Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29188770
[Au] Autor:Afarnegan H; Shahraki A; Shahraki J
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran.
[Ti] Title:The hepatoprotective effects of aquatic extract of Levisticum officinale against paraquat hepatocyte toxicity.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;30(6(Supplementary)):2363-2368, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Paraquat is extensively used as a strong nitrogen-based herbicide for controlling weeds in agriculture. This herbicide is extremely toxic to humans and induces multiorgan failure due to accumulation in the cells. So far, many instances of fatal poisoning have been reported. Paraquat is metabolized primarily in the liver. Accordingly, the effects of aquatic Levisticum officinale extract on biochemical factors and oxidative status were evaluated in hepatocytes exposed to paraquat in this study. The results showed that paraquat-induced hepatocyte destruction is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The aquatic extracts of Levisticum officinale (100, 200, and 300µg/mL) could prevent lipid peroxidation and reduction in the potential of mitochondrial membranes (P<0.05). The antioxidants, ROS scavengers (mannitol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and α-tocopherol), and mitochondrial permeability transition pore-sealing agent (carnitine) inhibited the effects of paraquat. The pore-sealing compound inhibited hepatotoxicity, indicating that paraquat induces cell death via mitochondrial pathways. Hepatic cell death due to paraquat could be prevented by hepatocyte pretreatment with aquatic Levisticum officinale extracts, antioxidants, and ROS scavengers; therefore, oxidative stress might directly reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, paraquat hepatotoxicity may be associated with oxidative stress and maintained by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Levisticum officinale aquatic extract, presumably due to its strong antioxidant properties, could protect against the destructive effects of paraquat on rat hepatocytes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171130
[Lr] Last revision date:171130
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28160212
[Au] Autor:León A; Del-Ángel M; Ávila JL; Delgado G
[Ad] Address:Department of Natural Products, Institute of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, Mexico City, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Phthalides: Distribution in Nature, Chemical Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity.
[So] Source:Prog Chem Org Nat Prod;104:127-246, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2191-7043
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phthalides are a relatively small group of natural compounds confined to several plant families and some genera of fungi and liverworts. They are divided into two structural groups, the monomeric and dimeric phthalides, and known mainly as bioactive constituents of different plant species used traditionally for medicinal purposes in Asia, Europe, and North America.The first reports on the chemistry of phthalides appeared at the end of the nineteenth century, in which they were identified as the odor constituents of the essential oil of celery (Apium graveolens) by Ciamician and Silber (1897). In the first half of the last century, phthalides were isolated from Cnidium officinale and Ligusticum acutilobum, species widely used in Asian traditional medicine, and from Levisticum officinale, a species used as food and condiment. Throughout the second part of the twentieth century, phthalides have been characterized from several plant families, namely Asteraceae, Leguminosae, Orchidaceae and Rutaceae, among others, but mainly from the Umbelliferae (syn Apiaceae) family, and the major contributors have been the following species used in traditional medicine: Ligusticum chuanxiong (Chinese name: Chuanxiong), Angelica sinensis (Chinese name: Danggui), Cnidium officinale (Japanese name: Senkyu), Angelica acutiloba (Japanese name: Toki), and Ligusticum porteri (Hispanic name: Oshá). Phthalides are also constituents of several genera of fungi, such as Penicillium, Alternaria and Pestalotiopsis, and some liverworts.Different chromatographic, spectrometric, and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been used for the isolation and structural characterization of phthalides in extracts, and for assessing the quality of plant material containing this type of compound. Isotopic labeling has established the biosynthesis of phthalides via linkage of acetate units forming polyketide intermediates.Chemical transformations of monomeric phthalides have included oxidation, reduction, addition, elimination, and cycloaddition reactions, and treatments with Lewis acids of (Z)-ligustilide have afforded linear dimers. Some intramolecular condensations and differentiated cyclizations of the dimeric phthalides have been carried out, providing evidences for the particular chemical reactivity of these compounds.Several structural modifications of phthalides have been carried out subjecting them to microbial transformations by different species of bacteria, fungi and algae, and these included resolutions of racemic mixtures and oxidations, among others.The [π4s + π2s] and [π2s + π2s] cycloadditions of (Z)-ligustilide for the synthesis of dimeric phthalides have been reported, and different approaches involving cyclizations, Alder-Rickert reactions, Sharpless asymmetric hydroxylations, or Grignard additions have been used for the synthesis of monomeric phthalides. The use of phthalides as building blocks for divergent oriented synthesis has been proven.Many of the naturally occurring phthalides display different biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory effects, among many others, with a considerable recent research on the topic. In the case of compounds isolated from the Apiaceae, the bioactivities correlate with the traditional medicinal uses of the natural sources. Some monomeric phthalides have shown their ability to attenuate certain neurological diseases, including stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.The present contribution covers the distribution of phthalides in nature and the findings in the structural diversity, chemical reactivity, biotransformations, syntheses, and bioactivity of natural and semisynthetic phthalides.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Benzofurans
Fungi/chemistry
Plants/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Benzofurans/analysis
Benzofurans/chemistry
Benzofurans/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Benzofurans); 8VV922U86J (phthalide)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170620
[Lr] Last revision date:170620
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-45618-8_2

  3 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26938512
[Au] Autor:Kim WJ; Moon BC; Yang S; Han KS; Choi G; Lee AY
[Ad] Address:K-herb Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811, Korea. ukgene@kiom.re.kr.
[Ti] Title:Rapid Authentication of the Herbal Medicine Plant Species Aralia continentalis Kitag. and Angelica biserrata C.Q. Yuan and R.H. Shan Using ITS2 Sequences and Multiplex-SCAR Markers.
[So] Source:Molecules;21(3):270, 2016 Feb 29.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Accurate identification of the plant species that are present in herbal medicines is important for quality control. Although the dried roots of Aralia continentalis (Araliae Continentalis Radix) and Angelica biserrata (Angelicae Pubescentis Radix) are used in the same traditional medicine, namely Dok-Hwal in Korean and Du-Huo in Chinese, the medicines are described differently in the national pharmacopeia. Further confusion arises from the distribution of dried Levisticum officinale and Heracleum moellendorffii roots as the same medicine. Medicinal ingredients from all four plants are morphologically similar, and discrimination is difficult using conventional methods. Molecular identification methods offer rapidity and accuracy. The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) was sequenced in all four plant species, and the sequences were used to design species-specific primers. Primers for each species were then combined to allow sample analysis in a single PCR reaction. Commercial herbal medicine samples were obtained from Korea and China and analyzed using the multiplex assay. The assay successfully identified authentic medicines and also identified inauthentic or adulterated samples. The multiplex assay will be a useful tool for identification of authentic Araliae Continentalis Radix and/or Angelicae Pubescentis Radix preparations in Korea and China.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angelica/classification
Aralia/classification
DNA Fingerprinting/methods
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/analysis
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angelica/genetics
Aralia/genetics
DNA Primers/genetics
DNA, Plant/analysis
Genetic Markers/genetics
Phylogeny
Plants, Medicinal/classification
Plants, Medicinal/genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA Primers); 0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal Spacer); 0 (Genetic Markers)
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160304
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26669116
[Au] Autor:Zhang C; Mei Z; Cheng J; He Y; Khan MA; Luo P; Imani S; Fu J
[Ti] Title:Development of SCAR Markers Based on Improved RAPD Amplification Fragments and Molecular Cloning for Authentication of Herbal Medicines Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale.
[So] Source:Nat Prod Commun;10(10):1743-7, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1934-578X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Molecular cloning from DNA fragments of improved RAPD amplification of Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutiloba and Levisticum officinale, provided novel sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers A13, A23, A1-34 and A1-0 whose sequences were deposited in the GenBank database with the accession numbers KP641315, KP641316, KP641317 and KP641318, respectively. By optional PCR amplification, the SCAR markers A13 and A23 are Levisticum officinale-specific, whereas the SCAR marker A1-34 is Angelica acutiloba-specific, and the SCAR marker A1-0 is Angelica sinensis-specific. These diagnostic SCAR markers may be useful for genetic authentications, for ecological conservation of all three medicinal plants and as a helpful tool for the genetic authentication of adulterant samples.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angelica/genetics
Genetic Markers
Levisticum/genetics
Plant Preparations/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angelica/chemistry
Base Sequence
China
Cloning, Molecular
DNA, Plant/genetics
Demography
Levisticum/chemistry
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (Genetic Markers); 0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 151216
[Lr] Last revision date:151216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151217
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24961287
[Au] Autor:Yuan QJ; Zhang B; Jiang D; Zhang WJ; Lin TY; Wang NH; Chiou SJ; Huang LQ
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Dao-di Herbs, National Resource Center for Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100700, China.
[Ti] Title:Identification of species and materia medica within Angelica L. (Umbelliferae) based on phylogeny inferred from DNA barcodes.
[So] Source:Mol Ecol Resour;15(2):358-71, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1755-0998
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:DNA barcodes have been increasingly used in authentication of medicinal plants, while their wide application in materia medica is limited in their accuracy due to incomplete sampling of species and absence of identification for materia medica. In this study, 95 leaf accessions of 23 species (including one variety) and materia medica of three Pharmacopoeia-recorded species of Angelica in China were collected to evaluate the effectiveness of four DNA barcodes (rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA and ITS). Our results showed that ITS provided the best discriminatory power by resolving 17 species as monophyletic lineages without shared alleles and exhibited the largest barcoding gap among the four single barcodes. The phylogenetic analysis of ITS showed that Levisticum officinale and Angelica sinensis were sister taxa, which indicates that L. officinale should be considered as a species of Angelica. The combination of ITS + rbcL + matK + trnH-psbA performed slight better discriminatory power than ITS, recovering 23 species without shared alleles and 19 species as monophyletic clades in ML tree. Authentication of materia medica using ITS revealed that the decoction pieces of A. sinensis and A. biserrata were partially adulterated with those of L. officinale, and the temperature around 80 °C processing A. dahurica decoction pieces obviously reduced the efficiency of PCR and sequencing. The examination of two cultivated varieties of A. dahurica from different localities indicated that the four DNA barcodes are inefficient for discriminating geographical authenticity of conspecific materia medica. This study provides an empirical paradigm in identification of medicinal plants and their materia medica using DNA barcodes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angelica/classification
Angelica/genetics
DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic/methods
Materia Medica/isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Plants, Medicinal/classification
Plants, Medicinal/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: China
Cluster Analysis
DNA, Plant/chemistry
DNA, Plant/genetics
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/chemistry
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/genetics
Levisticum/classification
Levisticum/genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal Spacer); 0 (Materia Medica)
[Em] Entry month:1510
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140626
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1755-0998.12296

  6 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24338945
[Au] Autor:Zawirska-Wojtasiak R; Wojtowicz E; Przygonski K; Olkowicz M
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Poznan University of Life Sciences, PL-60-637, Poznan, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Chlorogenic acid in raw materials for the production of chicory coffee.
[So] Source:J Sci Food Agric;94(10):2118-23, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0010
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chicory coffee is produced from traditional raw materials. Other materials are added to improve its aroma. The aim of this study was to test new raw materials with a high content of chlorogenic acid (CGA) as the criterion for their selection. This acid is degraded in the course of roasting and is a source of phenolic compounds affecting coffee aroma. For this reason, contents of CGAs were analyzed in traditional and new materials before and after roasting and compared with the chemicals formed in the roasted pure standard of chlorogenic acid (5-CQA). RESULTS: It was shown that the novel raw materials contained considerable amounts of 5-CQA, frequently higher than in traditional chicory. The roasting process caused significant losses of 5-CQA in the tested raw materials, amounting to 55-91%. In turn, the analysis of volatile compounds in roasted materials showed the presence of certain phenolic and heterocyclic compounds that were also formed as degradation products of the pure 5-CQA chemical standard. CONCLUSION: Novel raw materials, mainly chokeberry, artichoke and lovage, are rich sources of CGAs, particularly 5-CQA. Their application in the production of chicory coffee may result in an increased content of primarily phenolic compounds in its aroma.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Beverages
Chicory/chemistry
Chlorogenic Acid/analysis
Cynara scolymus/chemistry
Hot Temperature
Levisticum/chemistry
Photinia/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Coffee
Cooking/methods
Humans
Odorants
Phenols/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Coffee); 0 (Phenols); 318ADP12RI (Chlorogenic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 161125
[Lr] Last revision date:161125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jsfa.6532

  7 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24400233
[Au] Autor:Naber KG
[Ad] Address:Technical University, Munich, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety of the phytotherapeutic drug Canephron® N in prevention and treatment of urogenital and gestational disease: review of clinical experience in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.
[So] Source:Res Rep Urol;5:39-46, 2013 Feb 04.
[Is] ISSN:2253-2447
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review evaluates 17 clinical studies from 18 selected publications concerning the safety, tolerability, and additional effects of the phytotherapeutic drug, Canephron® N (CAN, containing the medicinal plants, Centaurium erythraea, Levisticum officinale, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as standard therapy in various clinical settings. Its role in the prophylaxis and treatment of urinary tract infections in adults and in children, therapy and prophylaxis in adult patients with renal stones, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections and other gestational diseases in pregnancy, and also its safety and tolerability. The dosage was as recommended and over a varying duration. Overall, CAN was shown to be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of UTI compared with standard therapy, both in adults and children, and there was a reduced number of relapses. Children undergoing surgical correction of vesicoureteral reflux benefited from a prophylactic course of CAN. Ten-day add on therapy increased the rate of spontaneous elimination of kidney stones compared with standard therapy alone and may also have had a positive effect on stone prevention. Pregnant women showed earlier relief of symptoms and normalization of pyuria on additional treatment with the herbal combination. Only one adverse effect was reported (skin rash) in the 3115 patients included in this review. No teratogenic, embryotoxic, or fetotoxic effects, or negative interference with the psychological development or health of children born of mothers treated with the drug were reported. Because some of the studies were not well designed, their statistical significance remains unclear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140109
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/RRU.S39288

  8 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24380307
[Au] Autor:Li X; Zhang LH; Lv GH; Wang XX; Jiang WD; Jin YQ; Zhao ZZ
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education in China on the Standardization of Chinese Materia Medica, 505323500@qq.com
[Ti] Title:[Comparison on content of ligustilides in different danggui samples].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi;38(17):2838-43, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1001-5302
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:Bioactivity of Danggui is linked to the content of ligustilide, but the relationship between ligustilide with herb shape, cultivating areas and plant species is still unknown. The relationship was investigated by quantifying on the amounts of Z-ligustilide and E-ligustilide by HPLC-DAD-MS method, and then comparing the content of ligustilides (the sum of Z-ligustilide and E-ligustilide) among forty-four various "Danggui" samples containing thirty Chinese Danggui (CDG), six Japanese Danggui (JDG), four Korea Danggui (KDG) and four European Danggui (EDG). Results showed that the content of ligustilides in CDG samples (Angelica sinensis) was in the range of 5.63-24.53 mg x g(-1) with the mean of 11.02 mg x g(-1) (n = 30). Ligustilides amounts were varied among samples cultivated in different areas in China, i. e. 13.90 mg x g(-1) (n = 6) in Yannan, 12.51 mg x g(-1) (n = 6) in Sichuan and 10.04 mg x g(-1) (n = 13) in Gansu. It was also found that ligustilides content was related to the shape, color and fragrance of herb, e. g. the relative larger amount of ligustilides was in the small main root, long rootlet and perfumed sample. Further, ligustilides contents were estimated to be 1.00 mg x g(-1) (n = 6) in JDG samples (A. acutiloba and A. acutiloba var. sugiyamae) and 2.78 mg x g(-1) (n = 2) in EDG samples (lovage root, Levisticum officinale). However, ligustilides could not be detected in the four KDG samples (A. gigas) and two EDG samples (angelica root, A. archangelica). It has been concluded that ligustilide is significant variant among plant species, which may result in the variety of bioactivity and therapeutic effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: 4-Butyrolactone/analogs & derivatives
Angelica sinensis/chemistry
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 4-Butyrolactone/analysis
China
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Geography
Quality Control
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 4431-01-0 (ligustilide); OL659KIY4X (4-Butyrolactone)
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Cu] Class update date: 140101
[Lr] Last revision date:140101
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140102
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23948036
[Au] Autor:Lapeere H; Boone B; Verhaeghe E; Ongenae K; Lambert J
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, 9000, Belgium. hilde.lapeere@ugent.be
[Ti] Title:Contact dermatitis caused by lovage (Levisticum officinalis) essential oil.
[So] Source:Contact Dermatitis;69(3):181-2, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0536
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dermatitis, Contact/etiology
Levisticum/immunology
Oils, Volatile
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dermatitis, Contact/drug therapy
Female
Humans
Patch Tests
Steroids/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Oils, Volatile); 0 (Steroids)
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Cu] Class update date: 130816
[Lr] Last revision date:130816
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130817
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/cod.12082

  10 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 21273597
[Au] Autor:Sertel S; Eichhorn T; Plinkert PK; Efferth T
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Chemical Composition and antiproliferative activity of essential oil from the leaves of a medicinal herb, Levisticum officinale, against UMSCC1 head and neck squamous carcinoma cells.
[So] Source:Anticancer Res;31(1):185-91, 2011 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1791-7530
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a challenging disease with a high mortality rate. Natural products represent a valuable source for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We investigated the cytotoxic potential of essential oil from the leaves of a medicinal plant, Levisticum officinale (lovage) on head and neck squamous carcinoma cells (HNSCC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cytotoxicity of lovage essential oil was investigated on the HNSCC cell line, UMSCC1. Additionally, we performed pharmacogenomics analyses. RESULTS: Lovage essential oil extract had an IC50 value of 292.6 µg/ml. Genes involved in apoptosis, cancer, cellular growth and cell cycle regulation were the most prominently affected in microarray analyses. The three pathways to be most significantly regulated were extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) signaling, integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, virus entry via endocytic pathways and p53 signaling. CONCLUSION: Levisticum officinale essential oil inhibits human HNSCC cell growth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology
Cell Proliferation/drug effects
Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology
Levisticum/chemistry
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Plant Oils/pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Apoptosis/drug effects
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics
Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/genetics
Chromatography, Gas
Gene Expression Profiling
Head and Neck Neoplasms/drug therapy
Head and Neck Neoplasms/genetics
Humans
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Tumor Cells, Cultured
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers, Tumor); 0 (Plant Oils)
[Em] Entry month:1103
[Cu] Class update date: 151119
[Lr] Last revision date:151119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110129
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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