the platform rotated, to capture images from different directions. A software, based on stereo photogrammetry, was developed for the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the samples. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated in a series of experiments with plant tissue cultures and specifically with calli cultures of Salvia fruticosa and Ocimum basilicum. For a period of 14 days images of these cultures were acquired and 3D-reconstructions and volumetric data were obtained. The volumetric data correlated well with the experimental measurements and made the calculation of the specific growth rate, µ , possible. The µ value for S. fruticosa samples was 0.14 day and for O. basilicum 0.16 day . The developed method demonstrated the high potential of this photogrammetric approach in the biological sciences.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180217
[Lr] Last revision date:180217
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00449-017-1871-2

  7 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346404
[Au] Autor:Kumar S; Choudhary AK; Rana KS; Sarker A; Singh M
[Ad] Address:ICAR-National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Pusa, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Bio-fortification potential of global wild annual lentil core collection.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191122, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lentil, generally known as poor man's' meat due to its high protein value is also a good source of dietary fiber, antioxidants and vitamins along with fast cooking characteristics. It could be used globally as a staple food crop to eradicate hidden hunger, if this nutritionally rich crop is further enriched with essential minerals. This requires identification of essential mineral rich germplasm. So, in the present study, a core set of 96 wild accessions extracted from 405 global wild annual collections comprising different species was analyzed to determine its bio-fortification potential. Impressive variation (mg/100 g) was observed for different minerals including Na (30-318), K (138.29-1578), P (37.50-593.75), Ca (4.74-188.75), Mg (15-159), Fe (2.82-14.12), Zn (1.29-12.62), Cu (0.5-7.12), Mn (1.22-9.99), Mo (1.02-11.89), Ni (0.16-3.49), Pb (0.01-0.58), Cd (0-0.03), Co (0-0.63) and As (0-0.02). Hierarchical clustering revealed high intra- and inter-specific variability. Further, correlation study showed positive significant association among minerals and between minerals including agro-morphological traits. Accessions representation from Turkey and Syria had maximum variability for different minerals. Diversity analysis exhibited wide geographical variations across gene-pool in core set. Potential use of the identified trait-specific genetic resources could be initial genetic material, for genetic base broadening and biofortification of cultivated lentil.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lens Plant
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Lens Plant/chemistry
Lens Plant/classification
Minerals/analysis
Nutritive Value
Principal Component Analysis
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Minerals)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191122

  8 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29267293
[Au] Autor:Liu S; Xing Z; Wang Z; Tian S; Jahun FR
[Ad] Address:College of Engineering, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang, China.
[Ti] Title:Development of machine-vision system for gap inspection of muskmelon grafted seedlings.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189732, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Grafting robots have been developed in the world, but some auxiliary works such as gap-inspecting for grafted seedlings still need to be done by human. An machine-vision system of gap inspection for grafted muskmelon seedlings was developed in this study. The image acquiring system consists of a CCD camera, a lens and a front white lighting source. The image of inspected gap was processed and analyzed by software of HALCON 12.0. The recognition algorithm for the system is based on principle of deformable template matching. A template should be created from an image of qualified grafted seedling gap. Then the gap image of the grafted seedling will be compared with the created template to determine their matching degree. Based on the similarity between the gap image of grafted seedling and the template, the matching degree will be 0 to 1. The less similar for the grafted seedling gap with the template the smaller of matching degree. Thirdly, the gap will be output as qualified or unqualified. If the matching degree of grafted seedling gap and the template is less than 0.58, or there is no match is found, the gap will be judged as unqualified; otherwise the gap will be qualified. Finally, 100 muskmelon seedlings were grafted and inspected to test the gap inspection system. Results showed that the gap inspection machine-vision system could recognize the gap qualification correctly as 98% of human vision. And the inspection speed of this system can reach 15 seedlings·min-1. The gap inspection process in grafting can be fully automated with this developed machine-vision system, and the gap inspection system will be a key step of a fully-automatic grafting robots.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cucurbitaceae
Photography/instrumentation
Seedlings
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189732

  9 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27773703
[Au] Autor:Hirano M; Totani K; Fukuda T; Gu J; Suzuki A
[Ad] Address:Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292, Japan; Department of Materials and Life Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijoji-kita, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8633, Japan. Electronic address: mhirano@st.seikei.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:N-Glycoform-dependent interactions of megalin with its ligands.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1861(1 Pt A):3106-3118, 2017 01.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Megalin is a 600-kDa single-spanning transmembrane glycoprotein and functions as an endocytic receptor, distributed not only in the kidney but also in other tissues. Structurally and functionally distinct ligands for megalin have been identified. Megalin has 30 potential N-glycosylation sites in its extracellular domain. We found that megalin interacts with its ligands in a glycoform-dependent manner. METHODS: Distribution of megalin and glycans was histochemically analyzed in mouse kidneys. Kidney absorption of Cy5-labeled ligands was examined in vivo. Megalin-ligand interactions were analyzed using ligand blotting and ELISA. RESULTS: Megalins expressed on renal proximal convoluted tubules (PCTs) and proximal straight tubules (PSTs) have different N-glycans. PCT megalin stained with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), which recognizes core-fucosyl N-glycans catalyzed by α1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8). In contrast, PST megalin stained with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which recognizes hybrid-type N-glycans. Retinol-binding protein-Cy5 (RBP-Cy5) was endocytosed by megalin on PCTs but minimally endocytosed by PSTs. BSA-Cy5 was endocytosed nearly equally by both tubules. The purified LCA-positive glycoform megalin had higher binding activity for RBP and vitamin D-binding protein than did WGA-positive glycoform megalin. Both glycoforms had nearly the same BSA- and kanamycin-binding activities. RBP-binding analysis of megalin lacking core fucose, in Fut8 mouse kidneys, had significantly decreased binding activity. CONCLUSIONS: N-Glycosylation of megalin can modulate its ligand-binding activity. Core fucosylation, in particular, is a modification crucial for megalin-RBP interactions. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Cell type-specific glycoforms of megalin exist in the proximal tubular cells and modulate ligand absorption capacity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-2/metabolism
Polysaccharides/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Carbocyanines/metabolism
Chromatography, Affinity
Female
Fucosyltransferases/deficiency
Fucosyltransferases/metabolism
Glycosylation
Kidney/metabolism
Kidney Tubules, Proximal/cytology
Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism
Ligands
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Knockout
Organ Specificity
Plant Lectins/metabolism
Protein Binding
Retinol-Binding Proteins/metabolism
Wheat Germ Agglutinins/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carbocyanines); 0 (Ligands); 0 (Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-2); 0 (Plant Lectins); 0 (Polysaccharides); 0 (Retinol-Binding Proteins); 0 (Wheat Germ Agglutinins); 0 (cyanine dye 5); 0 (lentil lectin); EC 2.4.1.- (Fucosyltransferases); EC 2.4.1.68 (Glycoprotein 6-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161107
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 1521 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28946315
[Au] Autor:Nosworthy MG; Medina G; Franczyk AJ; Neufeld J; Appah P; Utioh A; Frohlich P; House JD
[Ad] Address:Department of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3 T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: matthew.nosworthy@umanitoba.ca.
[Ti] Title:Effect of processing on the in vitro and in vivo protein quality of red and green lentils (Lens culinaris).
[So] Source:Food Chem;240:588-593, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:0308-8146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In order to determine the effect of extrusion, baking and cooking on the protein quality of red and green lentils, a rodent bioassay was conducted and compared to an in vitro method of protein quality determination. On average, the Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score of red lentils (55.0) was higher than that of green lentils (50.8). Extruded lentil flour had higher scores (63.01 red, 57.09 green) than either cooked (57.40 red, 52.92 green) or baked (53.84 red, 47.14 green) flours. The average Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score of red lentils (0.54) was higher than green lentils (0.49). The Protein Efficiency Ratio of the extruded lentil flours (1.30 red, 1.34 green) was higher than that of the baked flour (0.98 red, 1.09 green). A correlation was found between in vivo and in vitro methods of determining protein digestibility (R =0.8934). This work could influence selection of processing method during product development.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lens Plant
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cooking
Dietary Proteins
Digestion
Flour
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Dietary Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170927
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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