Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Lymphocytes [Words]
References found : 448384 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 44839 go to page                         

  1 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25699211
[Au] Autor:Cimato TR; Palka BA
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Clinical and Translational Research Center , Buffalo, NY , USA.
[Ti] Title:Effects of statins on TH1 modulating cytokines in human subjects.
[So] Source:PeerJ;3:e764, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2167-8359
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background. Activation of the innate immune system by cholesterol accelerates atherosclerosis. High levels or modified forms of cholesterol stimulate release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18 that synergistically stimulate T lymphocytes to produce the atherogenic cytokine interferon-γ. While activation of the innate immune system by cholesterol is well-described in animal models and human subjects with high cholesterol levels or known atherosclerotic disease, the interaction of cholesterol and lipoproteins with the innate immune system in human subjects without known atherosclerosis is less well-described. The goal of our study was to assess the TH1 modulating cytokines IL-12 p40 and IL-18, and their counter regulatory cytokines IL-18 binding protein and IL-27, to determine if their levels are linked to cholesterol levels or other factors. Methods. We performed a blinded, randomized hypothesis-generating study in human subjects without known atherosclerotic disease. We measured serum lipids, lipoprotein levels, and collected plasma samples at baseline. Subjects were randomized to two weeks of therapy with atorvastatin, pravastatin, or rosuvastatin. Lipids and cytokine levels were measured after two weeks of statin treatment. Subjects were given a four-week statin-free period. At the end of the four-week statin-free period, venous blood was sampled again to determine if serum lipids returned to within 5% of their pre-statin levels. When lipid levels returned to baseline, subjects were again treated with the next statin in the randomization scheme. IL-12, IL-18, IL-18 binding protein, and IL-27 were measured at baseline and after each statin treatment to determine effects of statin treatment on their blood levels, and identify correlations with lipids and lipoproteins. Results. Therapy with statins revealed no significant change in the levels of IL-12, IL-18, IL-18 binding protein or IL-27 levels. We found that IL-18 levels positively correlate with total cholesterol levels (r (2) = 0.15, p < 0.03), but not HDL or LDL cholesterol. In contrast, IL-12 p40 levels inversely correlated with total cholesterol (r (2) = -0.17, p < 0.008), HDL cholesterol (r (2) = -0.22, p < 0.002), and apolipoprotein A1 (r (2) = -0.21, p < 0.002). Similarly, IL-18 binding protein levels inversely correlated with apolipoprotein A1 levels (r (2) = -0.13, p < 0.02). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that total cholesterol levels positively regulate IL-18, while HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 may reduce IL-12 p40 and IL-18 binding protein levels. Additional studies in a larger patient population are needed to confirm these findings, and verify mechanistically whether HDL cholesterol can directly suppress IL-12 p40 and IL-18 binding protein levels in human subjects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150220
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7717/peerj.764

  2 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25698868
[Au] Autor:Kavitha KT; Latha BR; Raj GD
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Madras Veterinary College, Chennai, 600 007 India.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of cell mediated immune response in rabbits immunized with affinity purified 35 kDa midgut antigen of Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides ticks.
[So] Source:J Parasit Dis;39(1):90-3, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0971-7196
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cell mediated immune response to immunoaffinity chromatography purified midgut antigen of Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides ticks in rabbits was studied by using lymphocyte transformation test. This test was carried out by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine kit method. The blastogenic response of peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal rabbit to different concentrations of antigen and mitogen (Con A) showed that 2 µg of antigen and 2 µg of mitogen gave maximum stimulation index. The antigen specific responsiveness of immunized rabbits with affinity purified 35 kDa midgut antigen was highly significant (P â‰¤ 0.01) compared to mitogen. The maximum lymphocyte stimulation index (LSI) of 2.47 was observed on 49 day post immunization in immunized group. The lymphocytes separated from control animal cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 2 µg of antigen and 2 µg of mitogen (Con A) were never stimulated and their LSI values were below 2.0.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150220
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12639-013-0291-8

  3 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25649846
[Au] Autor:Cao BB; Huang Y; Jiang YY; Qiu YH; Peng YP
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, and Co-innovation Center of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, 19 Qixiu Road, Nantong, Jiangsu Province, 226001, China.
[Ti] Title:Cerebellar Fastigial Nuclear Glutamatergic Neurons Regulate Immune Function via Hypothalamic and Sympathetic Pathways.
[So] Source:J Neuroimmune Pharmacol;10(1):162-78, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1557-1904
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We previously have shown that cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) modulates immune function, but pathways or mechanisms underlying this immunomodulation require clarification. Herein, an anterograde and retrograde tracing of nerve tracts between the cerebellar FN and hypothalamus/thalamus was performed in rats. After demonstrating a direct cerebellar FN-hypothalamic/thalamic glutamatergic projection, 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), an inhibitor of glutaminase that catalyzes glutamate synthesis, was injected bilaterally in the cerebellar FN and simultaneously, D,L-threo-ß-hydroxyaspartic acid (THA), an inhibitor of glutamate transporters on cell membrane, was bilaterally injected in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) or the ventrolateral (VL) thalamic nucleus. DON treatment in the FN alone decreased number of glutamatergic neurons that projected axons to the LHA and also diminished glutamate content in both the hypothalamus and the thalamus. These effects of DON were reduced by combined treatment with THA in the LHA or in the VL. Importantly, DON treatment in the FN alone attenuated percentage and cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells and also lowered percentage and cytokine production of T lymphocytes. These DON-caused immune effects were reduced or abolished by combined treatment with THA in the LHA, but not in the VL. Simultaneously, DON treatment elevated level of norepinephrine (NE) in the spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes, and THA treatment in the LHA, rather than in the VL, antagonized the DON-caused NE elevation. These findings suggest that glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellar FN regulate innate and adaptive immune functions and the immunomodulation is conveyed by FN-hypothalamic glutamatergic projections and sympathetic nerves that innervate lymphoid tissues.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11481-014-9572-y

  4 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25408215
[Au] Autor:Bulati M; Buffa S; Martorana A; Gervasi F; Camarda C; Azzarello DM; Monastero R; Caruso C; Colonna-Romano G
[Ad] Address:Immunosenescence Unit, Department of Pathobiology and Medical and Forensic Biotechnologies (DIBIMEF), University of Palermo, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Double Negative (IgG+IgD-CD27-) B Cells are Increased in a Cohort of Moderate-Severe Alzheimer's Disease Patients and Show a Pro-Inflammatory Trafficking Receptor Phenotype.
[So] Source:J Alzheimers Dis;44(4):1241-51, 2015 Jan 1.
[Is] ISSN:1875-8908
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, irreversible, and debilitating disease for which no effective preventive or disease modifying therapies or treatments have so far been detected. The crucial step in AD pathogenesis is the production of amyloid-ß42 peptide, which causes chronic inflammation. Activated cells in the central nervous system (CNS) produce pro-inflammatory mediators that lead to the recruitment of myeloid or lymphocytic cells. As a consequence, the communication between the CNS and peripheral blood of AD subjects could influence the lymphocyte distribution and/or the expression of phenotypic markers. In the present paper, we show a significant decrease in total CD19+ B lymphocytes and a remodeling of the B cell subpopulations in moderate-severe AD patients, compared with their coeval healthy controls and mild AD subjects. In particular, we report a significant reduction in naïve B cells (IgD+CD27-) and a simultaneous increase in double negative (DN, IgD-CD27-) memory B lymphocytes. We have also evaluated the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR7 in total and naïve/memory B cells from mild and moderate-severe AD patients, with the aim to detect a possible relationship between the trafficking profile and the stage of the disease. Our results demonstrate that both the amount and the trafficking profile of B cells are related to the severity of AD. The results discussed in this paper suggest a well-selected antibody panel should be used as an additional test for the identification of early AD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3233/JAD-142412

  5 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25467712
[Au] Autor:Alexis A; Carrer DP; Droggiti DI; Louis K; Pistiki A; Netea MG; Kapessidou Y; Giamarellos-Bourboulis EJ
[Ad] Address:4th Department of Internal Medicine, University of Athens, Medical School, 1 Rimini Str., 12462 Athens, Greece; Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, Hospital Saint-Pierre, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 322 rue Haute, 1000 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: alexandrosalexis@hotmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Immune responses in relation to the type and time of thermal injury: An experimental study.
[So] Source:Injury;46(2):227-32, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0267
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Thermal injuries are followed by a complex immune response, but the relationship between the severity of burn injury and the time exposure to the thermal injury on the extent of the immune response is still not known. OBJECTIVE: This study focuses on characterising the effect of temperature and time exposure on the post-burn immune response. METHODS: We used 120 C57BL/6 male mice divided equally in 5 burn groups and one sham operated group (groups A-E and sham). Ten mice per group were sacrificed at 24 and 48h after burn injury and whole blood was collected; specimens of liver, lung, spleen, kidney and bowel were excised. Apoptosis and TREM-1 expression on circulating blood cells were measured. Splenocytes were isolated and stimulated for cytokine production; the rate of apoptosis of splenocytes was also measured. RESULTS: Production of IL-17 from splenocytes of mice group D was enhanced. Considerable effects were shown on the apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and of spleen cells. The apoptotic rates varied between groups and also evolved after 24 and 48h. To examine the origin of this differential response, quantitative bacterial cultures of liver, lung and kidney were made but no differences were observed compared with sham-operated animals. LIMITATIONS: This study was based on an experimental murine model. CONCLUSION: There is a unique response for each type of injury depending on the temperature of the thermal source and the exposure time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24925364
[Au] Autor:Yilmaz S; Ünal F; Yüzbasioglu D; Gönenç I
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Health Sciences, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey syilmaz@health.ankara.edu.tr....
[Ti] Title:Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and cell division delays by clomiphene citrate in human lymphocytes.
[So] Source:Hum Exp Toxicol;34(3):284-8, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1477-0903
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Clomiphene citrate (CC) is a selective estrogen receptor modulator and is used for the treatment of in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, intrauterine insemination, and so on. In this study, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and cell cycle delays were analyzed to investigate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of CC in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy women. METHODS: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from two donors were used to detect genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of CC. Lymphocytes were treated with various concentrations (0.40, 0.80, 1.60, and 3.20 µg/ml) of CC. A negative (distilled water) and a positive control (mitomycin-C = 0.20 µg/ml) were also used simultaneously with test substance-treated cultures. SCEs and cell division delays were measured from 25 cells and 100 cells perdonor, respectively. RESULTS: CC significantly increased the mean SCE value at all concentrations compared with the negative control. This increase was found to be dose dependent (r = 0.83) and at the highest concentration, nearly two times higher increase was observed than the negative control. However, replication index was not affected by the CC treatment. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that CC is genotoxic for human lymphocytes in vitro. Further investigations, especially in vivo are now needed in different test organisms to clarify the genotoxic activity of CC, which should also help to better understand genotoxic mechanism of this ovulation-stimulating drug.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0960327114537846

  7 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25696913
[Au] Autor:Nikiforow S; Alyea EP
[Ad] Address:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:Maximizing GVL in allogeneic transplantation: role of donor lymphocyte infusions.
[So] Source:Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program;2014(1):570-5, 2014 Dec 5.
[Is] ISSN:1520-4383
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) can induce complete and durable remissions in some patients with hematologic malignancies who have relapsed after allogeneic transplantation, providing definitive evidence of a GVL effect. Despite the great promise initially envisioned for DLI as a method to augment GVL after transplantation, it utility is limited by low response rates in diseases other than chronic myelogenous leukemia and by the development of GVHD, the principal complication of DLI. To maximize GVL potency while minimizing toxicity, cellular effectors active in GVL need to be elucidated. Insight into mechanisms of GVL, such as reversal of in situ T-cell exhaustion, may allow identification of patients who will respond to DLI based on the presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in the BM. Understanding the clinical factors that influence the effectiveness and abrogate the toxicity of DLI, such as cell dose and timing of DLI after transplantation, will allow further optimization of DLI. This chapter reviews novel strategies that maximize the GVL effect of DLI by enhancing activity while limiting toxicity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1182/asheducation-2014.1.570

  8 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25696912
[Au] Autor:Bollard CM; Barrett AJ
[Ad] Address:Children's National Health System and The George Washington University, Washington, DC; and.
[Ti] Title:Cytotoxic T lymphocytes for leukemia and lymphoma.
[So] Source:Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program;2014(1):565-9, 2014 Dec 5.
[Is] ISSN:1520-4383
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This chapter focuses on the recent advances in adoptive T-cell immunotherapies, not only for patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but also in the autologous setting using T cells early in the disease process for the treatment of the highest-risk patients with leukemias and lymphomas. The particular emphasis is to highlight the role of T-cell therapies for hematologic malignancies using a non-gene-transfer approach to direct specificity, including the clinical use of T-cell therapies for EBV-associated lymphomas and strategies for targeting nonviral lymphoma- and leukemia-associated antigens.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1182/asheducation-2014.1.565

  9 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24703003
[Au] Autor:Leite da Silveira P; Gonçalves Silva V; Rizzato Paschoal J; Nizam Pfeilsticker L
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, State University at Campinas), School of Medical Sciences, PO Box 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: silveirapriscila@hotmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Bilateral peripheral facial palsy and mastoid infiltration as symptoms of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.
[So] Source:Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis;132(1):41-3, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-730X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although Bell's palsy (BP) is the most common cause of peripheral facial palsy (PFP), other etiologies merit investigation. CASE REPORT: A 60-year-old female patient presented with recurrent bilateral PFP. Although the patient had a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), she had initially been diagnosed with BP-related PFP and had been treated accordingly. When the PFP recurred, additional diagnostic tests were performed. The resulting immunohistochemical profile included CD3 positivity in a few reactive T lymphocytes; positivity for myeloperoxidase in atypical cells; and focal positivity for CD34 and proto-oncogene c-kit proteins in neoplastic cells, thus confirming the suspicion of mastoid infiltration caused by relapsed AML. CONCLUSION: In patients with neoplastic disease, a finding of PFP calls for extensive investigation in order to rule out the involvement of the temporal bone.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 448384 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25433656
[Au] Autor:Lai JP; Mertens RB; Mirocha J; Koo J; Venturina M; Chung F; Mendez AB; Kahn M; Dhall D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA, jinpinglai@slu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of PAX6 and PAX8 as Immunohistochemical Markers for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.
[So] Source:Endocr Pathol;26(1):54-62, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1559-0097
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To compare the utility of PAX6 and PAX8 as immunohistochemical markers for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of pancreatic origin, we performed PAX6 and PAX8 immunostains on 178 NETs, including 110 primary NETs (26 pancreatic, 10 gastric, 12 duodenal, 22 jejuno-ileal, 10 rectal, 30 pulmonary) and 68 NETs metastatic to the liver (24 pancreatic, 1 duodenal, 37 jejuno-ileal, 1 rectal, 5 pulmonary). Among primary NETs, PAX6 and PAX8 were positive in 65 % (17/26) and 73 % (19/26) of pancreatic, 0 % (0/10) and 10 % (1/10) of gastric, 92 % (11/12) and 92 % (11/12) of duodenal, 0 % (0/22) and 0 % (0/22) of jejuno-ileal, 90 % (9/10) and 80 % (8/10) of rectal, and 0 % (0/30) and 23 % (7/30) of pulmonary NETs, respectively. PAX6 and PAX8 positivity was seen in 46 % (11/24) and 50 % (12/24) of metastatic pancreatic NETs to the liver, respectively. None of the nonpancreatic NETs metastatic to the liver were immunoreactive for either PAX6 or PAX8. PAX6 showed a slightly but statistically significant higher specificity for pancreatic NETs than did PAX8 (P = 0.039), while the sensitivities were similar (P = 0.51). PAX6 had the additional advantages over PAX8 of not exhibiting nonspecific cytoplasmic staining of tumor cells and only infrequently staining background lymphocytes. Since rectal NETs rarely present with metastatic disease, positive staining of a metastatic NET of unknown primary origin for PAX6 and/or PAX8 favors a pancreatic or duodenal origin. This information may be helpful in directing further diagnostic studies to identify the primary site of the metastatic tumor.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12022-014-9346-3


page 1 of 44839 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information