Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29510749
[Au] Autor:Sprong H; Azagi T; Hoornstra D; Nijhof AM; Knorr S; Baarsma ME; Hovius JW
[Ad] Address:Centre for Zoonoses & Environmental Microbiology, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. hein.sprong@rivm.nl.
[Ti] Title:Control of Lyme borreliosis and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):145, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme borreliosis (LB) and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (TBDs) are diseases that emerge from interactions of humans and domestic animals with infected ticks in nature. Nature, environmental and health policies at (inter)national and local levels affect the risk, disease burden and costs of TBDs. Knowledge on ticks, their pathogens and the diseases they cause have been increasing, and resulted in the discovery of a diversity of control options, which often are not highly effective on their own. Control strategies involving concerted actions from human and animal health sectors as well as from nature managers have not been formulated, let alone implemented. Control of TBDs asks for a "health in all policies" approach, both at the (inter)national level, but also at local levels. For example, wildlife protection and creating urban green spaces are important for animal and human well-being, but may increase the risk of TBDs. In contrast, culling or fencing out deer decreases the risk for TBDs under specific conditions, but may have adverse effects on biodiversity or may be societally unacceptable. Therefore, in the end, nature and health workers together must carry out tailor-made control options for the control of TBDs for humans and animals, with minimal effects on the environment. In that regard, multidisciplinary approaches in environmental, but also medical settings are needed. To facilitate this, communication and collaboration between experts from different fields, which may include patient representatives, should be promoted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2744-5

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[PMID]: 29454734
[Au] Autor:Benelli G; Duggan MF
[Ad] Address:Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, via del Borghetto 80, 56124, Pisa, Italy; The BioRobotics Institute, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, 56025, Pontedera, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: benelli.giovanni@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Management of arthropod vector data - Social and ecological dynamics facing the One Health perspective.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;182:80-91, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are spread by direct and/or indirect contacts between a pathogen or parasite and their hosts. Arthropod vectors have evolved as excellent bloodsuckers, providing an elegant transportation mode for a wide number of infectious agents. The nature of pathogen and parasite transfer and the models used to predict how a disease might spread are magnified in complexity when an arthropod vector is part of the disease cycle. One Health is a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment. It would benefit from a structured analysis to address vectoring of arthropod-borne diseases as a dynamic transactional process. This review focused on how arthropod vector data can be used to better model and predict zoonotic disease outbreaks. With enhanced knowledge to describe arthropod vector disease transfer, researchers will have a better understanding about how to model disease outbreaks. As public health research evolves to include more social-ecological systems, the roles of society, ecology, epidemiology, pathogen/parasite evolution and animal behavior can be better captured in the research design. Overall, because of more collaborative data collection processes on arthropod vectors, disease modeling can better predict conditions where EIDs will occur.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29032534
[Au] Autor:Caimano MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, UConn Health, 263 Farmington Ave., Farmington, CT, 06030-3715, USA. mcaima@uchc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Generation of Mammalian Host-Adapted Borrelia burgdorferi by Cultivation in Peritoneal Dialysis Membrane Chamber Implantation in Rats.
[So] Source:Methods Mol Biol;1690:35-45, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1940-6029
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The transmission, survival, and virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi depend upon the spirochete's ability to modulate its transcriptome as it cycles between its arthropod vector and reservoir host. This complex adaptive process is collectively referred to as "host-adaptation." The paucibacillary nature of borrelial infections precludes the detailed analysis of host adaptation within infected mammalian tissues. To circumvent this limitation, we (J Clin Invest 101:2240-2250, 1998) developed a model system whereby spirochetes are cultivated within dialysis membrane chambers (DMCs) surgically implanted within the peritoneal cavity of a rat. Spirochetes within DMCs are exposed to many, if not all, of the environmental signals and physiological cues required for mammalian host adaptation but are protected from clearance by the host's immune system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-1-4939-7383-5_3

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[PMID]: 29522180
[Au] Autor:Ripoche M; Gasmi S; Adam-Poupart A; Koffi JK; Lindsay LR; Ludwig A; Milord F; Ogden NH; Thivierge K; Leighton PA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Passive Tick Surveillance Provides an Accurate Early Signal of Emerging Lyme Disease Risk and Human Cases in Southern Canada.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme disease is an emerging public health threat in Canada. In this context, rapid detection of new risk areas is essential for timely application of prevention and control measures. In Canada, information on Lyme disease risk is collected through three surveillance activities: active tick surveillance, passive tick surveillance, and reported human cases. However, each method has shortcomings that limit its ability to rapidly and reliably identify new risk areas. We investigated the relationships between risk signals provided by human cases, passive and active tick surveillance to assess the performance of tick surveillance for early detection of emerging risk areas. We used regression models to investigate the relationships between the reported human cases, Ixodes scapularis (Say; Acari: Ixodidae) ticks collected on humans through passive surveillance and the density of nymphs collected by active surveillance from 2009 to 2014 in the province of Quebec. We then developed new risk indicators and validated their ability to discriminate risk levels used by provincial public health authorities. While there was a significant positive relationship between the risk signals provided all three surveillance methods, the strongest association was between passive tick surveillance and reported human cases. Passive tick submissions were a reasonable indicator of the abundance of ticks in the environment (sensitivity and specificity [Se and Sp] < 0.70), but were a much better indicator of municipalities with more than three human cases reported over 5 yr (Se = 0.88; Sp = 0.90). These results suggest that passive tick surveillance provides a timely and reliable signal of emerging risk areas for Lyme disease in Canada.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjy030

  5 / 12635 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508053
[Au] Autor:Bause L; Niemeier A; Krenn V
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Rheumaorthopädie, St. Josef-Stift Sendenhorst, Sendenhorst, Deutschland.
[Ti] Title:Arthur-Vick-Preis der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädische Rheumatologie 2017. [Arthur Vick Prize 2017 of the German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology].
[So] Source:Z Rheumatol;77(2):168-174, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1435-1250
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:The German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology (DGORh) honored Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn (MVZ-ZHZMD-Trier) with the Arthur Vick Prize 2017. With this award, scientific results with high impact on the diagnosis, therapy and pathogenetic understanding of rheumatic diseases are honored. In cooperation with pathologists and colleagues from various clinical disciplines Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn developed several histopathologic scoring systems which contribute to the diagnosis and pathogenetic understanding of degenerative and rheumatic diseases. These scores include the synovitis score, the meniscal degeneration score, the classification of periprosthetic tissues (SLIM classification), the arthrofibrosis score, the particle score and the CD15 focus score. Of highest relevance for orthopedic rheumatology is the synovitis score which is a semiquantitative score for evaluating immunological and inflammatory changes of synovitis in a graded manner. Based on this score, it is possible to divide results into low-grade synovitis and high-grade synovitis: a synovitis score of 1-4 is called low-grade synovitis and occurs for example in association with osteoarthritis (OA), post-trauma, with meniscal lesions and hemochromatosis. A synovitis score of 5-9 is called high-grade synovitis, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Lyme arthritis, postinfection and reactive arthritis as well as peripheral arthritis with Bechterew's disease (sensitivity 61.7%, specificity 96.1%). The first publication (2002) and an associated subsequent publication (2006) of the synovitis score has led to national and international acceptance of this score as the standard for histopathological assessment of synovitis. The synovitis score provides a diagnostic, standardized and reproducible histopathological evaluation method for joint diseases, particularly when this score is applied in the context with the joint pathology algorithm.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00393-018-0433-6

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[PMID]: 29393443
[Au] Autor:Zhao Z; Tao L; Liu A; Ma M; Li H; Zhao H; Yang J; Wang S; Jin Y; Shao X; Bao F
[Ad] Address:School of Basic Medical Sciences, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan 650500, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:NF­κB is a key modulator in the signaling pathway of Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA­induced inflammatory chemokines in murine microglia BV2 cells.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):4953-4958, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme disease, caused by the bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is a tick­borne zoonosis. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a principal manifestation of Lyme disease and its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins caused similar inflammatory effects as exhibited in Lyme neuroborreliosis. Basic membrane protein A (BmpA) is one of the dominant lipoproteins in the Borrelia burgdorferi membrane. In addition, nuclear factor κ­B (NF­κB) modulates the regulation of gene transcription associated with immunity and inflammation; however, in unstimulated cells, NF­κB is combined with the inhibitor of NF­κB (IκB­ß). Therefore, it was hypothesized that NF­κB may be associated with BmpA­induced inflammation and the occurrence of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role that NF­κB serves in the signaling pathway of rBmpA­induced inflammatory chemokines. The present study measured the expression levels of NF­κB, IκB­ß and inflammatory chemokines following recombinant BmpA (rBmpA) stimulation of murine microglia BV2 cells. Following stimulation with rBmpA, concentrations of pro­inflammatory cytokines including C­X­C motif chemokine 2, C­C motif chemokine (CCL) 5 and CCL22 were determined by ELISA analysis. Reverse transcription­quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of NF­κB p65 and IκB­ß. The data demonstrated that concentrations of these chemokines in cell supernatants increased significantly following rBmpA stimulation. NF­κB was overexpressed, but IκB­ß expression was significantly decreased. In conclusion, these results suggested that NF­κB serves an important stimulatory role in the signaling pathway of rBmpA­induced inflammatory chemokines in BV2 cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8526

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[PMID]: 29242055
[Au] Autor:Crossland NA; Alvarez X; Embers ME
[Ad] Address:Division of Bacteriology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences, Covington, Louisiana; Division of Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences, Covington, Louisiana.
[Ti] Title:Late Disseminated Lyme Disease: Associated Pathology and Spirochete Persistence Posttreatment in Rhesus Macaques.
[So] Source:Am J Pathol;188(3):672-682, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1525-2191
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nonhuman primates currently serve as the best experimental model for Lyme disease because of their close genetic homology with humans and demonstration of all three phases of disease after infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. We investigated the pathology associated with late disseminated Lyme disease (12 to 13 months after tick inoculation) in doxycycline-treated (28 days; 5 mg/kg, oral, twice daily) and untreated rhesus macaques. Minimal to moderate lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, with a predilection for perivascular spaces and collagenous tissues, was observed in multiple tissues, including the cerebral leptomeninges, brainstem, peripheral nerves from both fore and hind limbs, stifle synovium and perisynovial adipose tissue, urinary bladder, skeletal muscle, myocardium, and visceral pericardium. Indirect immunofluorescence assays that combined monoclonal (outer surface protein A) and polyclonal antibodies were performed on all tissue sections that contained inflammation. Rare morphologically intact spirochetes were observed in the brains of two treated rhesus macaques, the heart of one treated rhesus macaque, and adjacent to a peripheral nerve of an untreated animal. Borrelia antigen staining of probable spirochete cross sections was also observed in heart, skeletal muscle, and near peripheral nerves of treated and untreated animals. These findings support the notion that chronic Lyme disease symptoms can be attributable to residual inflammation in and around tissues that harbor a low burden of persistent host-adapted spirochetes and/or residual antigen.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 12635 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29452400
[Au] Autor:Weinstein ER; Rebman AW; Aucott JN; Johnson-Greene D; Bechtold KT
[Ad] Address:Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
[Ti] Title:Sleep Quality in Well-defined Lyme Disease: A Clinical Cohort Study in Maryland.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: Lyme disease (LD) is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Approximately 5-15% of patients develop post-antibiotic treatment symptoms termed post-treatment LD syndrome (PTLDS). The primary objective of this study was to examine and quantify sleep quality among patients with early Lyme disease during the acute and convalescent periods, including among the subset who met criteria for PTLDS. Methods: This paper draws from a clinical cohort study of early LD participants (n=122) and a sub-cohort of individuals who later met criteria for PTLDS (n=6). Participants were followed for one year after antibiotic treatment. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and standardized measures of pain, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and functional impact were administered at all visits for participants and controls (n=26). Participants meeting criteria for PTLDS at one-year post-treatment were compared to a subset of PSQI-defined poor-sleeping controls (n=10). Results: At the pre-treatment visit, early LD participants reported poorer sleep than controls. By 6 months post-treatment, participant sleep scores as a group returned to control levels. PTLDS participants reported significantly worse global sleep and sleep disturbance scores and worse fatigue, functional impact, and more cognitive-affective depressive symptoms compared to poor-sleeping controls. Conclusions: Participants with early LD experienced poor sleep quality, which is associated with typical LD symptoms of pain and fatigue. In the subset of patients who developed PTLDS, sleep quality remains affected for up to one year post-treatment and is commonly associated with pain. Sleep quality should be considered in the clinical picture for LD and PTLDS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy035

  9 / 12635 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425271
[Au] Autor:Conant JL; Powers J; Sharp G; Mead PS; Nelson CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington.
[Ti] Title:Lyme Disease Testing in a High-Incidence State: Clinician Knowledge and Patterns.
[So] Source:Am J Clin Pathol;149(3):234-240, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1943-7722
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives: Lyme disease (LD) incidence is increasing, but data suggest some clinicians are not fully aware of recommended procedures for ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests. The study objective was to assess clinicians' knowledge and practices regarding LD testing in a high-incidence region. Methods: We distributed surveys to 1,142 clinicians in the University of Vermont Medical Center region, of which 144 were completed (12.6% response rate). We also examined LD laboratory test results and logs of calls to laboratory customer service over a period of 2.5 years and 6 months, respectively. Results: Most clinicians demonstrated basic knowledge of diagnostic protocols, but many misinterpreted Western blot results. For example, 42.4% incorrectly interpreted a positive immunoglobulin M result as an overall positive test in a patient with longstanding symptoms. Many also reported receiving patient requests for unvalidated tests. Conclusions: Additional education and modifications to LD test ordering and reporting systems would likely reduce errors and improve patient care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ajcp/aqx153

  10 / 12635 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29340592
[Au] Autor:Eckman EA; Pacheco-Quinto J; Herdt AR; Halperin JJ
[Ad] Address:Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ.
[Ti] Title:Neuroimmunomodulators in neuroborreliosis and Lyme encephalopathy.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Lyme encephalopathy, characterized by non-specific neurobehavioral symptoms including mild cognitive difficulties, may occur in patients with systemic Lyme disease and is often mistakenly attributed to CNS infection. Identical symptoms occur in innumerable other inflammatory states and may reflect the effect of systemic immune mediators on the CNS. Methods: Multiplex immunoassays were used to characterize the inflammatory profile in serum and CSF from Lyme and non-Lyme patients with a range of symptoms to determine if there are specific markers of active CNS infection (neuroborreliosis), or systemic inflammatory mediators associated with neurobehavioral syndromes. Results: CSF CXCL13 was elevated dramatically in confirmed neuroborreliosis (n=8) and to a lesser extent in possible neuroborreliosis (n=11) and other neuroinflammatory conditions (n=44). Patients with Lyme (n=63) or non-Lyme (n=8) encephalopathy had normal CSF findings, but had elevated serum levels of IL-7, TSLP, IL-17A, IL-17F, and MIP-1α/CCL3. Conclusions: CSF CXCL13 is a sensitive and specific marker of neuroborreliosis in individuals with Borrelia-specific intrathecal antibody (ITAb) production. However, CXCL13 does not distinguish individuals strongly suspected of having neuroborreliosis, but lacking confirmatory ITAb, from those with other neuroinflammatory conditions. Patients with mild cognitive symptoms occurring during acute Lyme disease, and/or following appropriate treatment, have normal CSF but elevated serum levels of T-helper 17 markers and T-cell growth factors. These markers are also elevated in non-Lyme disease patients experiencing similar symptoms. Our results support that in the absence of CSF abnormalities, neurobehavioral symptoms are associated with systemic inflammation, not CNS infection or inflammation, and are not specific to Lyme disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciy019


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