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[PMID]: 25193805
[Au] Autor:Hernández-Molina G; Avila-Casado C; Nuñez-Alvarez C; Cárdenas-Velázquez F; Hernández-Hernández C; Luisa Calderillo M; Marroquín V; Recillas-Gispert C; Romero-Díaz J; Sánchez-Guerrero J
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico, Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, Ophthalmology Service, Dental Service, Instituto Nacional de Ciencia...
[Ti] Title:Utility of the American-European Consensus Group and American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for Sjögren's syndrome in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases in the clinical setting.
[So] Source:Rheumatology (Oxford);54(3):441-8, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1462-0332
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) and ACR Classification Criteria for SS in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. METHODS: Three hundred and fifty patients with primary SS, SLE, RA or scleroderma were randomly selected from our patient registry. Each patient was clinically diagnosed as probable/definitive SS or non-SS following a standardized evaluation including clinical symptoms and manifestations, confirmatory tests, fluorescein staining test, autoantibodies, lip biopsy and medical chart review. Using the clinical diagnosis as the gold standard, the degree of agreement with each criteria set and between the criteria sets was estimated. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-four (44%) patients were diagnosed with SS. The AECG criteria were incomplete in 36 patients (10.3%) and the ACR criteria in 96 (27.4%; P < 0.001). Nevertheless, their ability to classify patients was almost identical, with a sensitivity of 61.6 vs 62.3 and a specificity of 94.3 vs 91.3, respectively. Either set of criteria was met by 123 patients (80%); 95 (61.7%) met the AECG criteria and 96 (62.3%) met the ACR criteria, but only 68 (44.2%) patients met both sets. The concordance rate between clinical diagnosis and AECG or ACR criteria was moderate (k statistic 0.58 and 0.55, respectively). Among 99 patients with definitive SS sensitivity was 83.3 vs 77.7 and specificity was 90.8 vs 85.6, respectively. A discrepancy between clinical diagnosis and criteria was seen in 59 patients (17%). CONCLUSION: The feasibility of the SS AECG criteria is superior to that of the ACR criteria, however, their performance was similar among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. A subset of SS patients is still missed by both criteria sets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/rheumatology/keu352

  2 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25685348
[Au] Autor:Koroma M; Lv S
[Ad] Address:Fourah Bay College, University of Sierra Leone, Freetown, Sierra Leone ; Freetown City Council, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
[Ti] Title:Ebola wreaks havoc in Sierra Leone.
[So] Source:Infect Dis Poverty;4(1):10, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2049-9957
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ebola virus disease has taken a toll on more than 8,000 lives in West Africa in 2014. The most affected countries are Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The number of people infected by Ebola in Sierra Leone surpassed that of Liberia in the last month in this year and almost half of human cases are distributed in this country. DISCUSSION: The ignorance on Ebola among people, including health workers at the early stage, plaid an important role in spread of Ebola virus disease. Subsequently, Ebola ravages urban settings for the first time and takes a huge toll on the lives. The government and international partners do make efforts to control the epidemic, however, lack of synergy make them lip service. SUMMARY: The leading role of government in the response to the epidemic should be emphasized. Basic information of Ebola should be quickly spread among communities by health education programme and social mobilization should be a basic measure for Ebola control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150218
[Lr] Last revision date:150218
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150216
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/2049-9957-4-10

  3 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25015925
[Au] Autor:Formeister EJ; Falcone MT; Mair EA
[Ad] Address:University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA eric_formeister@med.unc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Facial cutaneous necrosis associated with suspected levamisole toxicity from tainted cocaine abuse.
[So] Source:Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol;124(1):30-4, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0003-4894
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to illustrate the otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of levamisole toxicity and illuminate the features of this diagnosis. METHODS: We describe a case of a known cocaine abuser with suspected levamisole toxicity who developed cutaneous necrosis of the cheeks, earlobes, nose, upper and lower lip, and the midline hard palate. We also review the existing clinical literature about this emerging phenomenon. RESULTS: Levamisole is a common adulterant in cocaine distributed in the United States and has been reported to cause microvascular thrombosis and vasculitis with resultant skin necrosis in cocaine abusers. The distribution of skin findings characteristically involves the cheeks, earlobes, nose, lips, and hard palate and responds variably to cessation of cocaine use. In its most severe cases, immune suppression and/or surgical debridement may be required. CONCLUSION: Levamisole toxicity can frequently involve the ears, nose, and throat tissues. Otorhinolaryngologists should recognize these manifestations to expeditiously diagnose and manage this condition. Failure to do so promptly can lead to complications that may necessitate reconstructive or amputation surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antinematodal Agents/toxicity
Cocaine-Related Disorders/complications
Drug Contamination
Ear Diseases/chemically induced
Facial Dermatoses/chemically induced
Levamisole/toxicity
Palate, Hard/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cocaine-Related Disorders/pathology
Ear Auricle/drug effects
Ear Auricle/pathology
Ear Diseases/pathology
Facial Dermatoses/pathology
Female
Humans
Necrosis/chemically induced
Necrosis/pathology
Palate, Hard/pathology
Purpura/chemically induced
Purpura/pathology
Upper Extremity/pathology
Vasculitis/chemically induced
Vasculitis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antinematodal Agents); 2880D3468G (Levamisole)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141218
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0003489414542087

  4 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23962591
[Au] Autor:Kunjur J; Witherow H
[Ad] Address:ST4 in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London SW17 0QT, UK. Electronic address: jkunjur@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Long-term complications associated with permanent dermal fillers.
[So] Source:Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg;51(8):858-62, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1940
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a case series of patients with serious long-term complications associated with the injection of permanent dermal fillers. Although such complications are relatively rare, the consequences are potentially life-long, and the psychological and medical effects can often have a profound impact on the patient. The continued routine offering of these treatments will require doctors to communicate effectively with patients about the nature of the complications and the probability of risk compared with alternative treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biocompatible Materials/adverse effects
Cosmetic Techniques/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abscess/etiology
Acrylates/adverse effects
Acrylic Resins/adverse effects
Adult
Biocompatible Materials/administration & dosage
Communication
Cosmetic Techniques/psychology
Cutaneous Fistula/etiology
Facial Dermatoses/etiology
Facial Paralysis/etiology
Female
Foreign-Body Reaction/etiology
Humans
Hyaluronic Acid/adverse effects
Hydrogels/adverse effects
Injections, Intradermal
Lip Diseases/etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nasolabial Fold/pathology
Paresthesia/etiology
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Rejuvenation
Silicones/adverse effects
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Acrylates); 0 (Acrylic Resins); 0 (Aquamid); 0 (Bio-Alcamid); 0 (Biocompatible Materials); 0 (Dermalive); 0 (Hydrogels); 0 (Silicones); 9004-61-9 (Hyaluronic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131127
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23830702
[Au] Autor:Hontanilla B; Qiu SS; Marre D
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra, Spain. Electronic address: bhontanill@unav.es.
[Ti] Title:Surgical management of large venous malformations of the lower face.
[So] Source:Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg;51(8):752-6, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1940
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: We describe the benefits of an early surgical approach to large (more than 3 cm) venous malformations in the lower face, and discuss the advantages over conservative treatment. Fifty-eight patients with venous malformations of the lower face were treated in this hospital between 2005 and 2010 with sclerotherapy (lipidocanol), or láser, or resection, or all three. Only patients with recurrent malformations and a history of previously ineffective conservative treatment were included in the study (n=17). Follow-up ranged from 23-65 months (mean 40). Functional and cosmetic outcomes and recurrence were recorded on a single questionnaire. Seventeen patients with a history of recurrent malformations, which had previously been treated ineffectively with conservative treatment and were more than 3 cm in diameter, benefited from early and wide resection. No recurrences were recorded during follow-up. Patients were satisfied with the postoperative cosmetic and functional results. Large malformations are both deforming and functionally disabling. These patients, who initially do not respond to conservative treatment, benefit from early definitive resection. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 (case series with comparison).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chin/blood supply
Lip Diseases/surgery
Vascular Malformations/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Esthetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Laser Therapy/methods
Lip Diseases/therapy
Male
Patient Satisfaction
Polyethylene Glycols/therapeutic use
Recurrence
Sclerosing Solutions/therapeutic use
Sclerotherapy/methods
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Malformations/therapy
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Polyethylene Glycols); 0 (Sclerosing Solutions); 9002-92-0 (polidocanol)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131127
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23742818
[Au] Autor:Doucet JC; Herlin C; Captier G; Baylon H; Verdeil M; Bigorre M
[Ad] Address:Département de chirurgie orthopédique et plastique pédiatrique, Hôpital Lapeyronie, CHRU Montpellier, France; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Speech outcomes of early palatal repair with or without intravelar veloplasty in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.
[So] Source:Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg;51(8):845-50, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1940
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We compared the early speech outcomes of 40 consecutive children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who had been treated according to different 2-stage protocols: the Malek protocol (soft palate closure without intravelar veloplasty at 3 months; lip and hard palate repair at 6 months) (n=20), and the Talmant protocol (cheilorhinoplasty and soft palate repair with intravelar veloplasty at 6 months; hard palate closure at 18 months) (n=20). We compared the speech assessments obtained at a mean (SD) age of 3.3 (0.35) years after treatment by the same surgeon. The main outcome measures evaluated were acquisition and intelligibility of speech, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and incidence of complications. A delay in speech articulation of one year or more was seen more often in patients treated by the Malek protocol (11/20) than in those treated according to the Talmant protocol (3/20, p=0.019). Good intelligibility was noted in 15/20 in the Talmant group compared with 6/20 in the Malek group (p=0.010). Assessment with an aerophonoscope showed that nasal air emission was most pronounced in patients in the Malek group (p=0.007). Velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 11/20 in the Malek group, and in 3/20 in the Talmant group (p=0.019). No patients in the Talmant group had an oronasal fistula (p<0.001). All other outcomes were similar. Despite later closure of the soft and hard palate, early speech outcomes were better in the Talmant group because intravelar veloplasty was successful and there were no fistulas after closure of the hard palate in 2 layers.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cleft Lip/surgery
Cleft Palate/surgery
Palate, Soft/surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods
Speech/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Age Factors
Articulation Disorders/etiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Language Development Disorders/etiology
Lip/surgery
Male
Nose Diseases/etiology
Oral Fistula/etiology
Palate, Hard/surgery
Postoperative Complications
Respiratory Tract Fistula/etiology
Retrospective Studies
Rhinoplasty/methods
Speech Intelligibility/physiology
Treatment Outcome
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131127
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25642946
[Au] Autor:Pereira L; Abbehusen M; Teixeira C; Cunha J; Nascimento IP; Fukutani K; Dos-Santos W; Barral A; de Oliveira CI; Barral-Netto M; Soto M; Brodskyn CI
[Ad] Address:Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, FIOCRUZ-BA, Bahia, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Vaccination with Leishmania infantum Acidic Ribosomal P0 but Not with Nucleosomal Histones Proteins Controls Leishmania infantum Infection in Hamsters.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;10(2):e0003490, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Several intracellular Leishmania antigens have been identified in order to find a potential vaccine capable of conferring long lasting protection against Leishmania infection. Histones and Acid Ribosomal proteins are already known to induce an effective immune response and have successfully been tested in the cutaneous leishmaniasis mouse model. Here, we investigate the protective ability of L. infantum nucleosomal histones (HIS) and ribosomal acidic protein P0 (LiP0) against L. infantum infection in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis using two different strategies: homologous (plasmid DNA only) or heterologous immunization (plasmid DNA plus recombinant protein and adjuvant). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunization with both antigens using the heterologous strategy presented a high antibody production level while the homologous strategy immunized group showed predominantly a cellular immune response with parasite load reduction. The pcDNA-LiP0 immunized group showed increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-ß in the lymph nodes before challenge. Two months after infection hamsters immunized with the empty plasmid presented a pro-inflammatory immune response in the early stages of infection with increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-ß, whereas hamsters immunized with pcDNA-HIS presented an increase only in the ratio IFN-γ/ TGF-ß. On the other hand, hamsters immunized with LiP0 did not present any increase in the IFN-γ/TGF-ß and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio independently of the immunization strategy used. Conversely, five months after infection, hamsters immunized with HIS maintained a pro-inflammatory immune response (ratio IFN-γ/ IL-10) while pcDNA-LiP0 immunized hamsters continued showing a balanced cytokine profile of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover we observed a significant reduction in parasite load in the spleen, liver and lymph node in this group compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that vaccination with L. infantum LiP0 antigen administered in a DNA formulation could be considered a potential component in a vaccine formulation against visceral leishmaniasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150213
[Lr] Last revision date:150213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003490

  8 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24991966
[Au] Autor:Youlden DR; Youl PH; Peter Soyer H; Fritschi L; Baade PD
[Ad] Address:Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia....
[Ti] Title:Multiple primary cancers associated with Merkel cell carcinoma in Queensland, Australia, 1982-2011.
[So] Source:J Invest Dermatol;134(12):2883-9, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1523-1747
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The relatively high incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in Queensland provides a valuable opportunity to examine links with other cancers. A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from the Queensland Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to approximate the relative risk of being diagnosed with another primary cancer either following or prior to MCC. Patients with an eligible first primary MCC (n = 787) had more than double the expected number of subsequent primary cancers (SIR = 2.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.84-2.60; P<0.001). Conversely, people who were initially diagnosed with cancers other than MCC were about two and a half times more likely to have a subsequent primary MCC (n=244) compared with the general population (SIR = 2.69, 95% CI = 2.36-3.05; P<0.001). Significantly increased bi-directional relative risks were found for melanoma, lip cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, myelodysplastic diseases, and cancer with unknown primary site. In addition, risks were elevated for female breast cancer and kidney cancer following a first primary MCC, and for subsequent MCCs following first primary colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or lymphoid leukemia. These results suggest that several shared pathways are likely for MCC and other cancers, including immunosuppression, UV radiation, and genetics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carcinoma, Merkel Cell/epidemiology
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Australia/epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Queensland/epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/jid.2014.266

  9 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23869511
[Au] Autor:Araujo JP; Jaguar GC; Alves FA
[Ad] Address:Stomatology Department, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Syphilis related to atypical oral lesions affecting an elderly man. a case report.
[So] Source:Gerodontology;32(1):73-5, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1741-2358
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To present a case of oral syphilis in an old patient. BACKGROUND: Syphilis seems to be resurging mainly in the young. However, in the last twenty years, the elderly have become more susceptive to infectious diseases due to a more frequent use of sildenafil. CLINICAL REPORT: An 83-year-old man was referred to our clinic complaining of burning mouth. His medical history revealed papular lesions on chest and penis glans, which had been diagnosed and treated as scabiosis 2 months prior to our assessment. The intra-oral examination showed erosive and patch lesions on the bilateral lip commissures, the palate and the border of the tongue. Initially, oral herpes was suspected. However, both the serological test and the cytology were negative. Therefore, syphilis was hypothesised. Non-treponemic (VDRL) and treponemic tests (FTA-ABS) were reagent and secondary syphilis was confirmed. The treatment consisted of penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million IU/IM for 4 weeks. Both oral and skin lesions had complete remission. CONCLUSION: The present case illustrates that syphilis should be suspected in old patients with oral atypical lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:D
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ger.12047

  10 / 5608 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25654058
[Au] Autor:Nayyar P; Kumar P; Nayyar PV; Singh A
[Ad] Address:Senior Lecturer, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Desh Bhagat Dental College and Hospital , Muktsar, India ....
[Ti] Title:BOTOX: Broadening the Horizon of Dentistry.
[So] Source:J Clin Diagn Res;8(12):ZE25-9, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2249-782X
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Botox has been primarily used in cosmetic treatment for lines and wrinkles on the face, but the botulinum toxin that Botox is derived from has a long history of medically therapeutic uses. For nearly 13 years, until the introduction of Botox Cosmetic in 2002, the only FDA-approved uses of Botox were for crossed eyes (strabismus) and abnormal muscle spasms of the eyelids (blepharospasm). Since then botulinum A, and the seven other forms of the botulinum toxin, have been continuously researched and tested. Botox is a neurotoxin derived from bacterium clostridium botulinm. The toxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine (ACH), a neurotransmitter responsible for the activation of muscle contraction and glandular secretion, and its administration results in reduction of tone in the injected muscle. The use of Botox is a minimally invasive procedure and is showing quite promising results in management of muscle-generated dental diseases like Temporomandibular disorders, bruxism, clenching, masseter hypertrophy and used to treat functional or esthetic dental conditions like deep nasolabial folds, radial lip lines, high lip line and black triangles between teeth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150209
[Lr] Last revision date:150209
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150205
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7860/JCDR/2014/11624.5341


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