Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lip and Diseases [Words]
References found : 5520 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 552 go to page                         

  1 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 24022197
[Au] Autor:Hunter N; Kuznetsova IS; Labutina EV; Harrison JD
[Ad] Address:Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards (CRCE), Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ, UK.
[Ti] Title:Solid cancer incidence other than lung, liver and bone in Mayak workers: 1948-2004.
[So] Source:Br J Cancer;109(7):1989-96, 2013 Oct 1.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1827
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cancer incidence in the Mayak Production Association (PA) cohort was analysed to investigate for the first time whether external gamma-ray and internal plutonium exposure are associated with raised incidence of solid cancers other than lung, liver and bone (other solid cancers). METHODS: The cohort includes 22,366 workers of both sexes who were first employed between 1948 and 1982. A total of 1447 cases of other solid cancers were registered in the follow-up period until 2004. The Poisson regression was used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative exposure to plutonium and external gamma-ray. RESULTS: A weak association was found between cumulative exposure to external gamma-ray and the incidence of other solid cancers (ERR/Gy=0.07; 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.01-0.15), but this association lost its significance after adjusting for internal plutonium exposure. There was no indication of any association with plutonium exposure for other solid cancers. Among 16 individual cancer sites, there was a statistically significant association with external exposure for lip cancer (ERR/Gy=1.74; 95% CI: 0.37; 6.71) and with plutonium exposure for pancreatic cancer (ERR/Gy=1.58; 95% CI; 0.17; 4.77). CONCLUSION: This study of Mayak workers does not provide evidence of an increased risk of other solid cancers. The observed increase in the risk of cancer of the lip and pancreas should be treated with caution because of the limited amount of relevant data and because the observations may be simply due to chance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gamma Rays/adverse effects
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced/epidemiology
Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Nuclear Weapons
Questionnaires
Russia/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:53023GN24M (Plutonium)
[Em] Entry month:1312
[Cu] Class update date: 141009
[Lr] Last revision date:141009
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131002
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/bjc.2013.543

  2 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24102903
[Au] Autor:Marquezin MC; Gavião MB; Alonso MB; Ramirez-Sotelo LR; Haiter-Neto F; Castelo PM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Relationship between orofacial function, dentofacial morphology, and bite force in young subjects.
[So] Source:Oral Dis;20(6):567-73, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1601-0825
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the relationship between orofacial function, dentofacial morphology, and bite force in young subjects. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Three hundred and sixteen subjects were divided according to dentition stage (early, intermediate, and late mixed and permanent dentition). Orofacial function was screened using the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S). Orthodontic treatment need, bite force, lateral and frontal craniofacial dimensions and presence of sleep bruxism were also assessed. The results were submitted to descriptive statistics, normality and correlation tests, analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression to test the relationship between NOT-S scores and the studied independent variables. RESULTS: The variance of NOT-S scores between groups was not significant. The evaluation of the variables that significantly contributed to NOT-S scores variation showed that age and presence of bruxism related to higher NOT-S total scores, while the increase in overbite measurement and presence of closed lip posture related to lower scores. Bite force did not show a significant relationship with scores of orofacial dysfunction. No significant correlations between craniofacial dimensions and NOT-S scores were observed. CONCLUSION: Age and sleep bruxism were related to higher NOT-S scores, while the increase in overbite measurement and closed lip posture contributed to lower scores of orofacial dysfunction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:D
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/odi.12174

  3 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 24489909
[Au] Autor:Musharraf A; Kruspe D; Tomasch J; Besenbeck B; Englert C; Landgraf K
[Ad] Address:Leibniz Institute for Age Research - Fritz Lipmann Institute e. V. (FLI), Jena, Germany....
[Ti] Title:BOR-syndrome-associated Eya1 mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of Eya1 protein.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(1):e87407, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mutations in the human EYA1 gene have been associated with several human diseases including branchio-oto (BO) and branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome, as well as congenital cataracts and ocular anterior segment anomalies. BOR patients suffer from severe malformations of the ears, branchial arches and kidneys. The phenotype of Eya1-heterozygous mice resembles the symptoms of human patients suffering from BOR syndrome. The Eya1 gene encodes a multifunctional protein that acts as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and a transcriptional coactivator. It has been shown that Eya1 interacts with Six transcription factors, which are also required for nuclear translocation of the Eya1 protein. We investigated the effects of seven disease-causing Eya1 missense mutations on Eya1 protein function, in particular cellular localization, ability to interact with Six proteins, and protein stability. We show here that the BOR-associated Eya1 missense mutations S454P, L472R, and L550P lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of the Eya1 protein in mammalian cells. Moreover, Six proteins lead to a significant stabilization of Eya1, which is caused by Six-mediated protection from proteasomal degradation. In case of the mutant L550P, loss of interaction with Six proteins leads to rapid protein degradation. Our observations suggest that protein destabilization constitutes a novel disease causing mechanism for Eya1.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Branchio-Oto-Renal Syndrome/genetics
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics
Nuclear Proteins/genetics
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
COS Cells
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Nucleus/metabolism
Cercopithecus aethiops
Homeodomain Proteins/metabolism
Humans
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism
Mice
Mutation, Missense
Nuclear Proteins/metabolism
Protein Binding
Protein Stability
Protein Transport
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/metabolism
Proteolysis
Ubiquitination
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Homeodomain Proteins); 0 (Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); EC 3.1.3.48 (Eya1 protein, mouse); EC 3.1.3.48 (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases); EC 3.4.25.1 (Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0087407

  4 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24008546
[Au] Autor:Leung M; Leung L; Fung D; Poon WL; Liu C; Chung K; Tang P; Tse S; Fan TW; Chao N; Liu K
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong....
[Ti] Title:Management of the low-flow head and neck vascular malformations in children: the sclerotherapy protocol.
[So] Source:Eur J Pediatr Surg;24(1):97-101, 2014 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1439-359X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: Image-guided sclerotherapy is becoming the preferred treatment for low-flow vascular malformations in head and neck region. The authors review the management protocol for this condition and evaluate its clinical outcomes. METHODS: Children with low-flow vascular malformations in head and neck region undergoing sclerotherapy from 2010 to 2013 were reviewed. All patients were assessed by pediatric surgeons and interventional radiologists in the multidisciplinary vascular anomalies clinic. Ultrasonography and intravenous contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were performed preoperatively. Under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, sclerotherapy were performed with ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Sodium tetradecryl sulfate (STS) foam or ethanolamine was used for venous malformation and doxycycline for lymphatic malformations as primary sclerosants, whereas 98% ethanol was reserved as an adjuvant sclerosant in selected cases of repeated procedures. Perioperative dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg thrice daily was administered to decrease postsclerotherapy swelling and single dose intravenous mannitol 0.5 g/kg was given to minimize thromboembolic complications. Postoperatively, patients were admitted to intensive care unit for mechanical ventilation under deep sedation for airway protection. RESULTS: Overall 13 children (8 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 25 months (range, 2 mo-11 y) underwent a total of 25 sessions of image-guided staged sclerotherapy. There were five venous and eight lymphatic malformations. Location wise there were eight cervical, one lingual, one parotid, one lip, one facial, and one palatal lesions. Six patients had obstructive airway symptoms. Five patients required staged sclerotherapies from two to six sessions. There were no airway and thromboembolic complications. One patient had bleeding while another had recurrent swelling following sclerotherapy for lymphatic malformations and they were treated by aspiration. Significant size reductions of more than 50% volume were achieved in all patients. All patients with obstructive symptoms showed improvement. CONCLUSION: Sclerotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for head and neck vascular malformations in children. Routine perioperative protocol is essential to reduce airway and thromboembolic complications. Size reduction and functional improvement occurred in all patients undergoing sclerotherapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fluoroscopy/methods
Lymphatic Abnormalities/therapy
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/therapy
Sclerotherapy/methods
Ultrasonography, Interventional/methods
Vascular Malformations/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Airway Obstruction/diagnosis
Airway Obstruction/therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Lymphatic Abnormalities/diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Male
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/diagnosis
Recurrence
Retreatment
Retrospective Studies
Ultrasonography
Vascular Malformations/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0033-1354585

  5 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25219029
[Au] Autor:Omura Y; Jones MK; Duvvi H; Shimotsuura Y; Ohki M; Rodriques A
[Ti] Title:Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.
[So] Source:Acupunct Electrother Res;39(2):135-67, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0360-1293
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective treatment of heart disease & cancer were also presented. Significant beneficial effect of optimal dose of Vitamin D3 400 I.U. for average adult on heart, brain and cancer, and harmful effect of widely used 2000 I.U., was emphasized.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis
Troponin I/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Eyebrows/anatomy & histology
Face/anatomy & histology
Female
Hand/anatomy & histology
Humans
Lip/anatomy & histology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardium/metabolism
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Troponin I)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140915
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 24770526
[Au] Autor:Tonolli VM; Stolf HO; Tonello CS; Pires RB; Abbade LP
[Ad] Address:"Júlio de Mesquita Filho" Paulista State University, Botucatu, SP, Brasil....
[Ti] Title:Syndrome in question. Hay-Wells syndrome.
[So] Source:An Bras Dermatol;89(2):363-4, 2014 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1806-4841
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hay-Wells syndrome or AEC (Ankyloblepharon, Ectodermal dysplasia and Cleft lip and palate syndrome) is a rare ectodermal disorder. The treatment is aimed to prevent clinical complications. We describe the case of a four-month old male patient with erosions on the scalp, trunk and arms, trachyonychia, deformity of the ears, micropenis, cleft palate, decreased eyebrow and eyelash hairs, in addition to antecedents of surgical correction of ankyloblepharon. The importance of the correct diagnosis is emphasized, besides the investigation of the associated diseases, treatment of complications and genetic counseling of the parents.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cleft Lip/pathology
Cleft Palate/pathology
Ectodermal Dysplasia/pathology
Epidermolysis Bullosa/pathology
Eye Abnormalities/pathology
Eyelids/abnormalities
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abnormalities, Multiple
Biopsy
Eyelids/pathology
Humans
Infant
Male
Scalp/pathology
Skin/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140428
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24468403
[Au] Autor:Liu M; Li M; Sun S; Li B; Du D; Sun J; Cao F; Li H; Jia F; Wang T; Chang N; Yu H; Wang Q; Peng H
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutics, Daqing Campus of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319, China....
[Ti] Title:The use of antibody modified liposomes loaded with AMO-1 to deliver oligonucleotides to ischemic myocardium for arrhythmia therapy.
[So] Source:Biomaterials;35(11):3697-707, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5905
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:MicroRNA-1 (miR-1) has been found in cardiac and skeletal tissues. It is overexpressed in ischemic cardiac tissues. Down-regulation of miR-1 could relieve arrhythmogenesis by the anti-miR-1 antisense oligonucleotides (AMO-1). To increase the therapeutic efficiency and inhibit off-target effects of AMO-1, here we explored anti-cardiac troponin I (cTnI) antibody modified liposomes loading with AMO-1 (cT-A-LIP) to deliver the oligonucleotides to ischemic myocardium tissues. Liposomal cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. The targeting abilities to foci were evaluated by in vivo imaging. The uptake and bio-distribution in vitro were observed by live cell station and flow cytometry, respectively. The anti-arrhythmic effects of cT-A-LIP in vivo were evaluated by electrocardiograms (ECG), immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and patch-clamp recording. Immunohistochemistry showed that cTnI expression had a peak at the third day after myocardial infarction (MI). After cT-LIP administration via tail vein, accumulation of fluorescent trackers in the ischemic foci was significantly increased more than that of LIP. In addition, after cT-A-LIP administration, the ischemic arrhythmias were recovered and ST segment in ECG was elevated nearly back to normal. Compared with MI group, miR-1 expression was significantly down-regulated while Kir2.1 and CX43 protein expression were increased. Patch-clamp recordings showed that cT-A-LIP as well as AMO-1 incubation increased K(+) current density in guinea pigs ventricular cardiomyocytes acting on repolarized membrane potential. In conclusion, the cT-A-LIP not only delivered AMO-1 to ischemic myocardium in MI rats, but validated AMO-1 on relieving ischemic arrhythmia by silencing of miR-1 in ischemic myocardium and restoring the depolarized resting membrane potential (RMP) in MI rats.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies/metabolism
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/complications
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy
Liposomes/chemistry
Myocardial Ischemia/complications
Myocardial Ischemia/therapy
Oligonucleotides, Antisense/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/pathology
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/ultrasonography
Cell Survival/drug effects
Flow Cytometry
Liposomes/ultrastructure
MicroRNAs/metabolism
Myocardial Ischemia/pathology
Myocardial Ischemia/ultrasonography
Myocardium/pathology
Particle Size
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Static Electricity
Time Factors
Time-Lapse Imaging
Troponin I/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies); 0 (Liposomes); 0 (MIRN1 microRNA, rat); 0 (MicroRNAs); 0 (Oligonucleotides, Antisense); 0 (Troponin I)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 24413427
[Au] Autor:Weber P; Corrêa EC; Bolzan Gde P; Ferreira Fdos S; Soares JC; Silva AM
[Ti] Title:Chewing and swallowing in young women with temporomandibular disorder.
[So] Source:Codas;25(4):375-80, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng; por
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate chewing and swallowing functions in women with and without temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and investigate the position of the mandible and the hyoid bone as they are important structures in the development of these functions. METHODS: Seventy women were evaluated in relation to TMD diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria, among them, 34 composed the study group (SG) with TMD and 36 took part in the control group (CG). Evaluation of the masticatory and swallowing functions was performed according to the Protocol of Orofacial Myofunctional Evaluation with Scores. Mandibular and hyoid bone position variables were measured by cephalometric analysis. RESULTS: TMD subjects showed a significant difference on tongue (p=0.03) and lip (p=0.04) posture during swallowing function, and a more frequent adoption of a chronic unilateral chewing pattern as well (p=0.03). Moreover, they presented a lower position of the hyoid bone in relation to the mandible (p=0,00). CONCLUSION: TMD presence resulted on a higher frequency of myofunctional alterations during masticatory and swallowing functions. A greater distance from hyoid bone to the mandible in addition with the presence of painful symptom can justify, partly, the atypical behaviors of the tongue and lips observed on TMD group. The TMD repercussion on alimentaires functions in a young age group justifies the importance of an earlier diagnosis and therapeutic intervention in these individuals.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deglutition/physiology
Hyoid Bone/physiopathology
Mandible/physiopathology
Mastication/physiology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cephalometry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140113
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 20815731
[Au] Autor:Ayoub A; Bell A; Simmons D; Bowman A; Brown D; Lo TW; Xiao Y
[Ti] Title:3D assessment of lip scarring and residual dysmorphology following surgical repair of cleft lip and palate: a preliminary study.
[So] Source:Cleft Palate Craniofac J;48(4):379-87, 2011 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate lip scarring and the three-dimensional (3D) lip morphology following primary reconstruction in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) relative to contemporaneous noncleft data. DESIGN: Retrospective, cross-sectional, controlled study. SETTING: Glasgow Dental Hospital and School, University of Glasgow, U.K. PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS: Three groups of 10-year-old children: 51 with UCLP, 43 UCL (unilateral cleft lip), and 68 controls. METHODS: Three-dimensional images of the face were recorded using stereo cameras on a two-pod capture station, and 3D coordinates of anthropometric landmarks were extracted from the facial images. A novel method was applied to quantify residual scarring and the associated lip dysmorphologies. The relationships among outcome measures were investigated. RESULTS: Residual lip dysmorphologies were more pronounced in UCLP cases. The width of the Cupid's bow was increased due to lateral displacement of the christa philteri left (cphL) in both UCL and UCLP patients. In the upper part of the lip, the nostril base was significantly wider in UCLP cases when compared with UCL cases and controls. Scar redness was more pronounced in UCL than in UCLP cases. No relationship could be identified between lip scarring and other measurements of lip dysmorphology. CONCLUSIONS: Stereophotogrammetry, together with associated image analysis, allow early detection of residual dysmorphology following cleft repair.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cicatrix/pathology
Cleft Lip/surgery
Cleft Palate/surgery
Lip Diseases/pathology
Postoperative Complications/pathology
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anatomic Landmarks/pathology
Child
Cicatrix/etiology
Color
Cross-Sectional Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional/methods
Lip/pathology
Lip Diseases/etiology
Nasal Cartilages/pathology
Photogrammetry/methods
Principal Component Analysis
Retrospective Studies
User-Computer Interface
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110715
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1597/10-057

  10 / 5520 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 20815726
[Au] Autor:Narinesingh SP; Whitby DJ; Davenport PJ
[Ti] Title:Moraxella catarrhalis: an unrecognized pathogen of the oral cavity?
[So] Source:Cleft Palate Craniofac J;48(4):462-4, 2011 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of the bacterial flora of the nose and throat on the outcome of the initial repairs of the cleft palate in the presence of prophylactic antibiotics. DESIGN: A retrospective review of 90 procedures in 66 patients who had cleft palate repair between April 2005 and June 2007 was conducted at Booth Hall Children's Hospital, Manchester, U.K. Both isolated cleft palate and cleft lip and palate patients were included. Exclusion criteria included syndromic cases, other medical disorders, and revisions of previous cleft palate repairs. Nose and throat swabs were taken on admission. Benzyl penicillin and flucloxacillin were given perioperatively. The occurrence of oronasal fistulas was correlated with the bacteria grown on culture. RESULTS: The oronasal fistula rate was 15.9%. The highest fistula rate in procedures with positive swabs was seen with Moraxella catarrhalis. CONCLUSIONS: M. catarrhalis has not been previously recognized as a pathogen in cleft palate repairs. This study demonstrates a higher fistula rate in procedures positive for M. catarrhalis. Other factors that may have contributed to the fistula formation include the severity of the initial cleft and technical factors. Further study is required before a definitive link can be established.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cleft Lip/surgery
Cleft Palate/surgery
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis/isolation & purification
Moraxellaceae Infections/diagnosis
Nose/microbiology
Pharynx/microbiology
Postoperative Complications/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Floxacillin/therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Nose Diseases/microbiology
Oral Fistula/microbiology
Penicillin G/therapeutic use
Respiratory Tract Fistula/microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification
Streptococcus/isolation & purification
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 43B2M34G2V (Floxacillin); Q42T66VG0C (Penicillin G)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110715
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1597/09-054


page 1 of 552 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information