Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29500673
[Au] Autor:Amateau SK; Lim CH; McDonald NM; Arain M; Ikramuddin S; Leslie DB
[Ad] Address:Interventional and Therapeutic Endoscopy, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical Center, MMC 36-420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. amateau@umn.edu.
[Ti] Title:EUS-Guided Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Anastomosis with Lumen-Apposing Metal Stent: Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traditionally, restoration of normal bowel continuity after resection and bypass of a diseased or obstructed gastrointestinal tract can only be achieved through surgery, which can be technically challenging and comes with a risk of adverse events. Here, we describe our institutions' experience with endoscopic-guided gastroenterostomy or enteroenterostomy with lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS) from March 2015 to August 2016. Ten patients had gastrogastrostomy (gastric pouch to gastric remnant) and three patients had jejunogastrostomy (Roux limb to gastric remnant) for the reversal of Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery. One patient had gastroduodenostomy (stomach to duodenal bulb) post antrectomy and one patient had jejunojejunostomy for distal obstruction following Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Technical and clinical success were achieved in all patients, save for delayed anastomotic stenosis following stent removal in one patient, with a mean follow-up of 126 days (3-318 days) with minimal complications in two patients. Endoscopic gastrointestinal anastomosis therefore may be a safe and feasible technique to re-establish continuity of the digestive system following bypass in the short-term.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3171-6

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[PMID]: 29490937
[Au] Autor:Carvalho GA; Paz-Filho G; Mesa Junior CO; Graf H
[Ad] Address:G Carvalho, SEMPR, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil carvalho.gisah@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Pitfalls on the replacement therapy for primary and central hypothyroidism in adults.
[So] Source:Eur J Endocrinol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1479-683X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypothyroidism is one of the most common hormone deficiencies in adults. Most of the cases, particularly those of overt hypothyroidism, are easily diagnosed and managed, with excellent outcomes if treated adequately. However, minor alterations of thyroid function determine nonspecific manifestations. Primary hypothyroidism due to chronic autoimmune thyroiditis is largely the most common cause of thyroid hormone deficiency. Central hypothyroidism is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by decreased thyroid hormone secretion by an otherwise normal thyroid gland, due to lack of TSH. The standard treatment of primary and central hypothyroidism is hormone replacement therapy with levothyroxine sodium (LT4). Treatment guidelines of hypothyroidism recommend monotherapy with LT4 due to its efficacy, long-term experience, favorable side effect profile, ease of administration, good intestinal absorption, long serum half-life and low cost. Despite being easily treatable with a daily dose of LT4, many patients remain hypothyroid due to malabsorption syndromes, autoimmune gastritis, pancreatic and liver disorders, drug interactions, polymorphisms in type 2 deiodinase, high fiber diet, and more frequently, non-compliance to LT4 therapy. Compliance to levothyroxine treatment in hypothyroidism is compromised by daily and fasting schedule. Many adult patients remain hypothyroid due to all the above mentioned. and many attempts to improve levothyroxine therapy compliance and absorption have been made.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390264
[Au] Autor:Tan J; Li X; Guo Y; Xie L; Wang J; Ma J; Jiang L
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:Hereditary folate malabsorption with a novel mutation on SLC46A1: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e8712, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) is characterized by folate deficiency with impaired intestinal folate absorption and impaired folate transport into the central nervous system. Its manifestations mainly include macrocytic anemia, recurrent infections, and neurological deficits. The neurological manifestations include progressive psychomotor retardation, behavioral disorders, and early-onset seizures. PATIENT CONCERNS: From early infancy, a Chinese boy had experienced macrocytic anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, recurrent pneumonia, diarrhea, and mouth ulcers. He also presented with progressive neurological symptoms. DIAGNOSIS: A novel mutation in the SLC46A1 gene was identified, and HFM was diagnosed at 18 months of age. INTERVENTIONS: After the HFM diagnosis, the boy was treated with folinic acid. LESSONS: Folinic acid supplementation is effective and may offer life-changing therapy for patients with HFM.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Folic Acid Deficiency/genetics
Malabsorption Syndromes/genetics
Mutation
Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Asian Continental Ancestry Group
China
Folic Acid Deficiency/drug therapy
Humans
Infant
Leucovorin/therapeutic use
Malabsorption Syndromes/drug therapy
Male
Vitamin B Complex/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter); 0 (SLC46A1 protein, human); 12001-76-2 (Vitamin B Complex); Q573I9DVLP (Leucovorin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008712

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[PMID]: 28467906
[Au] Autor:Muñoz S; Búa S; Rodríguez-Acebes S; Megías D; Ortega S; de Martino A; Méndez J
[Ad] Address:DNA Replication Group, Molecular Oncology Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), 3 Melchor Fernández Almagro, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:In Vivo DNA Re-replication Elicits Lethal Tissue Dysplasias.
[So] Source:Cell Rep;19(5):928-938, 2017 May 02.
[Is] ISSN:2211-1247
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mammalian DNA replication origins are "licensed" by the loading of DNA helicases, a reaction that is mediated by CDC6 and CDT1 proteins. After initiation of DNA synthesis, CDC6 and CDT1 are inhibited to prevent origin reactivation and DNA overreplication before cell division. CDC6 and CDT1 are highly expressed in many types of cancer cells, but the impact of their deregulated expression had not been investigated in vivo. Here, we have generated mice strains that allow the conditional overexpression of both proteins. Adult mice were unharmed by the individual overexpression of either CDC6 or CDT1, but their combined deregulation led to DNA re-replication in progenitor cells and lethal tissue dysplasias. This study offers mechanistic insights into the necessary cooperation between CDC6 and CDT1 for facilitation of origin reactivation and describes the physiological consequences of DNA overreplication.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: DNA Replication
Diarrhea, Infantile/genetics
Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism
Malabsorption Syndromes/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics
Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism
DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism
Diarrhea, Infantile/metabolism
Female
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
Malabsorption Syndromes/metabolism
Male
Mice
Nuclear Proteins/genetics
Nuclear Proteins/metabolism
Transgenes
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (CDC6 protein, mouse); 0 (Cell Cycle Proteins); 0 (DNA-Binding Proteins); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Ris2 protein, mouse)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29413012
[Au] Autor:Adike A; DiBaise JK
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, 13400 East Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA.
[Ti] Title:Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Nutritional Implications, Diagnosis, and Management.
[So] Source:Gastroenterol Clin North Am;47(1):193-208, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1942
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), characterized by the presence of excessive bacteria in the small intestine, is typically described as a malabsorptive syndrome occurring in the context of gut stasis syndromes. SIBO is now considered to be a disorder associated with diverse clinical conditions without classic risk factors for SIBO and a cause of several nonspecific gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal symptoms. Because there is currently no gold standard for diagnosing SIBO, its prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of other diseases remain uncertain; as does optimal treatment of patients with relapsing symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29413007
[Au] Autor:Jeejeebhoy KN; Duerksen DR
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 784 Alexander Road, Hamilton, Ontario L9G 3E9, Canada. Electronic address: khushjeejeebhoy@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Malnutrition in Gastrointestinal Disorders: Detection and Nutritional Assessment.
[So] Source:Gastroenterol Clin North Am;47(1):1-22, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1942
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:All patients with significant gastrointestinal disease should be clinically assessed for protein calorie malnutrition by using the Subjective Global Assessment. Blood tests for anemia, electrolytes, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, ferritin, vitamin B , and folate should be considered for assessment of major micronutrients. Where malabsorption or inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed, bone mineral density using dual beam x-ray absorptiometry, 25-OH vitamin D levels, and measurement of other vitamins and trace elements should be considered. In addition, in at-risk patients, vitamin and trace element clinical deficiency syndromes should be considered during patient assessment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29281659
[Au] Autor:Mwape I; Bosomprah S; Mwaba J; Mwila-Kazimbaya K; Laban NM; Chisenga CC; Sijumbila G; Simuyandi M; Chilengi R
[Ad] Address:Center for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
[Ti] Title:Immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccine (RotarixTM) in infants with environmental enteric dysfunction.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0187761, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Deployment of rotavirus vaccines has contributed to significant declines in diarrheal morbidity and mortality globally. Unfortunately, vaccine performance in low-middle income countries (LMICs) is generally lower than in developed countries. The cause for this has been associated with several host and maternal factors including poor water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) status, which are predominant in LMICs. More recently, environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) has specifically been hypothesized to contribute to poor vaccine uptake and response. The aim of this study was to examine the association between serological biomarkers of EED and seroconversion to rotavirus vaccine in Zambian infants. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 142 infants who had been fully immunized with Rotarix™, and had known seroconversion status. Seroconversion was defined as 4-fold or more increase in rotavirus-specific IgA titres between pre-vaccination and one month post-dose two vaccination. We performed ELISA assays to assess soluble CD14 (sCD14), Endotoxin Core IgG Antibodies (EndoCAb), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP) and Zonulin according to the manufacturers protocols. Generalised linear model with family-poisson, link-log and robust standard error was used to estimate the independent effects of biomarkers on seroconversion adjusting for important cofounders. RESULTS: The median concentration of Zonulin, Soluble CD14, EndoCaB, and IFABP were 209.3 (IQR = 39.7, 395.1), 21.5 (IQR = 21.5, 21.5), 0.3 (IQR = 0.3, 0.3), and 107.7 (IQR = 6.4, 1141.4) respectively. In multivariable analyses adjusting for the independent effect of other biomarkers and confounders (i.e. age of child at vaccination, breast-milk anti-rotavirus IgA, infant serum anti-rotavirus IgG, and IgA seropositivity at baseline), there was strong evidence of about 24% increase in seroconversion due to doubling Zonulin concentration (Adjusted risk ratio (aRR) = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.12 to1.37; p<0.0001). Similarly, we found about 7% increase in seroconversion due to doubling IFABP concentration (aRR = 1.07; 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.13; p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: We found that high levels of zonulin and IFABP played a role in seroconversion. It is plausible that increased gut permeability in EED allows greater uptake of the live virus within the vaccine, but later consequences result in deleterious local structural distortions and malabsorption syndromes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Intestinal Diseases/immunology
Rotavirus Vaccines/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis
Antibodies, Viral/immunology
Biomarkers/blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A/blood
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Infant
Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/immunology
Male
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins); 0 (Immunoglobulin A); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Lipopolysaccharide Receptors); 0 (Rotavirus Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180129
[Lr] Last revision date:180129
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0187761

  8 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29258769
[Au] Autor:Wimalawansa SJ; Razzaque DMS; Al-Daghri NM
[Ad] Address:Endocrinology, Metabolism & Nutrition, Cardio Metabolic Institute, 661 Darmody Avenue North Brunswick, NJ 08902, USA; Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: suniljw@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Calcium and Vitamin D in Human Health: Hype or Real?
[So] Source:J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol;, 2017 Dec 16.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1220
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The incidence and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency are increasing worldwide. It is estimated that over 50% of population in the world have low in vitamin D (i.e., hypovitaminosis D; levels below 30 ng/mL). 80% of our vitamin D requirement comes from the ultraviolet rays from sunlight, and for the remainder, we rely from the diet and supplements. The latter become important when one is exposing to less than optimal amounts of sunlight, inability of the skin to generate vitamin D efficiently, and/or having secondary causes that leads to increase catabolism of vitamin D. The normal serum vitamin D level is thought to be about 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L); a range between 30 and 60 ng/mL (75 and 150 nmol/L). The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of 2011 suggests, 600 IU is adequate for people below the age 71 who are not exposed to sunshine. Although IOM amount might be of relevance to the ambulatory healthy individuals, in disease conditions, very few patients would manage to reach serum vitamin D level above 30 ng/mL, which most scientists consider the minimum adequate level for optimal health. While the natural way to obtain vitamin D is through safe sunlight exposure, an additional daily intake of 1,000 IU of vitamin D is needed for people with lighter-skin color. With suboptimal sun exposure in those with dark-skinned and older adults need an additional 2,000 IU/day or more, vitamin D to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels over 30 ng/mL; the safe upper limit of oral daily supplementation is considered as 5,000 IU. However, vulnerable groups including those who are disabled, obese, and those with gastrointestinal abnormalities and/or malabsorption syndromes, institutionalized people (e.g., nursing homes and in prisons), and during pregnancy and lactation, needs approximately 4,000 IU per day for optimal physiological activities. Vitamin D is critical for enhancing gastrointestinal calcium absorption and mineralization of the osteoid tissue. In is also important for other physiological functions, such as muscle strength and neuromuscular coordination, release of hormones, subduing autoimmunity, and curtailing the development of certain cancers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29142524
[Au] Autor:Ham H; Lee BI; Oh HJ; Park SH; Kim JS; Park JM; Cho YS; Choi MG
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:A case of celiac disease with neurologic manifestations misdiagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
[So] Source:Intest Res;15(4):540-542, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1598-9100
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy and is a rare disease in Asia, including in Korea. However, the ingestion of wheat products, which can act as a precipitating factor of CD, has increased rapidly. CD is a common cause of malabsorption, but many patients can present with various atypical manifestations as first presented symptoms, including anemia, osteopenia, infertility, and neurological symptoms. Thus, making a diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of CD that mimicked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The patient was a sexagenary man with a history of progressive motor weakness for 2 years. He was highly suspected as having ALS. During evaluation of his neurological symptoms, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed because he had experienced loose stools and weight loss for the previous 7 months. On EGD, the duodenal mucosa appeared smooth. A biopsy revealed severe lymphoplasma cell infiltration with flattened villi. His serum endomysial antibody (immunoglobulin A) titer was 1:160 (reference, <1:40). Finally, he was diagnosed as having CD, and a gluten-free diet was immediately begun. At a 4-month follow-up, his weight and the quality of his stool had improved gradually, and the neurological manifestations had not progressed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5217/ir.2017.15.4.540

  10 / 9706 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28904394
[Au] Autor:Kalajian TA; Aldoukhi A; Veronikis AJ; Persons K; Holick MF
[Ad] Address:Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Section Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nutrition and Weight Management, Department of Medicine, Vitamin D, Skin, and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ultraviolet B Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) Are More Efficient and Effective in Producing Vitamin D in Human Skin Compared to Natural Sunlight.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;7(1):11489, 2017 Sep 13.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin is important for health. Those with fat malabsorption disorders malabsorb vitamin D and thus must rely on cutaneous production of vitamin D . Vitamin D is generated secondary to exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (whether from the sun or from an artificial source). Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been developed to emit ultraviolet radiation. Little is known about the efficiency of UVB emitting LEDs tuned to different wavelengths for producing vitamin D in human skin. Ampoules containing 7-dehydrocholesterol were exposed to a LED that emitted a peak wavelength at 293, 295, 298 or 305 nm to determine their efficiency to produce previtamin D . The 293 nm LED was best suited for evaluating its effectiveness for producing vitamin D in human skin due to the shorter exposure time. This LED was found to be 2.4 times more efficient in producing vitamin D in human skin than the sun in less than 1/60 the time. This has significant health implications for medical device development in the future that can be used for providing vitamin D supplementation to patients with fat malabsorption syndromes as well as patients with other metabolic abnormalities including patients with chronic kidney disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170917
[Lr] Last revision date:170917
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-11362-2


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