Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 24526098
[Au] Autor:Göknar N; Oktem F; Ari E; Demir AD; Torun E
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Bezmialem Vakif University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Is oxidative stress related to childhood urolithiasis?
[So] Source:Pediatr Nephrol;29(8):1381-6, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1432-198X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Urolithiasis is a common condition in pediatric populations in Turkey. The role of oxidative stress in renal stone formation in pediatric patients has not been reported to date. The aim of this study was to assess oxidative stress in childhood urolithiasis. METHODS: Seventy-four children diagnosed with urolithiasis and 72 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Kidney stone formers were evaluated by analysis of metabolic conditions related to urolithiasis, such as hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and hyperuricosuria. Urine total antioxidant status (TAS), and total oxidant status (TOS) were measured, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated as an indicator of the degree of oxidative stress. RESULTS: Among the stone formers, metabolic analyses revealed that 30 % had hypercalciuria, 45 % had hypocitraturia, 6 % had hyperoxaluria and 40 % had hyperuricosuria. Elevated levels of the renal tubular damage marker urinary N-acetyl- beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) was elevated in 25 % of the patient group, but microalbuminuria was not detected. Total oxidant status and total antioxidant status were significantly higher in stone formers than in the controls (p = 0.023 and 0.004, respectively). In addition, urinary NAG was significantly correlated with TOS (r = 0.427, p = 0.019). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of pediatric stone formers.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Oxidative Stress
Urolithiasis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetylglucosaminidase/urine
Antioxidants/metabolism
Child
Child, Preschool
Creatinine/urine
Female
Humans
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Turkey/epidemiology
Urolithiasis/epidemiology
Urolithiasis/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); AYI8EX34EU (Creatinine); EC 3.2.1.52 (Acetylglucosaminidase)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140628
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00467-014-2773-z

  2 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24940675
[Au] Autor:Ceballos-Picot I; Daudon M; Harambat J; Bensman A; Knebelmann B; Bollée G
[Ad] Address:a Université Paris Descartes, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Laboratoire de Biochimie Métabolomique et protéomique, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades , Paris , France.
[Ti] Title:2,8-Dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis: a not so rare inborn error of purine metabolism.
[So] Source:Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids;33(4-6):241-52, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2335
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation and formation of urinary crystals and kidney stones. The disease can be present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available, including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity in red blood cells, make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the lack of recognition of this metabolic disorder frequently resulted in a delay in diagnosis and treatment with grave consequences. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance to prevent irreversible loss of renal function. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying DHA stones formation and chronic kidney disease, along with the issues of diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency. Moreover, we report the mutations in the APRT gene responsible for APRT deficiency in 51 French patients (43 families) including 22 pediatric cases (18 families) among the 64 patients identified in the biochemistry laboratories of Necker Hospital, Paris (1978-2013).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/deficiency
Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Urolithiasis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/metabolism
Humans
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/diagnosis
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/epidemiology
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/metabolism
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/therapy
Prevalence
Urolithiasis/diagnosis
Urolithiasis/epidemiology
Urolithiasis/metabolism
Urolithiasis/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 2.4.2.7 (Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140619
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/15257770.2013.853780

  3 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25688535
[Au] Autor:Páez A; Molina R; González N
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Urología. Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada. Madrid.
[Ti] Title:Alta resolución para todos en el área de consultas de un Servicio de Urología. [High resolution for all in the clinics área of a Urology Department].
[So] Source:Arch Esp Urol;68(1):96-104, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1576-8260
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of a one-stop clinic in terms of proportion of diagnostic-therapeutic orientation during 2013. METHODS: All patients were referred from primary care facilities in the district of Fuenlabrada, Madrid, Spain (population 221.705). Previously, referral protocols were agreed. Seven senior urologists participated. 6674 referrals (January-December 2013) were eligible. RESULTS: 4534 referrals (4535/6674, 68%) were eventually evaluable. Patients taking advantage of the one-stop format were significantly younger than those needing extra consultations (chi2<0,001). Overall, reasons for consultation clearly affected the feasibility of the one-stop approach (chi2<0.001), the one-stop policy being substantiated in most consultations due to subfertility (89.4%), male sexual dysfunction (89.2%), testicular complains (88.3%) and other male genital complains (80.3%). On the contrary, extra consultations were the rule for degenerative diseases of the urinary tract (45%), malignancy (57%) and renal colic pain or urinary lithiasis (63.2%). No relationships could be identified between the referral centre and the feasibility of the one-stop approach (p=ns). The multivariate analysis confirmed the independent effect of the health problem (p<0.001) and patient age (p<0002) on the chances of having a successful one-stop approach. CONCLUSIONS: a one-stop philosophy should be the standard for all patients in urology clinics.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 25406395
[Au] Autor:Garcia TX; Farmaha JK; Kow S; Hofmann MC
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 1105, PO Box 301402, Houston, TX 77230-1402, USA Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802, USA....
[Ti] Title:RBPJ in mouse Sertoli cells is required for proper regulation of the testis stem cell niche.
[So] Source:Development;141(23):4468-78, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9129
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stem cells are influenced by their surrounding microenvironment, or niche. In the testis, Sertoli cells are the key niche cells directing the population size and differentiation fate of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Failure to properly regulate SSCs leads to infertility or germ cell hyperplasia. Several Sertoli cell-expressed genes, such as Gdnf and Cyp26b1, have been identified as being indispensable for the proper maintenance of SSCs in their niche, but the pathways that modulate their expression have not been identified. Although we have recently found that constitutively activating NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells leads to premature differentiation of all prospermatogonia and sterility, suggesting that there is a crucial role for this pathway in the testis stem cell niche, a true physiological function of NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells has not been demonstrated. To this end, we conditionally ablated recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (Rbpj), a crucial mediator of NOTCH signaling, in Sertoli cells using Amh-cre. Rbpj knockout mice had: significantly increased testis sizes; increased expression of niche factors, such as Gdnf and Cyp26b1; significant increases in the number of pre- and post-meiotic germ cells, including SSCs; and, in a significant proportion of mice, testicular failure and atrophy with tubule lithiasis, possibly due to these unsustainable increases in the number of germ cells. We also identified germ cells as the NOTCH ligand-expressing cells. We conclude that NOTCH signaling in Sertoli cells is required for proper regulation of the testis stem cell niche and is a potential feedback mechanism, based on germ cell input, that governs the expression of factors that control SSC proliferation and differentiation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cellular Microenvironment/physiology
Immunoglobulin J Recombination Signal Sequence-Binding Protein/metabolism
Sertoli Cells/metabolism
Spermatogonia/physiology
Stem Cells/physiology
Testis/cytology
Testis/embryology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/physiology
Immunoglobulin J Recombination Signal Sequence-Binding Protein/genetics
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Receptors, Notch/metabolism
Signal Transduction/physiology
Testis/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Immunoglobulin J Recombination Signal Sequence-Binding Protein); 0 (Rbpj protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, Notch)
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150214
[Lr] Last revision date:150214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1242/dev.113969

  5 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24530299
[Au] Autor:Wu CF; Liu CC; Chou YH; Shiea J; Shen JT; Wang SS; Wu MT
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan....
[Ti] Title:Increased detection rate of melamine-containing calcium urolithiasis by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique in clinical practice.
[So] Source:Clin Chim Acta;431:294-8, 2014 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3492
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Studies have shown that melamine may be associated with urolithiasis. A more sensitive method is needed to analyze melamine in urinary stones to identify potential causes of urolithiasis.Methods: Here we compare the analytical methods of detecting melamine in urinary stones by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF MS) in the laboratory and clinic. First, we established the melamine detection limit in melamine cyanurate standard by the methods of FTIR spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF MS. Subsequently, we applied these two methods to 54 adult patients with upper urinary tract calcium urolithiasis.Results: We found that the detection limit of melamine in melamine cyanurate standard by MALD-TOF MS was~10,000-fold more sensitive than FTIR.We applied both instruments to 54 stone specimens from 54 calcium urolithias is patients. In those without distinctive melamine pattern in the FTIR spectra,melamine could be detected by MALD-TOF MS in an additional 12 out of 42 subjects' stone specimens (28.6%). Compared to MALD-TOF MS negative subjects (n = 30), those positive subjects (n = 12) excreted significantly higher urinary melamine levels (P <0.05).Conclusion: Compared to FTIR,MALDI-TOFMS is amore sensitive method in detecting the content of melamine in melamine-containing kidney stones
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Triazines/analysis
Urolithiasis/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization/methods
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Triazines); 37640-57-6 (melamine cyanurate); N3GP2YSD88 (melamine)
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 150215
[Lr] Last revision date:150215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140407
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25535194
[Au] Autor:Licciardello A; Arena M; Nicosia A; Di Stefano B; Calì G; Arena G; Minutolo V
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgical Sciences, Organ Transplantation and Advances Technologies, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. alessio.licciardello@hotmail.it.
[Ti] Title:Preoperative risk factors for conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy.
[So] Source:Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci;18(2 Suppl):60-8, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2284-0729
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for symptomatic gallstones. However, a conversion to open surgery is sometimes still required to complete the procedure safely. The aim of this study is to identify the predictive factors of conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy in both elective and emergency cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones from January 2011 to October 2013 was performed. Data considered for analysis were: demographic data, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, preoperative ERCP, indication for surgery, and the timing of the intervention in acute cholecystitis. Conversion to open cholecystectomy was chosen as the dependent variable for both, univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: 414 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. 245 were female (59.1%) and 169 (40.8%) male, with a mean age of 51.7±16.4 years. The indication for surgery was acute cholecystitis in 91 cases (21.9%). Lithiasis of the bile duct was found in 40 patients (9.6%), and it was identified preoperatively in 37 patients, all treated with a preoperative ERCP. Conversion to open occurred in 33 cases (7.9%). Univariate analysis revealed as risk factor for conversion: increased age, acute cholecystitis, comorbidities, elevated white blood cell count, increased level of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that acute cholecystitis (OR 5.63) and age > 65 years (OR 3.025) were independent predictive factors for conversion. CONCLUSIONS: These patients should be properly informed of their increased risk of conversion and should be operated by surgeons skilled in laparoscopic procedures to reduce this risk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 25443947
[Au] Autor:Sahota A; Parihar JS; Capaccione KM; Yang M; Noll K; Gordon D; Reimer D; Yang I; Buckley BT; Polunas M; Reuhl KR; Lewis MR; Ward MD; Goldfarb DS; Tischfield JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ. Electronic address: sahota@biology.rutgers.edu....
[Ti] Title:Novel cystine ester mimics for the treatment of cystinuria-induced urolithiasis in a knockout mouse model.
[So] Source:Urology;84(5):1249.e9-15, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1527-9995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of l-cystine dimethyl ester (CDME), an inhibitor of cystine crystal growth, for the treatment of cystine urolithiasis in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse model of cystinuria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CDME (200 µg per mouse) or water was delivered by gavage daily for 4 weeks. Higher doses by gavage or in the water supply were administered to assess organ toxicity. Urinary amino acids and cystine stones were analyzed to assess drug efficacy using several analytical methods. RESULTS: Treatment with CDME led to a significant decrease in stone size compared with that of the water group (P = .0002), but the number of stones was greater (P = .005). The change in stone size distribution between the 2 groups was evident by micro computed tomography. Overall, cystine excretion in urine was the same between the 2 groups (P = .23), indicating that CDME did not interfere with cystine metabolism. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cystine stones from the CDME group demonstrated a change in crystal habit, with numerous small crystals. l-cysteine methyl ester was detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer in stones from the CDME group only, indicating that a CDME metabolite was incorporated into the crystal structure. No pathologic changes were observed at the doses tested. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that CDME promotes formation of small stones but does not prevent stone formation, consistent with the hypothesis that CDME inhibits cystine crystal growth. Combined with the lack of observed adverse effects, our findings support the use of CDME as a viable treatment for cystine urolithiasis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cystine/analogs & derivatives
Cystinuria/drug therapy
Urolithiasis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic/genetics
Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/genetics
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Cystine/chemistry
Cystinuria/urine
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
X-Ray Microtomography
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic); 0 (Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral); 0 (L-cystine dimethylester); 0 (Slc3a1 protein, mouse); 48TCX9A1VT (Cystine)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141202
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25174655
[Au] Autor:Sfoungaristos S; Gofrit ON; Katz R; Yutkin V; Landau EH; Pode D; Duvdevani M
[Ad] Address:Hadassah University Hospital, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: sfoungaristosst@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:A predictive model for stone radiopacity in kidney-ureter-bladder film based on computed tomography parameters.
[So] Source:Urology;84(5):1021-5, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1527-9995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To create a model for prediction of stone radiopacity based on computed tomography (CT) parameters. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 513 patients referred to our department for consultation for urolithiasis between March 2011 and December 2012. CT scan and kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) film were reviewed to identify the value of scout film in revealing radiopaque stones and to identify parameters predicting radiopacity in scout-negative stones. RESULTS: Of 375 patients who met inclusion criteria and were finally analyzed, all 206 visible stones in scout film were KUB radiopaque. Analyzing scout-negative stones, we found that 92 stones (54.4%) were radiopaque in KUB. Multivariate analysis showed that stone size >9.7 mm, non-midureteral stone location, anterior abdominal wall fat thickness ≤23.9 mm, and Hounsfield units >772 are all independent predictors of stone radiopacity in stones that were not visible in scout film, and the aforementioned parameters were used for the creation of a Web-based calculator. CONCLUSION: Scout film can identify radiopaque stones in KUB with high specificity, and thus, KUB can be used for following-up stones which are visible in CT scout film. For stones that are not visible in scout film, the probability of a stone to be radiopaque in KUB can be calculated trough our predictive model.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Kidney/radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Ureter/radiography
Urinary Bladder/radiography
Urolithiasis/radiography
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Kidney Calculi/radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Ureteral Calculi/radiography
Urinary Bladder Calculi/radiography
X-Ray Film
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141202
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24359665
[Au] Autor:Furrow E; Pfeifer RJ; Osborne CA; Lulich JP
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA. Electronic address: furro004@umn.edu....
[Ti] Title:An APRT mutation is strongly associated with and likely causative for 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis in dogs.
[So] Source:Mol Genet Metab;111(3):399-403, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1096-7206
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:2,8-Dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) urolithiasis in people is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (APRT). 2,8-DHA urolithiasis has recently been reported in two dogs, but, to the authors' knowledge, no studies have yet investigated the genetic basis for susceptibility to the development of 2,8-DHA urolithiasis in this species. Our aim was to sequence APRT in dogs affected by 2,8-DHA urolithiasis and compare the results to clinically healthy dogs of similar ancestral lineages. Our hypothesis was that we would identify an autosomal recessive mutation in APRT that is associated with the disease. The case population consisted of six dogs with a history of 2,8-DHA urolithiasis: five Native American Indian Dogs (NAIDs) and a mixed breed. The control population consisted of adult NAIDs with no history of urolithiasis. We sequenced APRT and identified a missense mutation in a highly conserved codon of APRT (c.260G>A; p.Arg87Gln). The c.260A mutation was present in a homozygous state in all six dogs with 2,8-DHA urolithiasis, and it was strongly associated with the disease. This exact missense mutation has been previously reported to cause loss of APRT enzyme function in a human cell line, and it is likely a causative mutation in dogs. Therefore, the dog offers a naturally-occurring genetic animal model for 2,8-DHA urolithiasis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/deficiency
Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase/genetics
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/genetics
Mutation, Missense
Urolithiasis/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenine/analogs & derivatives
Animals
Dogs
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Homozygote
Humans
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/pathology
Metabolism, Inborn Errors/veterinary
Urolithiasis/pathology
Urolithiasis/veterinary
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:30377-37-8 (2,8-dihydroxyadenine); EC 2.4.2.7 (Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase); JAC85A2161 (Adenine)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150203
[Lr] Last revision date:150203
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140228
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 5805 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24521601
[Au] Autor:Yang T; Tu PA; Zhang H; Lu JH; Shen YN; Yuan SX; Lau WY; Lai EC; Lu CD; Wu MC; Li JW; Shen F
[Ad] Address:Department of Hepatic Surgery, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Risk factors of surgical site infection after hepatic resection.
[So] Source:Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol;35(3):317-20, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1559-6834
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A study of 7,388 consecutive patients after hepatic resection between 2011 and 2012 identified hepatolithiasis, cirrhosis, and intraoperative blood transfusion as the only independent risk factors of both incisional and organ/space surgical site infection (SSI). Patients with these conditions should be cared for with caution to lower SSI rates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hepatectomy/adverse effects
Surgical Wound Infection/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Transfusion/adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lithiasis/complications
Liver Cirrhosis/complications
Liver Diseases/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM; N
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1086/675278


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