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[PMID]: 29506006
[Au] Autor:Vanzolini KL; da F Sprenger R; Leme GM; de S Moraes VR; Vilela AFL; Cardoso CL; Cass QB
[Ad] Address:SEPARARE - Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, São Carlos, 13565-905, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Acetylcholinesterase affinity-based screening assay on Lippia gracilis Schauer extracts.
[So] Source:J Pharm Biomed Anal;153:232-237, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-264X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The use of affinity-based protein assay produced by covalently linking acetylcholinesterase to magnetic beads, followed by chemical characterization of the selective binders using Liquid Chromatography with tandem High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) is herein described for profiling crude aqueous natural product extracts. The fishing assay was first modulated using galanthamine as a reference ligand and then, the assay condition was adjusted for the aqueous leaves extracts obtained from Lippia gracilis Schauer (genotype 201) that was used as the natural combinatory library. From the experiments, a selective binder has been undisclosed with an accurate mass of 449.1131 m/z and identified as eriodictyol 2'-O-glucoside or eriodictyol 3'-O-glucoside. The selectivity of the binding assay was demonstrated, as much as, that erydictiol 7-O-glucoside was not fished, although it was present in the crude aqueous extract. The binding assay platform exhibited high specificity and did not require any sample pretreatment, making it appropriate for profiling binders at natural libraries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505920
[Au] Autor:Cheimonidi C; Samara P; Polychronopoulos P; Tsakiri EN; Nikou T; Myrianthopoulos V; Sakellaropoulos T; Zoumpourlis V; Mikros E; Papassideri I; Argyropoulou A; Halabalaki M; Alexopoulos LG; Skaltsounis AL; Tsitsilonis OE; Aligiannis NN; Trougakos IP
[Ad] Address:Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15784, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Selective cytotoxicity of the herbal substance acteoside against tumor cells and its mechanistic insights.
[So] Source:Redox Biol;16:169-178, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2213-2317
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Natural products are characterized by extreme structural diversity and thus they offer a unique source for the identification of novel anti-tumor agents. Herein, we report that the herbal substance acteoside being isolated by advanced phytochemical methods from Lippia citriodora leaves showed enhanced cytotoxicity against metastatic tumor cells; acted in synergy with various cytotoxic agents and it sensitized chemoresistant cancer cells. Acteoside was not toxic in physiological cellular contexts, while it increased oxidative load, affected the activity of proteostatic modules and suppressed matrix metalloproteinases in tumor cell lines. Intraperitoneal or oral (via drinking water) administration of acteoside in a melanoma mouse model upregulated antioxidant responses in the tumors; yet, only intraperitoneal delivery suppressed tumor growth and induced anti-tumor-reactive immune responses. Mass-spectrometry identification/quantitation analyses revealed that intraperitoneal delivery of acteoside resulted in significantly higher, vs. oral administration, concentration of the compound in the plasma and tumors of treated mice, suggesting that its in vivo anti-tumor effect depends on the route of administration and the achieved concentration in the tumor. Finally, molecular modeling studies and enzymatic activity assays showed that acteoside inhibits protein kinase C. Conclusively, acteoside holds promise as a chemical scaffold for the development of novel anti-tumor agents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468962
[Au] Autor:Olivares-Vicente M; Barrajon-Catalan E; Herranz-Lopez M; Segura-Carretero A; Joven J; Encinar JA; Micol V
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular (IBMC). Universidad Miguel Hernandez (UMH). Avda. Universidad s/n, Edificio Torregaitan. Elche-03202, Alicante. Spain.
[Ti] Title:Plant-derived polyphenols in human health: biological activity, metabolites and putative molecular targets.
[So] Source:Curr Drug Metab;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1875-5453
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Edible plants such as Hibiscus sabdariffa, Lippia citriodora, Rosmarinus officinalis and Olea europaea, are rich in bioactive compounds that represent most of the phenolic compounds families and have exhibited potential benefits in human health. These plants have been commonly used in folk medicine for their potential therapeutic properties in human chronic diseases. Recent evidence on these plants leads to postulate that polyphenols may account for such effects. Nevertheless, the compounds or metabolites that are responsible for reaching the molecular targets are still unknown. Data based on studies that directly use complex extracts on cellular models, without considering metabolic aspects, have limited applicability. In contrast, studies exploring the absorption process, metabolites in the blood circulation and tissues have become essential to identify the intracellular final effectors that are responsible for extracts bioactivity. Once the cellular metabolites are identified, computational molecular docking techniques suppose a unique tool for virtually screening a large number of compounds on selected protein targets in order to elucidate their potential mechanisms. In this review, we provide an updated overview of the in vitro and in vivo studies on the toxicity, absorption, permeability, pharmacokinetics and cellular metabolism of bioactive compounds derived from the abovementioned plants to identify the potential compounds that are responsible for the observed health effects. We also propose the use of in silico studies to virtually screen metabolites on selected protein targets, in combination with targeted metabolomics with high resolution mass spectrometry and using the candidate metabolites in cellular models, as the method of choice for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of these compounds. .
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1389200219666180220095236

  4 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468885
[Au] Autor:Teixeira de Oliveira G; Amado PA; Siqueira Ferreira JM; Alves Rodrigues Dos Santos Lima L
[Ad] Address:a Campus Centro-Oeste Dona Lindu , Universidade Federal de São João Del-Rei , Divinópolis , Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Allelopathic effect of the ethanol extract and fractions of the aerial parts of Lippia alba (Verbenaceae).
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-6, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lippia alba, belonging to the Verbenaceae family, is one of the most commonly utilized medicinal plants in folk medicine. The allelopathic activity was assessed using seeds of Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Allium cepa (onion) by assessing the growth of the radicle and hypocotyl. The tests showed allelopathic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of lettuce and onion seeds. The best results for allelopathic activity were presented by the dichloromethane (DCM) fraction of the fresh plant, which inhibited radicle (23.04-100% lettuce and 64.17-66.36% onion) and hypocotyl (16.77-100% lettuce and 65.10-69.43% onion) formation, and as well as the DCM fraction of the dry plant, which also inhibited radicle (30.74-82.83% lettuce and 63.50-93.67% onion) and hypocotyl (24.12-70% lettuce and 69.07-79.95% onion) formation. Based on these results, it was found that the aerial parts of L. alba are rich in bioactive substances, suggesting the possibility of using of L. alba as a natural herbicide.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2018.1443090

  5 / 468 MEDLINE  
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Rosalen, Pedro Luiz
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[PMID]: 29306777
[Au] Autor:Freires IA; Santaella GM; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi J; Rosalen PL
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: ifreires@dental.ufl.edu.
[Ti] Title:The alveolar bone protective effects of natural products: A systematic review.
[So] Source:Arch Oral Biol;87:196-203, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1506
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This systematic review was carried out to identify which naturally-occurring agents and constituents isolated therefrom have effects in preventing bone loss in a ligature-induced periodontitis model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight databases were systematically searched for studies of experimental periodontitis. The data were extracted, analyzed, and the treatment outcomes were given scores based on the level of bone destruction as compared to their untreated induced-periodontitis control. RESULTS: 294 articles were found, of which 15 met the inclusion criteria. The selected studies tested a multi-herbal formulation; extracts (leaves, barks or fruit) of different plant species; and propolis. The most usual dosing protocol consisted of 3-times-a-day, 11-day treatment. The combined gel of Myracrodruon urundeuva (5%) and Lippia sidoides (0.5%) was the most active treatment, reducing 45-65% bone loss in the region of molars as compared to 73.4% of doxycycline (gold-standard). Ginkgo biloba extract (28-56 mg/kg) and propolis (100-200 mg/kg) prevented bone destruction by 50% and 40-44%, respectively. The other tested samples showed intermediate/weak activity in modulating bone resorption. CONCLUSIONS: The gel of M. urundeuva and L. sidoides, and G. biloba and propolis extracts showed strong alveolar bone protective effectiveness in induced-periodontitis in rats. Further translational research should bridge the gap between the rat study outcomes and the clinical efficacy and long-term toxicity of these formulations in humans. The compilation of the vast literature database presented herein may drive further in vivo and clinical studies with the selected efficacious formulations to subsidize their pharmaceutical application.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180217
[Lr] Last revision date:180217
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29329229
[Au] Autor:Fitsiou E; Mitropoulou G; Spyridopoulou K; Vamvakias M; Bardouki H; Galanis A; Chlichlia K; Kourkoutas Y; Panayiotidis MΙ; Pappa A
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, University Campus, Dragana, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece. elenfits@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Chemical Composition and Evaluation of the Biological Properties of the Essential Oil of the Dietary Phytochemical Lippia citriodora.
[So] Source:Molecules;23(1), 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the study was to characterize the chemical composition and biological properties of the essential oil from the plant grown in Greece. The essential oil volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry GC-MS indicating citral as the major component. Τhe antimicrobial properties were assayed using the disk diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory and non-inhibitory concentration values were determined. , , , , and were sensitive to oil, but not , Enteritidis, , and . Adversely, all microbes tested were sensitive to citral. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assays were used to assess direct antioxidant activity, which proved to be weak for both agents, while comet assay was utilized to study the cytoprotective effects against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, the oil showed a more profound cytoprotective effect compared to citral. The antiproliferative activity was evaluated in a panel of cancer cell lines using the sulforhodamine B (SRB) and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)- -(phenylamino) carbonyl-2-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assays and both agents demonstrated potent antiproliferative activity with citral being more cytotoxic than the oil. Taken together, the essential oil of and its major component, citral, exert diverse biological properties worthy of further investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28745768
[Au] Autor:Fuentes JL; García Forero A; Quintero Ruiz N; Prada Medina CA; Rey Castellanos N; Franco Niño DA; Contreras García DA; Córdoba Campo Y; Stashenko EE
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Microbiología y Mutagénesis Ambiental, Grupo de Investigación en Microbiología y Genética, Escuela de Biología, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), Bucaramanga, Colombia. jfuentes@uis.edu.co.
[Ti] Title:The SOS Chromotest applied for screening plant antigenotoxic agents against ultraviolet radiation.
[So] Source:Photochem Photobiol Sci;16(9):1424-1434, 2017 Sep 13.
[Is] ISSN:1474-9092
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this work, we investigated the usefulness of the SOS Chromotest for screening plant antigenotoxic agents against ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fifty Colombian plant extracts obtained by supercritical fluid (CO ) extraction, twelve plant extract constituents (apigenin, carvacrol, ß-caryophyllene, 1,8-cineole, citral, p-cymene, geraniol, naringenin, pinocembrin, quercetin, squalene, and thymol) and five standard antioxidant and/or photoprotective agents (curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, α-tocopherol, and Trolox®) were evaluated for their genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity against UV using the SOS Chromotest. None of the plant extracts, constituents or agents were genotoxic in the SOS Chromotest at tested concentrations. Based on the minimal extract concentration that significantly inhibited UV-genotoxicity (CIG), five plant extracts were antigenotoxic against UV as follows: Baccharis nítida (16 µg mL ) = Solanum crotonifolium (16 µg mL ) > Hyptis suaveolens (31 µg mL ) = Persea caerulea (31 µg mL ) > Lippia origanoides (62 µg mL ). Based on CIG values, the flavonoid compounds showed the highest antigenotoxic potential as follows: apigenin (7 µM) > pinocembrin (15 µM) > quercetin (26 µM) > naringenin (38 µM) > epigallocatechin gallate (108 µM) > resveratrol (642 µM). UV-genotoxicity inhibition with epigallocatechin gallate, naringenin and resveratrol was related to its capability for inhibiting protein synthesis. A correlation analysis between compound antigenotoxicity estimates and antioxidant activity evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay showed that these activities were not related. The usefulness of the SOS Chromotest for bioprospecting of plant antigenotoxic agents against UV was discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1039/c7pp00024c

  8 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29217159
[Au] Autor:Oliveira de Souza LI; Bezzera-Silva PC; do Amaral Ferraz Navarro DM; da Silva AG; Dos Santos Correia MT; da Silva MV; de Figueiredo RCBQ
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto Aggeu Magalhães IAM-FIOCRUZ/PE, Av. Moraes Rego s/n, Campus da UFPE, 50670-420 Pernambuco, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The chemical composition and trypanocidal activity of volatile oils from Brazilian Caatinga plants.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;96:1055-1064, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Essential/volatile oils (EOs) from plants used in the traditional medicine are known as a rich source of chemically diverse compounds with relevant biological activities. In this work we analysed the chemical composition and the in vitro effects of EOs from leaves of Eugenia brejoensis (EBEO), Hyptis pectinata (HPEO), Hypenia salzmannii (HSEO), Lippia macrophylla (LMEO) and seeds of Syagrus coronata (SCEO) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The EOs were extracted through hydrodistillation and its chemical composition analysed by GC/MS. The trypanocidal activity against epi- and trypomastigotes was evaluated by optical microscopy and the cytotoxicity to mammalian cells by MTT. The effects of EOs on parasite infection in macrophages were estimated by determining the survival index and the percentage of infection inhibition. The cytotoxicity against mammalian cells was compared to those of parasite by determining the Selectivity Index (SI). Overall, 114 compounds were identified: The main constituents of EOS were: δ-cadinene (15.88%), trans-caryophyllene (9.77%) e α-Muurolol (9.42%) for EBEO; trans-caryophyllene (15.24%), bicyclogermacrene (7.33%) e cis-calamenene (7.15%) for HFEO; trans-caryophyllene (30.91%), caryophyllene oxide (13.19%) and spathulenol (5.68%) for HPEO; Xanthoxylin (17.20%) trans-caryophyllene (14.34%) and methyl-eugenol (5.60%) for HSEO; Thymol (49.81%), carvacrol (31.6%) and σ-cimene (10.27%) for LMEO and octanoic acid (38.83%) dodecanoic acid (38.45%) and decanoic acid (20.51%) for SCEO. All the tested oils showed an inhibitory effect on the growth and survival of all forms of T. cruzi and moderate cytotoxicity towards the mammalian cells (100 < CC < 500 µg/mL). The EO of E. brejoensis was the most effective against the parasite presenting higher Selectivity Index for trypo- (SI = 14.45) and amastigote forms (SI = 20.11). Except for SCEO, which was the most cytotoxic for both parasite and mammalian cells, all the oils demonstrated to be more selective for the parasite than the reference drug benznidazole. Taken together our results point the essential oils from Caatinga plants, especially Eugenia brejoensis, as promissory agents for the development of new drugs against Chagas disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29111589
[Au] Autor:Gutiérrez-Grijalva EP; Angulo-Escalante MA; León-Félix J; Heredia JB
[Ad] Address:Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Carretera a Eldorado Km. 5.5, Col. Campo El Diez, Culiacán, Sinaloa 80110, México.
[Ti] Title:Effect of In Vitro Digestion on the Total Antioxidant Capacity and Phenolic Content of 3 Species of Oregano (Hedeoma patens, Lippia graveolens, Lippia palmeri).
[So] Source:J Food Sci;, 2017 Nov 07.
[Is] ISSN:1750-3841
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oregano phenolic compounds have been studied for their anti-inflammatory properties. Nonetheless, after ingestion, the gastrointestinal environment can affect their antioxidant stability and thus their bioactive properties. To evaluate the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion on the phenolic compounds of 3 species of oregano (Hedeoma patens, Lippia graveolens, and Lippia palmeri), the total reducing capacity, total flavonoid content, and antioxidant capacity were evaluated before and after in vitro GI digestion. In addition, the phenolic compounds of the 3 oregano species were identified and quantified by UPLC-PDA before and after in vitro GI digestion. It was shown that the reducing capacity, flavonoid content and antioxidant capacity were affected by the GI digestion process. Moreover, the phenolic compounds identified were apigenin-7-glucoside, scutellarein, luteolin, luteolin-7-glucoside, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, and their levels were affected by the in vitro GI process. Our results showed that the phenolic compounds from these 3 species of oregano are affected by the in vitro digestion process, and this effect is largely attributable to pH changes. These changes can modify the bioavailability and further anti-inflammatory activity of oregano phenolics, and thus, further research is needed. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Oregano is a rich source of polyphenols that have shown bioactive properties like anti-inflammatory potential. However, little is known of the gastrointestinal fate of oregano polyphenols which is imperative to fully understand its bioaccessibility. Our results are important to develop new administration strategies which could help protect the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential and bioaccessibility of such compounds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/1750-3841.13954

  10 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29075784
[Au] Autor:Raman V; Fuentes Lorenzo JL; Stashenko EE; Levy M; Levy MM; Camarillo IG
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Lippia origanoides extract induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suppresses NF-κB signaling in triple-negative breast cancer cells.
[So] Source:Int J Oncol;51(6):1801-1808, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1791-2423
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Treatments targeting hormone receptors typically fail to provide a positive clinical outcome against triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), which lack expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu). Towards identifying viable treatments for aggressive breast cancer, we have tested an extract of the tropical plant Lippia origanoides (LOE) on TNBC and normal cells lines to uncover its potential anticancer effects. Treatment with LOE reduced TNBC cell viability in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than in normal mammary epithelial MCF10A cells. In MDA-MB­231 cells, LOE was found to halt the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase via cyclin D1 and cIAP2 regulation, and induce apoptosis without promoting necrosis via caspase-8/-3 and PARP cleavage. Constitutive nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling has been shown to contribute to the heightened inflammatory state and survival in TNBC cells. Herein, we also provide evidence that LOE inhibits NF-κB signaling by reducing RIP1 protein levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. These studies reveal that LOE suppresses key features of the progression of aggressive breast cancer cells and provides a basis for further definition of its underlying mechanisms of action and anticancer potential.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171118
[Lr] Last revision date:171118
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/ijo.2017.4169


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