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[PMID]: 25170197
[Au] Autor:Boraschi P; Donati F
[Ad] Address:Piero Boraschi, Francescamaria Donati, 2 Unit of Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Pisa University Hospital, 56124 Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Postoperative biliary adverse events following orthotopic liver transplantation: assessment with magnetic resonance cholangiography.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(32):11080-94, 2014 Aug 28.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biliary adverse events following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are relatively common and continue to be serious causes of morbidity, mortality, and transplant dysfunction or failure. The development of these adverse events is heavily influenced by the type of anastomosis during surgery. The low specificity of clinical and biologic findings makes the diagnosis challenging. Moreover, direct cholangiographic procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography present an inadmissible rate of adverse events to be utilized in clinically low suspected patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) maging with MR cholangiopancreatography is crucial in assessing abnormalities in the biliary system after liver surgery, including liver transplant. MR cholangiopancreatography is a safe, rapid, non-invasive, and effective diagnostic procedure for the evaluation of biliary adverse events after liver transplantation, since it plays an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and management of these events. On the basis of a recent systematic review of the literature the summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity of MR cholangiopancreatography for diagnosis of biliary adverse events following OLT were 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. It can provide a non-invasive method of imaging surgical reconstruction of the biliary anastomoses as well as adverse events including anastomotic and non-anastomotic strictures, biliary lithiasis and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction in liver transplant recipients. Nevertheless, conventional T2-weighted MR cholangiography can be implemented with T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR cholangiography using hepatobiliary contrast agents (in particular using Gd-EOB-DTPA) in order to improve the diagnostic accuracy in the adverse events' detection such as bile leakage and strictures, especially in selected patients with biliary-enteric anastomosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i32.11080

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[PMID]: 24684546
[Au] Autor:Kang HW; Lee SK; Kim WT; Kim YJ; Yun SJ; Lee SC; Kim WJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Chungbuk National University , College of Medicine and Institute for Tumor Research, Cheongju, South Korea .
[Ti] Title:Hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia are associated with increased hazard for urolithiasis.
[So] Source:J Endourol;28(8):1001-5, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1557-900X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To assess the association between dyslipidemia and urolithiasis, a propensity score-matching study was performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fasting blood samples were taken, and serum lipid profiles were measured in 655 stone formers (SF) and 1965 propensity score-matched controls between 2005 and 2011. The controls, from a health-screening program, did not have a history of dyslipidemia or statin use and have any evidence of stone disease, as determined by abdominal radiography, ultrasonography examination. Propensity score-matching with respect to age, sex, and body mass index was used to minimize selection bias, and the logistic regression analysis was adjusted for other components of metabolic syndrome. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the SF group had significantly higher mean triglyceride and lower total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels (each P<0.001). The SF group was also more likely to have hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterolemia, and less likely to have hypercholesterolemia and high LDL cholesterolemia compared with controls (each P<0.05). When adjusted for other components of metabolic syndrome including obesity, presence of diabetes mellitus or hypertension, the odds ratio (OR) for urinary stones appeared with hypercholesterolemia (OR=0.747, P=0.003), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=1.901, P<0.001), low HDL cholesterolemia (OR=1.886, P<0.001) and high LDL cholesterolemia (OR=0.610, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study implies that dyslipidemia may play a crucial part in urinary stone risk.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypertriglyceridemia/complications
Hypolipoproteinemias/complications
Lipoproteins, HDL/blood
Urolithiasis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Mass Index
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol/blood
Fasting/blood
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia/blood
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Propensity Score
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Urolithiasis/drug therapy
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lipoproteins, HDL); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140731
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/end.2014.0135

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[PMID]: 24274943
[Au] Autor:Chabannes É; Bensalah K; Carpentier X; Bringer JP; Conort P; Denis É; Dore B; Estrade V; Gautier JR; Hadjadj H; Hubert J; Hoznek A; Lechevallier É; Meria P; Mozer P; Saussine C; Yonneau L; Traxer O; Comité lithiase de l'AFU
[Ad] Address:CHU de Besançon, 25030 Besançon, France. Electronic address: echabannes@chu-besancon.fr.
[Ti] Title:Prise en charge urologique des calculs rénaux et urétéraux de l'adulte. Mise au point du Comité Lithiase de l'Association Française d'Urologie (CLAFU). Aspects généraux. [Management of adult's renal and ureteral stones. Update of the Lithiasis Committee of the French Association of Urology (CLAFU). General considerations].
[So] Source:Prog Urol;23(16):1389-99, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1166-7087
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:The Lithiasis Committee of the French Association of Urology (CLAFU) aimed to update the current knowledge about urolithiasis. This update will be divided into four parts: 1) general considerations; 2) the management of ureteral stones; 3) the management of kidney stones; 4) metabolic assessment and medical treatment of urolithiasis. Recent technicals advances helped the urologists to improve stones management: new extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) devices, new flexible ureterorenoscopes, development of laser fragmentation. ESWL, semi-rigid and flexible ureteroscopy and the percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) remain currently the main therapeutic options. The first part of this update deals with the description and classification of stones, preoperative assessment, post-operative management and clinical follow-up. Main criteria of therapeutic choices are stone location, stone composition and stone size. Stone composition is assessed with infrared spectrophotometry analysis and its hardness is correlated with U.H. density on CT scan assessment. Preoperative assessment consists in urinary cytobacteriological examine, urinary PH, blood creatininemia, hemostasis. Low-dose CT scan is recommended before urological treatment. The result of the treatment must be done 1 or 3 months later with plain abdominal film and ultrasonography. Medical management of urolithiasis will be based on stone composition, metabolic and nutritional evaluation. Treatment success is definited by absence of residual fragments. Annual follow-up is recommended and based either on plain abdominal film and ultrasonography or low-dose CT scan.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lithotripsy, Laser
Nephrolithiasis/therapy
Nephrostomy, Percutaneous
Ureterolithiasis/therapy
Ureteroscopy
Urology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Congresses as Topic
France
Humans
Lithotripsy, Laser/instrumentation
Lithotripsy, Laser/methods
Nephrolithiasis/diagnosis
Nephrostomy, Percutaneous/instrumentation
Nephrostomy, Percutaneous/methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Preoperative Care/methods
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ureterolithiasis/diagnosis
Ureteroscopy/instrumentation
Ureteroscopy/methods
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131126
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25152990
[Au] Autor:Piccinni G; Sciusco A; De Luca GM; Gurrado A; Pasculli A; Testini M
[Ad] Address:Unit of Endocrine, Digestive and Emergency Surgery; Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General and Oncologic Surgery, University Medical School of Bari "Aldo Moro". Bari, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Minimally invasive treatment of Mirizzi's syndrome: is there a safe way? Report of a case series.
[So] Source:Ann Hepatol;13(5):558-64, 2014 Sep-Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1665-2681
[Cp] Country of publication:Mexico
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mirizzi's syndrome (MS) is a rare complication of the inveterate biliary lithiasis. Diagnostic and therapeutic standardization is still missing, especially since laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the gold standard approach for symptomatic cholelithiasis. Our study is a retrospective analysis based on a case-series. It considered 370 cholecystectomies performed from 2006 to 2011. We selected 11 patients affected by MS (2.97%). We divided them according to Csendes' classification. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) was used for biliary drainage when the patient suffered jaundice and/or cholangitis and, preoperatively, to confirm the suspicion of MS obtained through Magnetic Resonance Cholangio-Pancreatography (MRCP). We found it useful to exploit nasobiliary drainage (NBD) for intra-operative check of the biliary tree. In all 5 patients of the type 1 group MS was discovered intraoperatively and treated with Laparoscopic Sub-total Cholecystectomy (LSC). One patient suffered from biliary leakage, solved with NBD positioning. The type 2 group was made up of 2 women and 1 man. All of them were preoperatively submitted to ERCP and NBD positioning. Two underwent LSC and one was converted to laparotomy. The type 3 was represented by a 63-year-old woman suffering from recurrent cholangitis. She was submitted to MRCP, ERCP and then underwent LSC. The 2 patients affected by type 4 underwent open biliary reconstruction. In conclusion, every attempt should be made to identify MS prior to LCS since it will allow NBD insertion by ERCP. Once LCS is initiated, if MS is identified intra-operatively, we can provide the most practical surgical options.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 5724 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24630841
[Au] Autor:Pérez-Fentes D; Blanco-Gómez B; García-Freire C
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Urología, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. Electronic address: danielfentes@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy. A new therapeutic option for pediatric renal lithiasis.
[So] Source:Actas Urol Esp;38(7):483-7, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1699-7980
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng; spa
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy is an evolution from the conventional percutaneous surgery in which pyelocaliceal access is obtained through minimum bore holes. Its objective is the complete removal of the calculi, lowering the morbidity associated with larger bore percutaneous tracts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present the case of a micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy performed in a 14-year-old female patient with a 35 mm diameter kidney stone located in the renal pelvis. Surgery was performed in the Galdakao-modified supine Valdivia position. Puncture was done under ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. The 4.85 Ch needle of the Microperc(®) set was used, completing the procedure through the 8 Ch working shaft. Lasertripsy was done with the Ho:YAG laser. An indwelling double J stent was placed at the end of the procedure. RESULTS: Operating time was 170 minutes. Hospital stay was one day. She suffered renal colic after 72 hours, which was resolved with oral analgesic treatment at home (Clavien I). She returned to school on the fifth postoperative day. The double J was removed at 2 weeks. At one month of the surgery, the patient is asymptomatic, a 4mm lower calyx residual stone being observed in the abdominal ultrasound. CONCLUSION: Micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy is a step forward towards the search for a less invasive kidney stone treatment. It is a safe and effective technique in the pediatric population, and it can be performed in the supine position, even in orthotropic kidneys. Future studies and collaborative works will help to better define its indications, to optimize its technique and to analyze its cost-effectiveness compared with other treatment options.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 25055268
[Au] Autor:Botsikas D; Stefanelli S; Boudabbous S; Toso S; Becker CD; Montet X
[Ad] Address:1 All authors: Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, Division of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Model-based iterative reconstruction versus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction in low-dose abdominal CT for urolithiasis.
[So] Source:AJR Am J Roentgenol;203(2):336-40, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1546-3141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is added benefit to model-based iterative reconstruction as compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on low-dose abdominal CT in the clinical context of known or suspected urolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-three consecutive patients (35 men, 18 women; mean [SD] age, 52.3 ± 16.6 years) underwent unenhanced low-dose abdominal CT for detection or follow-up of urinary tract stones. Ureteral definition was evaluated subjectively by two blinded readers who scored it from 1 (excellent definition) to 4 (not distinguishable) and objectively by calculating contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for soft tissue and fat on a standard 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and on the corresponding model-based iterative reconstruction series. The position, maximal density, and diameter on the axial plane of stones were also evaluated on both series. RESULTS: There was an almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.872) between readers for subjective evaluation of ureteral definition. The ureteral definition was significantly better for the model-based iterative reconstruction series (mean [SD] score, 1.998 ± 0.839) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (mean score, 2.536 ± 0.799) (p < 0.0001). Mean CNR was significantly better on the model-based iterative reconstruction (17.82 ± 4.84) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (6.066 ± 1.985) (p < 0.0001). Sixty-nine stones were found in total. Their maximal density measured from model-based iterative reconstruction was significantly higher (754.4 ± 376.5 HU) than that measured from adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (559.4 ± 352.4 HU) (p < 0.0001). Size of stones was overevaluated on model-based iterative reconstruction (mean diameter, 4.91 ± 2.61 mm) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (4.52 ± 2.63 mm) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Model-based iterative reconstruction of low-dose abdominal CT can offer significantly better ureteral definition than adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and its systematic use could thus be recommended. However, it has the tendency to systematically overevaluate the stones' densities and sizes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
Urolithiasis/radiography
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Radiation Dosage
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140724
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2214/AJR.13.11937

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[PMID]: 24251715
[Au] Autor:Inui K; Yoshino J; Miyoshi H; Yamamoto S; Kobayashi T
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Second Teaching Hospital, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Nakagawa-ku, Nagoya, Japan.
[Ti] Title:New developments in diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.
[So] Source:J Gastroenterol Hepatol;28 Suppl 4:108-12, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1440-1746
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic pancreatitis is progressive and irreversible, leading to digestive and absorptive disorders by destruction of the exocrine pancreas and to diabetes mellitus by destruction of the endocrine pancreas. When complications such as pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst occur, elevated pancreatic ductal pressure exacerbates pain and induces other complications, worsening the patient's general condition. Combined treatment with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and endoscopic lithotripsy is a useful, minimally invasive, first-line treatment approach that can preserve pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic duct stenosis elevates intraductal pressure and favor both pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst formation, making effective treatment vitally important. Endoscopic treatment of benign pancreatic duct stenosis stenting frequently decreases pain in chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, stenosis of the main pancreatic duct increases risk of stone recurrence after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. Recently, good results were reported in treating pancreatic duct stricture with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent, which shows promise for preventing stone recurrence after lithotripsy in patients with pancreatic stricture. Chronic pancreatitis has many complications including pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatic atrophy, and loss of exocrine and endocrine function, as well as frequent recurrence of stones after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. As early treatment of chronic pancreatitis is essential, the new concept of early chronic pancreatitis, including characteristics findings in endoscopic ultrasonograms, is presented.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pancreatitis, Chronic/diagnosis
Pancreatitis, Chronic/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
Constriction, Pathologic/therapy
Early Diagnosis
Endoscopy
Endosonography
Humans
Lithiasis/complications
Lithiasis/therapy
Lithotripsy
Pancreatic Diseases/complications
Pancreatic Diseases/therapy
Pancreatic Ducts/pathology
Pancreatic Pseudocyst/complications
Pancreatic Pseudocyst/therapy
Pancreatitis, Chronic/complications
Pancreatitis, Chronic/pathology
Stents
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jgh.12250

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[PMID]: 23334384
[Au] Autor:Edvardsson VO; Goldfarb DS; Lieske JC; Beara-Lasic L; Anglani F; Milliner DS; Palsson R
[Ad] Address:The Rare Kidney Stone Consortium, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. vidare@landspitali.is
[Ti] Title:Hereditary causes of kidney stones and chronic kidney disease.
[So] Source:Pediatr Nephrol;28(10):1923-42, 2013 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1432-198X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC), and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC, and PH, with an emphasis on childhood manifestations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/deficiency
Cystinuria/genetics
Dent Disease/genetics
Hypercalciuria/genetics
Hyperoxaluria, Primary/genetics
Kidney Calculi/genetics
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/genetics
Nephrocalcinosis/genetics
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/genetics
Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors/genetics
Urolithiasis/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/genetics
Animals
Child
Cystinuria/diagnosis
Cystinuria/epidemiology
Cystinuria/therapy
Dent Disease/diagnosis
Dent Disease/epidemiology
Dent Disease/therapy
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Hypercalciuria/diagnosis
Hypercalciuria/epidemiology
Hypercalciuria/therapy
Hyperoxaluria, Primary/diagnosis
Hyperoxaluria, Primary/epidemiology
Hyperoxaluria, Primary/therapy
Kidney Calculi/diagnosis
Kidney Calculi/epidemiology
Kidney Calculi/therapy
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/diagnosis
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/epidemiology
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/therapy
Nephrocalcinosis/diagnosis
Nephrocalcinosis/epidemiology
Nephrocalcinosis/therapy
Phenotype
Prognosis
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/diagnosis
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy
Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors/diagnosis
Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors/epidemiology
Renal Tubular Transport, Inborn Errors/therapy
Risk Factors
Urolithiasis/diagnosis
Urolithiasis/epidemiology
Urolithiasis/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 2.4.2.7 (Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase)
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Cu] Class update date: 141001
[Lr] Last revision date:141001
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00467-012-2329-z

  9 / 5724 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23538595
[Au] Autor:Arrabal-Polo MA; Arrabal-Martin M; Garrido-Gomez J
[Ad] Address:San Cecilio University Hospital, Rua Camino de Ronda 143 4F, Granada, Spain. arrabalp@ono.com
[Ti] Title:Calcium renal lithiasis: metabolic diagnosis and medical treatment.
[So] Source:Sao Paulo Med J;131(1):46-53, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1806-9460
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Calcium renal lithiasis is a frequent condition that affects the worldwide population and has a high recurrence rate. Different metabolic changes may trigger the onset of calcium stone disorders, such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hypocitraturia and others. There are also other very prevalent disorders that are associated with calcium calculi, such as arterial hypertension, obesity and loss of bone mineral density. A correct diagnosis needs to be obtained through examining the serum and urinary parameters of mineral metabolism in order to carry out adequate prevention and treatment of this condition. Once the metabolic diagnosis is known, it is possible to establish dietary and pharmacological treatment that may enable monitoring of the disease and prevent recurrence of stone formation. Some advances in treating this pathological condition have been made, and these include use of sodium alendronate in patients with calcium renal lithiasis and osteopenia/osteoporosis, or use of a combination of a thiazide with a bisphosphonate. In summary, calcium renal lithiasis often requires multidrug treatment with strict control and follow-up of patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Calcium
Kidney Calculi/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Calcium/blood
Calcium/urine
Humans
Kidney Calculi/diagnosis
Kidney Calculi/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
[Em] Entry month:1312
[Cu] Class update date: 141002
[Lr] Last revision date:141002
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130329
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 5724 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25193790
[Au] Autor:Schoenig A; Vedrine N; Costilles T; Boiteux JP; Guy L
[Ad] Address:Service d'urologie, hôpital Gabriel-Montpied, CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 58, rue Montalemberg, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: aschoenig@chu-clermontferrand.fr....
[Ti] Title:Évaluation de la douleur lors d'une séance de lithotripsie extra-corporelle. [Pain evaluation during extracorporeal lithotropsy].
[So] Source:Prog Urol;24(12):777-82, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1166-7087
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of extracorporeal lithotripsy using lithotripter Sortz MODULITH SLK(®) without analgesics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was sent to 854 patients post-shock wave lithotripsy for urinary lithiasis. No patient had pain medication. The questionnaire included seven questions to assess the pain symptoms due to treatment. After 15 days, a reminder letter was sent. RESULTS: The response rate was 69% (591/854). The extracorporeal lithotripsy without analgesic treatment was generally well tolerated. About 70% of patients felt just a few or no pain and average pain assessment was 3.6/10 on VAS. The pain was often considered to be multifactorial, related to the treatment itself, the duration of the session and the position on the table. Anxiety seemed to play an equally important role in pain relief with an average VAS 4.5 against 2.9 for non-anxious patients. If a new session of extracorporeal lithotripsy was necessary, 53% of patients would require no pain medication. CONCLUSIONS: The extracorporeal lithotripsy could easily be done without systematic analgesics allowing for outpatient care. In contrast, anxiety seemed to be an important predictor of poor tolerance of sessions so the idea of a prophylactic anxiolytic treatment based on psychological profile of the patient should allow less aggressive and less costly management of urolithiasis. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 5.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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