Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lingual and Nerve and Injuries [Words]
References found : 687 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 69 go to page                         

  1 / 687 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523381
[Au] Autor:Klazen Y; Van der Cruyssen F; Vranckx M; Van Vlierberghe M; Politis C; Renton T; Jacobs R
[Ad] Address:OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Iatrogenic trigeminal post-traumatic neuropathy: a retrospective two-year cohort study.
[So] Source:Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1399-0020
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:With the growing demand for dental work, trigeminal nerve injuries are increasingly common. This retrospective cohort study examined 53 cases of iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injury seen at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals of Leuven between 2013 and 2014 (0.6% among 8845 new patient visits). Patient records were screened for post-traumatic trigeminal nerve neuropathy caused by nerve injury incurred during implant surgery, endodontic treatment, local anaesthesia, tooth extraction, or specifically third molar removal. The patients ranged in age from 15 to 80years (mean age 42.1years) and 68% were female. The referral delay ranged from 1day to 6.5years (average 10months). The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was most frequently injured (28 cases), followed by the lingual nerve (LN) (21 cases). Most nerve injuries were caused during third molar removal (24 cases), followed by implant placement (nine cases) and local anaesthesia injuries (nine cases). Pain symptoms were experienced by 54% of patients suffering IAN injury, compared to 10% of patients with LN injury. Persistent neurosensory disturbances were identified in 60% of patients. While prevention remains the key issue, timely referral seems to be a critical factor for the successful treatment of post-traumatic neuropathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29329350
[Au] Autor:Su YK; Wang JH; Hsieh SY; Liu XZ; Lam CF; Huang SC
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital and Tzu Chi University School of Medicine, Hualien, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Incidence and risk factors for postoperative lingual neuropraxia following airway instrumentation: A retrospective matched case-control study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190589, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lingual nerve injury or neuropraxia is a rare but potentially serious perioperative complication following airway instrumentation during general anesthesia. This study explored the the incidence and perioperative risk factors for lingual nerve injury in patients receiving laryngeal mask (LMA) or endotracheal (ETGA) general anesthesia in a single center experience. METHODS AND RESULTS: All surgical patients in our hospital who received LMA or ETGA from 2009 to 2013 were included, and potential perioperative risk factors were compared. Matched controls were randomly selected (in 1:5 ratio) from the same database in non-case patients. A total of 36 patients in the records had reported experiencing tongue numbness after anesthesia in this study. Compared with the non-case surgical population (n = 54314), patients with tongue numbness were significantly younger (52.2±19.5 vs 42.0±14.5; P = 0.002) and reported lower ASA physical statuses (2.3±0.7 vs 1.6±0.6; P<0.001). Patient gender, anesthesia technique used, and airway device type (LMA or ETGA) did not differ significantly across the two groups. A significantly higher proportion of patients underwent operations of the head-and-neck region (38.9 vs 15.6%; P = 0.002) developed tongue numbness after anesthesia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that head-and-neck operations remained the most significant independent risk factor for postoperative lingual nerve injury (AOR 7.63; 95% CI 2.03-28.70). CONCLUSION: The overall incidence rate of postoperative lingual neuropraxy was 0.066% in patients receiving general anesthesia with airway device in place. Young and generally healthy patients receiving head-and-neck operation are at higher risk in developing postoperative lingual neuropraxy. Attention should be particularly exercised to reduce the pressure of endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask on the tongue during head-and-neck operation to avert the occurrence of postoperative lingual neuropraxy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Laryngeal Masks/adverse effects
Lingual Nerve Injuries/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190589

  3 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29303064
[Au] Autor:Elzahaby IA; Khater A; Abdallah A; Refky B; Abd Elaziz M; Shetiwy M; Zaid AM
[Ad] Address:1 Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Absence of Neck Scars With Total Endoscopic Submandibular Sialadenectomy Using a Chest Wall Approach: A New Technique.
[So] Source:Surg Innov;25(1):37-42, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1553-3514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: This study aims to demonstrate the safety, surgical feasibility, and esthetic features of total endoscopic submandibular sialadenectomy through a chest wall approach without the creation of any neck incisions. METHODS: Four patients with benign submandibular gland lesions underwent a total endoscopic submandibular sialadenectomy through a chest wall approach using 3 ports (one 10-mm port for the camera and two 5-mm ports for the working instruments). RESULTS: The operative time ranged from 140 to 170 minutes. Conversion to the open technique was only necessary in one case with good visualization of the facial vein and artery, marginal mandibular and lingual nerve. No significant perioperative complications were encountered. All patients were discharged on the third postoperative day, and they were satisfied with the cosmetic outcome. CONCLUSION: Total endoscopic submandibular sialadenectomy through a chest wall approach is technically feasible and safe with satisfactory cosmetic results. It may be a valid alternative to conventional surgery when performed in select patients. The absence of neck scars and the ability to avoid potential nerve injuries are the most obvious advantages of this innovative technique.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1553350617751460

  4 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29299188
[Au] Autor:La Monaca G; Vozza I; Giardino R; Annibali S; Pranno N; Cristalli MP
[Ad] Address:Department of Sense Organs, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Prevention of neurological injuries during mandibular third molar surgery: technical notes.
[So] Source:Ann Stomatol (Roma);8(2):45-52, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1824-0852
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Surgery to the mandibular third molar is common, and injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve and the lingual nerve are well-recognized complications of this procedure. The aim of these technical notes is to describe operative measures for reducing neurological complications during mandibular third molar surgery. The following procedure should be used to prevent damage to the inferior alveolar nerve: a well-designed mucoperiosteal flap, to obtain appropriate access to the surgical area; a conservative ostectomy on the distal and distal-lingual side; tooth sectioning, to facilitate its removal by decreasing the retention zones; tooth dislocation in the path of withdrawal imposed by the curvature of the root apex; and careful socket debridement, when the roots of the extracted tooth are in intimate contact with the mandibular canal. To prevent injury to the lingual nerve, it is important (I) to assess the integrity of the mandibular inner cortex and exclude the presence of fenestration, which could cause the dislocation of the tooth or its fragment into the sublingual or submandibular space; (II) to avoid inappropriate or excessive dislocation proceedings, in order to prevent lingual cortex fracture; (III) to perform horizontal mesial-distal crown sectioning of the lingually inclined tooth; (IV) to protect the lingual flap with a retractor showing the cortical ridge; and (V) to pass the suture not too apically and from the inner side in a buccal-lingual direction in the retromolar area.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180107
[Lr] Last revision date:180107
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11138/ads/2017.8.2.053

  5 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 27775478
[Au] Autor:Bahrami N; Sharma D; Rosenthal S; Davenport EM; Urban JE; Wagner B; Jung Y; Vaughan CG; Gioia GA; Stitzel JD; Whitlow CT; Maldjian JA
[Ad] Address:From the Advanced Neuroscience Imaging Research (ANSIR) Laboratory (N.B., D.S., E.M.D., Y.J., C.T.W., J.A.M.), Wake Forest School of Medicine (S.R.), Department of Radiology-Neuroradiology (Y.J., C.T.W.), Department of Biomedical Engineering (N.B., J.E.U., Y.J., J.D.S., C.T.W.), Department of Family
[Ti] Title:Subconcussive Head Impact Exposure and White Matter Tract Changes over a Single Season of Youth Football.
[So] Source:Radiology;281(3):919-926, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose To examine the effects of subconcussive impacts resulting from a single season of youth (age range, 8-13 years) football on changes in specific white matter (WM) tracts as detected with diffusion-tensor imaging in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussions. Materials and Methods Head impact data were recorded by using the Head Impact Telemetry system and quantified as the combined-probability risk-weighted cumulative exposure (RWE ). Twenty-five male participants were evaluated for seasonal fractional anisotropy (FA) changes in specific WM tracts: the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Fiber tracts were segmented into a central core and two fiber terminals. The relationship between seasonal FA change in the whole fiber, central core, and the fiber terminals with RWE was also investigated. Linear regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between RWE and change in fiber tract FA during the season. Results There were statistically significant linear relationships between RWE and decreased FA in the whole (R = 0.433; P = .003), core (R = 0.3649; P = .007), and terminals (R = 0.5666; P < .001) of left IFOF. A trend toward statistical significance (P = .08) in right SLF was observed. A statistically significant correlation between decrease in FA of the right SLF terminal and RWE was also observed (R = 0.2893; P = .028). Conclusion This study found a statistically significant relationship between head impact exposure and change of FA fractional anisotropy value of whole, core, and terminals of left IFOF and right SLF's terminals where WM and gray matter intersect, in the absence of a clinically diagnosed concussion. RSNA, 2016.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Concussion/pathology
Football/injuries
Head Injuries, Closed/pathology
White Matter/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Frontal Lobe/pathology
Humans
Male
Nerve Fibers, Myelinated/pathology
Neural Pathways/pathology
Occipital Lobe/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 171201
[Lr] Last revision date:171201
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29146720
[Au] Autor:Dessouky R; Xi Y; Zuniga J; Chhabra A
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Radiology (R.D., Y.X., A.C.).
[Ti] Title:Role of MR Neurography for the Diagnosis of Peripheral Trigeminal Nerve Injuries in Patients with Prior Molar Tooth Extraction.
[So] Source:AJNR Am J Neuroradiol;, 2017 Nov 16.
[Is] ISSN:1936-959X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Clinical neurosensory testing is an imperfect reference standard to evaluate molar tooth extraction related peripheral trigeminal neuropathy. The purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR neurography in this domain and correlation with neurosensory testing and surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, nerve caliber, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios were recorded by 2 observers using MR neurography for bilateral branches of the peripheral trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves. Patient demographics and correlation of the MR neurography findings with the Sunderland classification of nerve injury and intraoperative findings of surgical patients were obtained. RESULTS: Among 42 patients, the mean ± SD age for case and control patients were 35.8 ± 10.2 years and 43.2 ± 11.5 years, respectively, with male-to-female ratios of 1:1.4 and 1:5, respectively. Case subjects (peripheral trigeminal neuropathy or injury) had significantly larger differences in nerve thickness, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios than control patients for the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve ( = .01 and .0001, .012 and .005, and .01 and .01, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a significant association among differences in nerve thickness, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios and nerve injury (area under the curve, 0.83-0.84 for the inferior alveolar nerve and 0.77-0.78 for the lingual nerve). Interobserver agreement was good for the inferior alveolar nerve (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.70-0.79) and good to excellent for the lingual nerve (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.75-0.85). MR neurography correlations with respect to clinical neurosensory testing and surgical classifications were moderate to good. Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.68 and 0.81 and κ of 0.60 and 0.77 were observed for differences in nerve thickness. CONCLUSIONS: MR neurography can be reliably used for the diagnosis of injuries to the peripheral trigeminal nerve related to molar tooth extractions, with good to excellent correlation of imaging with clinical findings and surgical results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3174/ajnr.A5438

  7 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28834578
[Au] Autor:Mikuzuki L; Saito H; Katagiri A; Okada S; Sugawara S; Kubo A; Ohara K; Lee J; Toyofuku A; Iwata K
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 101-8310, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Phenotypic change in trigeminal ganglion neurons associated with satellite cell activation via extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation is involved in lingual neuropathic pain.
[So] Source:Eur J Neurosci;46(6):2190-2202, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9568
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injuries remain a common and complex clinical problem. Satellite glial cell (SGC) activation, associated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and neuropeptide expression in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) are known to be involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain related to trigeminal nerve injury. However, the involvement of these molecules in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lingual nerve crush (LNC) rats was observed in SGCs. To evaluate the role of neuron-SGC interactions under neuropathic pain, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (IR), phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2)-IR and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-IR cells in the TG were studied in LNC rats. The number of CGRP-IR neurons and neurons encircled with pERK1/2-IR SGCs was significantly larger in LNC rats compared with sham rats. The percentage of large-sized CGRP-IR neurons was significantly higher in LNC rats. The number of CGRP-IR neurons, neurons encircled with pERK1/2-IR SGCs, and neurons encircled with GFAP-IR SGCs was decreased following CGRP receptor blocker CGRP or mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1 inhibitor PD98059 administration into the TG after LNC. Reduced thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation to the tongue in LNC rats were also significantly recovered following CGRP or PD98059 administration. The present findings suggest that CGRP released from TG neurons activates SGCs through ERK1/2 phosphorylation and TG neuronal activity is enhanced, resulting in the tongue hypersensitivity associated with lingual nerve injury. The phenotypic switching of large myelinated TG neurons expressing CGRP may account for the pathogenesis of tongue neuropathic pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170918
[Lr] Last revision date:170918
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ejn.13667

  8 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28704637
[Au] Autor:Kung CY; Wang YM; Chan CP; Ju YR; Pan WL
[Ad] Address:Chief Resident, Department of Periodontics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the Mandibular Lingual Canal and Anterior Loop Length to Minimize Complications Associated With Anterior Mandibular Surgeries: A Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Study.
[So] Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg;75(10):2116.e1-2116.e13, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5053
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This retrospective study evaluated the localization, incidence, and dimensions of the mandibular lingual canal and the anterior loop in the Taiwanese population using the simulation and visual interpretation of cone-beam computed tomography to minimize complications during symphysis block surgical procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample population consisted of 215 patients (105 men and 110 women; mean age, 57 yr). The median lingual canal, symphysis bone thickness, and anterior loop length were defined and calculated using cone-beam computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructed images. The correlation of all data for men and women was assessed and analyzed statistically using unpaired t tests. RESULTS: All patients exhibited at least 1 median lingual canal in the symphysis, and the diameter of the main branch ranged from 0.21 to 1.48 mm (mean, 0.85 mm), with relevant differences between genders (longer in men than in women). A harvesting depth of 4 mm for the distance from the buccal bone to the terminal end of the median lingual canal resulted in a risk of neurovascular injury (13.0%); this risk was notably higher in women (19.1%) than in men (6.7%). The right and left anterior loop lengths ranged from 0 to 5.46 mm (mean, 2.60 mm) and from 0 to 5.57 mm (mean, 2.61 mm), respectively, with no relevant differences between genders or sides. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that routine cone-beam computed tomographic examinations before surgical interventions in the symphysis region are necessary because of the numerous complicated anatomic variations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control
Mandible/diagnostic imaging
Mandible/surgery
Mandibular Nerve/diagnostic imaging
Trigeminal Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Mandible/anatomy & histology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171012
[Lr] Last revision date:171012
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28523090
[Au] Autor:Choi KJ; Ryan MA; Cheng T; Powers D
[Ad] Address:Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Sciences, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
[Ti] Title:Penetrating Craniomaxillofacial Injury Caused by a Pneumatic Nail Gun.
[So] Source:Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr;10(2):159-161, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3875
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Craniomaxillofacial injuries can be complex, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. The primary survey is always the first step in trauma management prior to proceeding with further evaluation and treatment. A 26-year-old man presented with a penetrating nail gun injury through the oral and nasal cavities. He did not present in extremis but required elective endotracheal intubation for intraoperative assessment and treatment. Airway management was enhanced by the use of lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve blocks via the Vazirani-Akinosi technique to maintain spontaneous respiration while the tongue was distracted from the palate. The nail was removed and rapid sequence induction initiated for orotracheal intubation. Local nerve blocks can be an effective tool in the armamentarium of the craniomaxillofacial trauma surgeon in managing blunt and penetrating injuries. We demonstrate its utility in airway management when a penetrating foreign body in the upper airway precludes orotracheal or nasotracheal intubation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0036-1584405

  10 / 687 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28492423
[Au] Autor:Ucer C; Yilmaz Z; Scher E; Suzuki J; Renton T
[Ad] Address:*Professor, Department of Dental Implantology, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom. †Post-doctoral Research Assistant, Oral Surgery Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. ‡Professor in Oral Implantology, Department of Periodontology and Implantology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. §Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Department of Periodontology and Implantology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ¶Professor in Oral Surgery, Oral Surgery Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:A Survey of the Opinion and Experience of UK Dentists Part 3: An Evidence-Based Protocol of Surgical Risk Management Strategies in the Mandible.
[So] Source:Implant Dent;26(4):532-540, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2982
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Implant surgery in the mandible can cause serious complications that can be life threatening. The incidence and cause of iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injury (TNI) related to dental implant surgery was investigated in a survey of the opinion and experience of the UK dentists and reported by the authors in part 1 of this series of articles. Part 2 reported on the risk assessment and management of implant-related inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), mental nerve (MN), and lingual nerve (LN) injuries. This article evaluates the significance of these findings and recommends an evidence-based protocol of risk management strategies to reduce the risk of TNI related to dental implant surgery. METHODS: A survey was distributed among 405 dentists attending an Association of Dental Implantology (ADI) congress, of which 187 completed the survey. RESULTS: In this study, the strategies to manage the risk of TNI included unilateral staging of implant placement (57%) and identification the MN when placing implants (43%). Twelve percent used drill stops when operating in the mandible. Nineteen dentists used steroids (eg, dexamethasone) routinely preoperatively and postoperatively. Twenty-six dentists used basic cone beam computed tomography minimally invasive techniques, and 70% encountered a large anterior loop of the IAN. Most dentists (76%) allowed a 2- to 4-mm safety zone radiologically above the IAN when placing implants, and over half of the responders (56%) used implants that were 10 mm in length. CONCLUSION: Given the elective nature of implant surgery, TNI should be fully avoidable. The evidence suggest that TNI can be minimized with meticulous attention to accurate assessment and surgical planning as well as carrying out the surgery with a high degree of precision. In part 3 of their series of articles, the authors presented an evidence-based protocol that comprises preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative risk management strategies for dental implant surgical procedures in the mandible.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170721
[Lr] Last revision date:170721
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/ID.0000000000000602


page 1 of 69 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information