Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lidocaine [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524770
[Au] Autor:Bakonyi M; Gácsi A; Kovács A; Szucs MB; Berkó S; Csányi E
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Regulatory Affairs, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary.
[Ti] Title:Following-up skin penetration of lidocaine from different vehicles by Raman spectroscopic mapping.
[So] Source:J Pharm Biomed Anal;154:1-6, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-264X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The application of local anesthetics, usually administered by subcutaneous injection, is common in the course of diagnostic, therapeutic, and cosmetic dermatology procedures. The effective dermal delivery of lidocaine could offer a solution to many adverse effects caused by needle insertion, such as pain, local reactions or toxicity, and additionally, it avoids the disruption of anatomical landmarks. Therefore, novel dermal formulations of local anesthetics are needed to overcome the barrier function of the skin and provide sufficient and prolonged anesthesia. In our study, we aimed to investigate and compare the penetration profiles of four different lidocaine containing formulations (hydrogel, oleogel, lyotropic liquid crystal and nanostructured lipid carrier) by Raman microscopic mapping of the drug. The application of Raman spectroscopy provided information about the spatial distribution of lidocaine in the skin ex vivo. The penetration of lidocaine from lyotropic liquid crystal and nanostructured carrier reached deeper skin layers and a higher amount of the drug was diffused into the skin, compared with hydrogel and oleogel. This study confirmed that nanostructured carriers can improve skin penetration properties of lidocaine and proved the applicability of Raman spectroscopy in the research of dermatological preparations ex vivo as a nondestructive, relatively easy and fast technique.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520391
[Au] Autor:Lee K; Chung JM; Lee SD
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea.
[Ti] Title:The safety of a mixture of bupivacaine and lidocaine in children after urologic inguinal and scrotal surgery.
[So] Source:Investig Clin Urol;59(2):141-147, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2466-054X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: Local anesthetic agents such as bupivacaine and lidocaine are commonly used after surgery for pain control. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety of a mixture of bupivacaine and lidocaine in children who underwent urologic inguinal and scrotal surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five patients who underwent pediatric urologic outpatient surgeries, were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into three groups according to age (group I: under 2 years, group II: between 3-4 years, and group III: 5 years and above). Patients were further sub-divided into unilateral and bilateral groups. All patients were injected with a mixture of 0.5% bupivacaine and 2% lidocaine (2:1 volume ratio) at the surgical site, just before the surgery ended. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic parameters were measured before local anesthesia, 30 minutes after administration of local anesthesia, and 60 minutes after administration. Results: The patients' mean age was 40.5±39.9 months. All patients had normal hemodynamic and electrocardiographic parameters before local anesthesia, after 30 minutes, and after 60 minutes. Also, results of all intervals were within normal values, when analyzed by age and laterality. No mixture related adverse events (nausea, vomiting, pruritus, sedation, respiratory depression) or those related to electrocardiographic parameters (arrhythmias and asystole) were reported in any patients. Conclusions: A mixture of bupivacaine and lidocaine can be safely used in children undergoing urologic inguinal and scrotal surgery. An appropriate dose has no clinically significant hemodynamic or cardiac changes and adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4111/icu.2018.59.2.141

  3 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28453742
[Au] Autor:Mannhardt I; Eder A; Dumotier B; Prondzynski M; Krämer E; Traebert M; Söhren KD; Flenner F; Stathopoulou K; Lemoine MD; Carrier L; Christ T; Eschenhagen T; Hansen A
[Ad] Address:Department of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Research Center, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Blinded Contractility Analysis in hiPSC-Cardiomyocytes in Engineered Heart Tissue Format: Comparison With Human Atrial Trabeculae.
[So] Source:Toxicol Sci;158(1):164-175, 2017 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0929
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) may serve as a new assay for drug testing in a human context, but their validity particularly for the evaluation of inotropic drug effects remains unclear. In this blinded analysis, we compared the effects of 10 indicator compounds with known inotropic effects in electrically stimulated (1.5 Hz) hiPSC-CM-derived 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) and human atrial trabeculae (hAT). Human EHTs were prepared from iCell hiPSC-CM, hAT obtained at routine heart surgery. Mean intra-batch variation coefficient in baseline force measurement was 17% for EHT and 49% for hAT. The PDE-inhibitor milrinone did not affect EHT contraction force, but increased force in hAT. Citalopram (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), nifedipine (LTCC-blocker) and lidocaine (Na+ channel-blocker) had negative inotropic effects on EHT and hAT. Formoterol (beta-2 agonist) had positive lusitropic but no inotropic effect in EHT, and positive clinotropic, lusitropic, and inotropic effects in hAT. Tacrolimus (calcineurin-inhibitor) had a negative inotropic effect in EHTs, but no effect in hAT. Digoxin (Na+-K+-ATPase-inhibitor) showed a positive inotropic effect only in EHTs, but no effect in hAT probably due to short incubation time. Ryanodine (ryanodine receptor-inhibitor) reduced contraction force in both models. Rolipram and acetylsalicylic acid showed noninterpretable results in hAT. Contraction amplitude and kinetics were more stable over time and less variable in hiPSC-EHTs than hAT. HiPSC-EHT faithfully detected cAMP-dependent and -independent positive and negative inotropic effects, but limited beta-2 adrenergic or PDE3 effects, compatible with an immature CM phenotype.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/toxsci/kfx081

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[PMID]: 29524298
[Au] Autor:Shamai Yamin T; Prihed H; Shifrovitch A; Dagan S; Weissberg A
[Ad] Address:Department of Analytical Chemistry, Israel Institute for Biological Research (IIBR) P.O.B. 19, Ness Ziona, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Oxidation-assisted structural elucidation of compounds containing a tertiary amine side chain using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:J Mass Spectrom;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9888
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A novel analytical technique for the structural elucidation of compounds bearing a tertiary amine side chain via "in vial" instantaneous oxidation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was developed. A series of lidocaine homologues and benzimidazole derivatives with a major/single amine-representative base peak in both their EI-MS and ESI-MS/MS spectra were subjected to oxidation by a 0.1% solution of hydrogen peroxide )including several O/ O exchange experiments(, followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The N-oxide counterparts promoted extensive fragmentation patterns with complete coverage of all parts of the molecule, enabling detailed structural elucidation and unambiguous identification of the un-oxidized analytes at low ng/ml levels.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jms.4081

  5 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29214532
[Au] Autor:Bade R; White JM; Gerber C
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Qualitative and quantitative temporal analysis of licit and illicit drugs in wastewater in Australia using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:Anal Bioanal Chem;410(2):529-542, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1618-2650
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The combination of qualitative and quantitative bimonthly analysis of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is presented. A liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight instrument equipped with Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) was used to qualitatively screen 346 compounds in influent wastewater from two wastewater treatment plants in South Australia over a 14-month period. A total of 100 compounds were confirmed and/or detected using this strategy, with 61 confirmed in all samples including antidepressants (amitriptyline, dothiepin, doxepin), antipsychotics (amisulpride, clozapine), illicit drugs (cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)), and known drug adulterants (lidocaine and tetramisole). A subset of these compounds was also included in a quantitative method, analyzed on a liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The use of illicit stimulants (methamphetamine) showed a clear decrease, levels of opioid analgesics (morphine and methadone) remained relatively stable, while the use of new psychoactive substances (methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Alpha PVP) varied with no visible trend. This work demonstrates the value that high-frequency sampling combined with quantitative and qualitative analysis can deliver. Graphical abstract Temporal analysis of licit and illicit drugs in South Australia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Street Drugs/analysis
Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods
Waste Water/analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Australia
Chromatography, Liquid/methods
Solid Phase Extraction/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Street Drugs); 0 (Waste Water); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00216-017-0747-2

  6 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522291
[Au] Autor:Pazeto CL; Nascimento FJ; Santiago LHS; Glina S
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC (FMABC), Santo André, SP, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Idiosyncratic reaction after injection of polyacrylate - polyalcohol copolymer.
[So] Source:Int Braz J Urol;44, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1677-6119
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Polyacrylate-polyalcohol copolymer is a synthetic product, non-biodegradable, with low rate of therapeutic failure and lower incidence of reactions at the site of injection, when compared to biodegradable agents. We report an unprecedent, exuberant and persistent inflammatory reaction following injection of that substance. PATIENT: A 17 years-old patient with vesico-ureteral reflux and complete pyelocaliceal right duplication was submitted to treatment with polyacrylate-polyalcohol copolymer (STING technique). In the seventh day of post-operatory, she presented intense dysuria and hypogastric pain, without laboratory exams alterations; a symptomatic treatment was started. After two months, the symptoms persisted and an ultrasound detected thickening of bladder wall close to the uretero-vesical junction. After that exam, a cystostopic biopsy showed epithelial hyperplasia with increased edema of lamina propria, suggesting an adverse reaction to the polymer. After four months, there was complete remission, but the reflux persisted with the same grade. HYPOTHESIS: This is an unprecedent reaction following injection of this copolymer. The presence of characteristics such as absence of infection, temporal relation between treatment and beginning of symptoms, and detection of epithelial hyperplasia at the local of injection reinforce the hypothesis of association of the substance and adverse reaction. In that patient, important complains motivated early investigation of urinary tract, that confirmed those aspects. Maybe if that reaction had occurred in patients with lower capacity of expression (such as in infants) it would be unnoticed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0446

  7 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521870
[Au] Autor:Curtis E; Fernandez R; Lee A
[Ad] Address:School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia.
[Ti] Title:The effect of topical medications on radial artery spasm in patients undergoing transradial coronary procedures: a systematic review.
[So] Source:JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep;16(3):738-751, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2202-4433
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of topical medications on radial artery spasm (RAS) in patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary procedures. INTRODUCTION: Percutaneous coronary procedures were traditionally carried out via the femoral artery; however, over the last 20 years there has been a global increase in the number of proceduralists carrying out percutaneous coronary procedures via the transradial approach. Radial artery spasm remains an issue for the transradial approach, potentially leading to procedural failure. Topical medications have been suggested to reduce the occurrence of RAS during transradial percutaneous coronary procedures. INCLUSION CRITERIA: This review considered papers that included participants aged 18 years and over undergoing non-emergency transradial percutaneous coronary procedures. This review considered papers on the utilization of topical medications prior to commencing the transradial approach for percutaneous coronary procedures to reduce RAS. Topical medications were compared to other medications. The primary outcome was the incidence of RAS as assessed by angiography or ultrasound or resistance felt by the operator while manipulating the catheter. Other outcomes of interest included change in radial artery diameter, measured by angiography or ultrasound, change in radial artery patency and side effects of medications administered. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials were considered. METHODS: A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. A search of various databases was carried out followed by a search for unpublished literature between 1989 to January 2017. Only papers published in English were included in the review. Papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). There was no need for a third reviewer. Quantitative data was extracted from papers included in the review using the JBI data extraction instrument and entered in to RevMan5 (Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Cochrane). All results were subject to double data entry. Effect sizes were expressed as odds ratio (for categorical data) and weighted mean differences (for continuous data) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated for analysis. RESULTS: Only three studies involving 697 participants met the inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of RAS in patients treated with a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics compared to subcutaneous lidocaine (OR 0.26; 95%CI 0.07,0.96). However there were no significant differences in RAS in studies that compared eutectic mixture of local anesthetics and placebo or a combinations of lidocaine with nitroglycerine compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: It is difficult to draw a valid conclusion, given the low number of studies, small sample sizes and heterogeneity between the studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11124/JBISRIR-2017-003358

  8 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519180
[Au] Autor:Abbas AM; Ali SS
[Ad] Address:a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Assiut University , Assiut , Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Intravenous lidocaine before caesarean section.
[So] Source:J Obstet Gynaecol;:1, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1364-6893
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/01443615.2017.1404016

  9 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29443696
[Au] Autor:Sin B; Cao J; Yang D; Ambert K; Punnapuzha S
[Ad] Address:Pharmacy Practice, LIU Pharmacy (Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy), The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY.
[Ti] Title:Intravenous Lidocaine for Intractable Renal Colic Unresponsive to Standard Therapy.
[So] Source:Am J Ther;, 2018 Jan 23.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3686
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CLINICAL FEATURES: Renal colic is defined as a flank pain radiating to the groin caused by kidney stones in the ureter (urolithiasis). Renal colic is a frequent cause of Emergency Department visits. Most renal colic cases present as acute distress and severe back and/or abdominal pain that require prompt treatment with analgesics. THERAPEUTIC CHALLENGE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids are traditionally used for renal colic in the Emergency Department. This trend of practice is based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Consensus guidelines that provide evidence-based approach for the management of renal colic are limited. One consensus guideline from Europe provides a systematic approach for the management of pain with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugss and opioids. However, no guidance is provided on how to manage patients who do not respond to these agents. SOLUTION: Intravenous lidocaine 120 mg in 100 mL normal saline was infused over 10 minutes for pain management for intractable renal colic unresponsive to standard therapy. Three minutes after initiation of lidocaine infusion, the patient reported numeric pain rating scale 1/10. At 5 minutes, the reported numeric pain rating scale was 0/10 and remained for 60 minutes after initiation of lidocaine infusion. No adverse events were reported during or after the infusion, and no subsequent analgesia was required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/MJT.0000000000000729

  10 / 29404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407363
[Au] Autor:Allen RH; Singh R
[Ad] Address:Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905. Electronic address: rhallen@wihri.org.
[Ti] Title:Society of Family Planning clinical guidelines pain control in surgical abortion part 1 - local anesthesia and minimal sedation.
[So] Source:Contraception;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0518
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Satisfactory pain control for women undergoing surgical abortion is important for patient comfort and satisfaction. Clinicians ought to be aware of the safety and efficacy of different pain control regimens. This document will focus on nonpharmacologic modalities to reduce pain and pharmacologic interventions up to the level of minimal sedation. For surgical abortion without intravenous medications, a multimodal approach to pain control may combine a dedicated emotional-support person, visual or auditory distraction, administration of local anesthesia to the cervix with buffered lidocaine and a preoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Oral opioids do not decrease procedural pain. Oral anxiolytics decrease anxiety but not the experience of pain. Further research is needed on alternative options to control pain short of moderate or deep sedation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


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