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[PMID]: 27790574
[Au] Autor:Veerabhadrappa SK; Chandrappa PR; Patil S; Roodmal SY; Kumarswamy A; Chappi MK
[Ad] Address:Lecturer, SEGi University , No. 9, Jalan Teknologi, Taman Sains, Petaling Jaya, Kota Damansara, Selangor - 47810, Malaysia .
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of Xerostomia in Different Psychological Disorders: An Observational Study.
[So] Source:J Clin Diagn Res;10(9):ZC24-ZC27, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2249-782X
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Psychiatric diseases like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are increasing at an alarming rate. These diseases can affect the quantity and quality of saliva leading to multiple oral diseases. Although many researchers have evaluated xerostomia in general population, its prevalence is not been assessed in patients suffering from different psychological disorders. AIM: To investigate the prevalence of xerostomia and to assess the correlation between xerostomia and dryness of lip and mucosa in different psychological disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted over a period of six months in Department of Psychiatry and Department of Oral Medicine. Patients with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as diagnosed by an experienced psychiatrist, were given a questionnaire to evaluate the xerostomia. Patients with symptoms of xerostomia were subjected to oral examination by a skilled oral diagnostician to check for dryness of lips and mucosa. One hundred patients from each group of psychiatric diseases were included in the study using a consecutive sampling technique. An equal number of healthy individuals reporting to oral medicine department for routine oral screening were included as control group after initial psychiatric evaluation. RESULTS: In this study statistically significant increase in the xerostomia in psychiatric patients was recorded when compared to the control group (p<0.01). Xerostomia was significantly higher in anxiety patients (51%) followed by depression (47%), bipolar disorder (41%), schizophrenia (39%) and control group (27%). The majority of the psychiatric patients had 'moderate' to 'severe' xerostomia whereas the control group had 'mild' xerostomia. Xerostomia was significantly higher in younger age group (18-49 years) than in older age group and females patients had higher xerostomia than male patients. Psychiatric patients had significantly more dryness of lip and mucosa than healthy controls. A moderate to strong spearman correlation (r=0.72) was observed between xerostomia and psychological alterations. CONCLUSION: A positive association was established between psychological alterations and xerostomia and dryness of lip and mucosa. Emotional alterations may act as a precipitating factor that could influence the salivary secretion resulting in multiple oral diseases. Psychiatrists can screen for xerostomia and collaborate with dentists for comprehensive management of xerostomia in psychiatric patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161030
[Lr] Last revision date:161030
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26741500
[Au] Autor:Gupta N; Wikenheiser-Brokamp KA; Fischer A; McCormack FX
[Ad] Address:1 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, and.
[Ti] Title:Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease as the Presenting Manifestation of Sjögren Syndrome.
[So] Source:Ann Am Thorac Soc;13(3):371-5, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2325-6621
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:Interstitial lung diseases, especially lymphoproliferative disorders such as follicular bronchiolitis and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, are commonly seen in association with Sjögren syndrome. Although the predominant computed tomographic (CT) findings in patients with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis include poorly defined centrilobular nodules and ground-glass attenuation, cystic changes can be seen in approximately two-thirds of these patients. The objective of this study was to define the clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of cyst-predominant lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis in patients with Sjögren syndrome. We present four patients who were referred to our institution with diffuse cystic changes on chest CT imaging. All four had a presumptive diagnosis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis but were subsequently found to have Sjögren syndrome. The diagnosis was established based on the clinical symptoms of xerostomia and xerophthalmia along with serologic detection of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA)/Ro antibodies, and anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB)/La antibodies. The cystic pattern associated with Sjögren syndrome had a characteristic appearance on chest CT images. Typical features included a wide variation in cyst size, internal structure within cysts, geographic simplification of parenchymal architecture producing a "dissolving lung appearance," perivascular and often basilar-predominant distribution, and frequent association with ground-glass opacities and nodules. In a compatible clinical context, we submit that these findings can be sufficiently distinctive to obviate the need for lung biopsy, even in the absence of confirmatory serological studies or lip biopsy. Clinicians should consider occult Sjögren syndrome in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with idiopathic diffuse cystic lung disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:0163
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1513/AnnalsATS.201511-759BC

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[PMID]: 26471230
[Au] Autor:Ryan KM; Ellis AR; Raafat R; Bhoj EJ; Hakonarson H; Li D; Schrier Vergano S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia.
[Ti] Title:Aortic coarctation and carotid artery aneurysm in a patient with Hardikar syndrome: Cardiovascular implications for affected individuals.
[So] Source:Am J Med Genet A;170A(2):482-6, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:Hardikar syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome first characterized in 1992 by Hardikar et al. to describe two individuals with cholestasis, cleft lip/palate, retinal pigmentation, intestinal abnormalities, and genitourinary anomalies. Between 1992 and 2002, four individuals with Hardikar syndrome were reported in the literature. The fourth individual [Maluf et al. (2002), Transplantation 74:1058-1061; Poley and Proud (2008) Am J Med Genet Part A 146A:2473-2479], who had progressive cholestatic liver disease ultimately requiring liver transplantation, has continued to be followed at our institution. Recently, at the age of 14 years, during an evaluation for refractory hypertension, she was found to have developed coarctation of the aorta that was treated with aortic angioplasty and stenting, dramatically improving her hypertension. Further vascular investigation also revealed a small aneurysm of her carotid artery requiring neurosurgical evaluation and anticoagulant therapy. To our knowledge, these vascular anomalies have not been reported in Hardikar syndrome and the high association of congenital heart disease in the individuals with Hardikar syndrome has not been further addressed. Herein, we discuss this additional clinical information, speculate briefly on possible molecular etiologies, and discuss potential cardiac surveillance recommendations. We hope that broadening the known phenotype of this very rare disorder will further aid clinicians in their management and surveillance for these individuals.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aneurysm/etiology
Aortic Coarctation/etiology
Carotid Artery Diseases/etiology
Cholestasis/complications
Cleft Palate/complications
Retinitis Pigmentosa/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aneurysm/pathology
Aortic Coarctation/pathology
Carotid Artery Diseases/pathology
Cholestasis/pathology
Cleft Palate/pathology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prognosis
Retinitis Pigmentosa/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161026
[Lr] Last revision date:161026
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:016125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajmg.a.37438

  4 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26408908
[Au] Autor:Lena AM; Duca S; Novelli F; Melino S; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli M; Melino G; Candi E
[Ad] Address:Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Amino-terminal residues of ΔNp63, mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, are required for its transcriptional activity.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;467(2):434-40, 2015 Nov 13.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:p63, a member of the p53 family, is a crucial transcription factor for epithelial development and skin homeostasis. Heterozygous mutations in TP63 gene have been associated with human ectodermal dysplasia disorders. Most of these TP63 mutations are missense mutations causing amino acidic substitutions at p63 DNA binding or SAM domains that reduce or abolish the transcriptional activity of mutants p63. A significant number of mutants, however, resides in part of the p63 protein that apparently do not affect DNA binding and/or transcriptional activity, such as the N-terminal domain. Here, we characterize five p63 mutations at the 5' end of TP63 gene aiming to understand the pathogenesis of the diseases and to uncover the role of ΔNp63α N-terminus residues in determining its transactivation potential.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amino Acid Sequence
Sequence Deletion
Transcription Factors/genetics
Transcriptional Activation
Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Binding Sites
Carrier Proteins/genetics
Carrier Proteins/metabolism
Cell Line, Tumor
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21/genetics
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21/metabolism
Cytoskeletal Proteins/genetics
Cytoskeletal Proteins/metabolism
Ectodermal Dysplasia/genetics
Ectodermal Dysplasia/metabolism
Ectodermal Dysplasia/pathology
Genes, Reporter
HEK293 Cells
Humans
Keratin-14/genetics
Keratin-14/metabolism
Luciferases/genetics
Luciferases/metabolism
Membrane Proteins/genetics
Membrane Proteins/metabolism
Molecular Sequence Data
Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics
Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism
Open Reading Frames
Protein Binding
Protein Precursors/genetics
Protein Precursors/metabolism
Protein Structure, Tertiary
Recombinant Proteins/genetics
Recombinant Proteins/metabolism
Response Elements
Transcription Factors/chemistry
Transcription Factors/metabolism
Tumor Suppressor Proteins/chemistry
Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carrier Proteins); 0 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21); 0 (Cytoskeletal Proteins); 0 (DST protein, human); 0 (KRT14 protein, human); 0 (Keratin-14); 0 (Membrane Proteins); 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins); 0 (Protein Precursors); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 0 (TP63 protein, human); 0 (Transcription Factors); 0 (Tumor Suppressor Proteins); 0 (ZNF750 protein, human); 0 (envoplakin); EC 1.13.12.- (Luciferases)
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151020
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26406559
[Au] Autor:de Almeida AL; Catalani DT; Garcia de Oliveira PC; Soares S; Tunes FS; Neppelenbroek KH
[Ti] Title:Assessment of Periodontal and Hygiene Conditions of Removable Partial Dentures in Individuals With Clefts.
[So] Source:Cleft Palate Craniofac J;53(6):727-731, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess hygiene conditions in removable partial dentures (RPDs) and to compare the periodontal status between abutment and nonabutment teeth in clefts patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTINGS: Tertiary referral hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five patients of both genders, aged 20 to 75 years, who were upper RPD wearers for at least 2 years, with cleft lip, alveolus, and/or palate who attended follow-up appointments between 2010 and 2012. INTERVENTIONS: The clinical periodontal parameters assessed on abutment teeth (experimental group) and nonabutment teeth (control group) were probing depth, clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index, and gingival index (GI). The RPDs were evaluated under the following parameters: hygiene conditions and type of clasp on abutment. Both groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn's statistical test. Statistical significance was set at P < .05. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-six abutment teeth and 168 nonabutment teeth were evaluated in 45 patients. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups for the CAL parameter (P = .03). With regard to the prostheses' hygiene conditions through the Tarbet index parameter, of the 186 quadrants evaluated, 143 scored 2 and 3. Ackers' clasps were the most frequent clasps (n = 111). A statistically significant difference was found for the GI parameter (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to conclude, in this cross-sectional study, that in general terms, the use of RPDs did not interfere in the periodontal conditions of abutment teeth; however, most prostheses presented poor hygiene and high quantity of dental plaque.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:0167
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25836419
[Au] Autor:Santambrogio P; Dusi S; Guaraldo M; Rotundo LI; Broccoli V; Garavaglia B; Tiranti V; Levi S
[Ad] Address:San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Division of Neuroscience, 20132 Milano, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Mitochondrial iron and energetic dysfunction distinguish fibroblasts and induced neurons from pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration patients.
[So] Source:Neurobiol Dis;81:144-53, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1095-953X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is an early onset autosomal recessive movement disorder caused by mutation of the pantothenate kinase-2 gene, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme involved in coenzyme A synthesis. The disorder is characterised by high iron levels in the brain, although the pathological mechanism leading to this accumulation is unknown. To address this question, we tested primary skin fibroblasts from three patients and three healthy subjects, as well as neurons induced by direct fibroblast reprogramming, for oxidative status, mitochondrial functionality and iron parameters. The patients' fibroblasts showed altered oxidative status, reduced antioxidant defence, and impaired cytosolic and mitochondrial aconitase activities compared to control cells. Mitochondrial iron homeostasis and functionality analysis of patient fibroblasts indicated increased labile iron pool content and reactive oxygen species development, altered mitochondrial shape, decreased membrane potential and reduced ATP levels. Furthermore, analysis of induced neurons, performed at a single cell level, confirmed some of the results obtained in fibroblasts, indicating an altered oxidative status and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly due to iron mishandling. Thus, for the first time, altered biological processes have been identified in vitro in live diseased neurons. Moreover, the obtained induced neurons can be considered a suitable human neuronal model for the identification of candidate therapeutic compounds for this disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Energy Metabolism/physiology
Fibroblasts/ultrastructure
Iron/metabolism
Mitochondria/metabolism
Neurodegenerative Diseases/pathology
Neurons/ultrastructure
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aconitate Hydratase/metabolism
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cells, Cultured
Fibroblasts/pathology
Glutathione/metabolism
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lip/metabolism
Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/physiology
Mitochondria/pathology
Mitochondria/ultrastructure
Mutation
Neurodegenerative Diseases/enzymology
Neurodegenerative Diseases/genetics
Neurons/pathology
Oxidation-Reduction
Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor)/genetics
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 8L70Q75FXE (Adenosine Triphosphate); E1UOL152H7 (Iron); EC 2.7.1.- (Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor)); EC 2.7.1.33 (pantothenate kinase); EC 4.2.1.3 (Aconitate Hydratase); GAN16C9B8O (Glutathione)
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:015116
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23125954
[Au] Autor:Gutsche M; Rosen GD; Swigris JJ
[Ad] Address:Interstitial Lung Disease Program, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
[Ti] Title:Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review.
[So] Source:Curr Respir Care Rep;1:224-232, 2012 Sep 21.
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), poly-/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and undifferentiated (UCTD) as well as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) can all be associated with the development of ILD. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is the most commonly observed histopathological pattern in CTD-ILD, but other patterns including usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) may occur. Although the majority of patients with CTD-ILD experience stable or slowly advancing ILD, a small yet significant group exhibits a more severe and progressive course. Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatments have been conducted only in SSc-associated ILD. However, clinical experience suggests that a handful of immunosuppressive medications are potentially effective in a sizeable portion of patients with ILD caused by other CTDs. In this manuscript, we review the clinical characteristics and management of the most common CTD-ILDs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:0121
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26759679
[Au] Autor:Wagner JG; Bench EM; Plantmason L
[Ad] Address:Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles County + University of Southern California (LAC+USC), Department of Emergency Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
[Ti] Title:An Unusual Case of Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitor-Related Penile Angioedema with Evolution to the Oropharynx.
[So] Source:West J Emerg Med;16(7):1185-7, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1936-9018
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:A 52-year-old African American male with a long history of poorly controlled hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED) with two days of genital edema and pain. During ED work-up, the patient developed sudden onset of non-pitting, non-pruritic, and non-urticarial upper lip edema. Review of his antihypertensive medication list revealed that he normally took benazepril, highly suggestive of a diagnosis of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor-related angioedema (ACEI-RA). We present the first reported case of penile ACEI-RA that progressed to involve the oropharynx. The ED management of the condition and some of the newer treatment options available for ACEI-RA is also briefly discussed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angioedema/chemically induced
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects
Benzazepines/adverse effects
Oropharynx/drug effects
Penile Diseases/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alcoholism/complications
Humans
Lip/drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Penis/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Benzazepines); UDM7Q7QWP8 (benazepril)
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161022
[Lr] Last revision date:161022
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:016113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5811/westjem.2015.8.28061

  9 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27761567
[Au] Autor:Demir FT; Salaeva K; Altunay IK; Yalcin O
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. E-mail. filizsvet@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:An extraordinary case of syphilis presenting with a labial ulcer.
[So] Source:Saudi Med J;37(11):1261-1264, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0379-5284
[Cp] Country of publication:Saudi Arabia
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:In the differential diagnosis of patients with ulcers on the lips characteristics like the duration of the ulcer, number, size, depth, shape, base, margins, and distribution are considered. Such ulcers arise from many diseases particularly, viral and bacterial infections, malignancies can also be responsible. Classic syphilitic chancres are painless erosions settled on hard papule; these are evident in the genital area in more than 90% of patients. This study describes a case of a 38-year-old female patient presenting with a painful ulcer covering 3 quarters of the upper lip showing settlement on erythematous, edematous, and indurated plaque covered with hemorrhagic crusts. The aim of this study was to consider differences between the classic syphilitic chancre typically found in the genital region from extragenital chancres and to raise awareness of the possibility of primary syphilis when patients present with painful ulcers on the lip.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161021
[Lr] Last revision date:161021
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.15537/smj.2016.11.15674

  10 / 5456 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27759902
[Au] Autor:Pilati SF; Bianco BC; Vieira DS; Modolo F
[Ad] Address:Odontology, Health Sciences Center, Vale do Itajaí University.
[Ti] Title:Histopathologic features in actinic cheilitis by the comparison of grading dysplasia systems.
[So] Source:Oral Dis;, 2016 Oct 19.
[Is] ISSN:1601-0825
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:ENG
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the histopathological findings in actinic cheilitis (AC) and lip squamous cell carcinomas (LSCC) diagnosed at Federal University of Santa Catarina in order to attempt to predict the evolution from AC to LSCC based on the comparison of two dysplasia classification systems. METHODS: Histopathological features were evaluated according to the World Health Organization classification of dysplasia and binary system of classification. Also, in LSCC, pattern, stage of invasion and degree of keratinization were evaluated. A total of 58 cases of AC and 70 cases of LSCC were studied and data correlation was performed using statistical analysis. RESULTS: The presence of dyskeratosis and keratin pearls was found to be strongly associated with severe dysplasia and could represent higher proximity between the severe dysplasia in AC and LSCC. Also, changes related to the nuclei, such as hyperchromasia, nuclear pleomorphism, anisonucleosis, increase in the number and size of nucleoli, increased number of mitoses, and atypical mitoses indicate progression in dysplasia spectrum. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of clinical and histological features of AC and LSCC lead to better understanding of factors possibly associated with malignant transformation of epithelial dysplasia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161021
[Lr] Last revision date:161021
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/odi.12597


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