Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29248457
[Au] Autor:Zolghadri Y; Pal Choudhuri S; Ocal O; Layeghi-Ghalehsoukhteh S; Berhe F; Hale MA; Wilkie TM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Department of Basic Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Malnutrition in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA): Dietary Pancreatic Enzymes Improve Short-Term Health but Stimulate Tumor Growth.
[So] Source:Am J Pathol;188(3):616-626, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1525-2191
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a deadly cancer that resists efforts to identify better chemotherapeutics. PDA is associated with chronic pancreatitis and acinar cell dedifferentiation. This reduces enzyme production by the exocrine pancreas, resulting in digestive insufficiencies. Malabsorption of partially digested food causes bloating, overfilled intestines, abdominal pain, excessive feces, steatorrhea, and malnutrition. These maladies affect quality of life and restrict treatment options for pancreatitis and PDA. Here, we characterize health benefits and risks of dietary pancreatic enzymes in three mouse models of PDA-KC, KCR8-16, and KIC. KC expresses oncogenic Kras in pancreatic tissue whereas KCR8-16 also has deletions of the Rgs8 and Rgs16 genes. Rgs proteins inhibit the release of digestive enzymes evoked by G-protein-coupled-receptor agonists. KC and KCR8-16 mice developed dedifferentiated exocrine pancreata within 2 months of age and became malnourished, underweight, hypoglycemic, and hypothermic. KC mice adapted but KCR8-16 mice rapidly transitioned to starvation after mild metabolic challenges. Dietary pancreatic enzyme supplements reversed these symptoms in KC and KCR8-16 animals, and extended survival. Therefore, we tested the benefits of pancreatic enzymes in an aggressive mouse model of PDA (KIC). Median survival improved with dietary pancreatic enzyme supplements and was extended further when combined with warfarin and gemcitabine chemotherapy. However, dietary pancreatic enzymes stimulated tumor growth in the terminal stages of disease progression in KIC mice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29309862
[Au] Autor:Sultana B; Yaqoob S; Zafar Z; Bhatti HN
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Electronic address: bushrasultana2005@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Escalation of liver malfunctioning: A step toward Herbal Awareness.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;216:104-119, 2018 Apr 24.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: About 2-5% of the world's population is suffering from liver toxicity including Pakistan with the second highest rate of hepatitis prevalence. Liver is a vital body organ which not only performs metabolic activities but also aids in detoxification, storage and digestion of food. Now a day's malnutrition, alcohol consumption and drug addiction are major causes of liver diseases throughout the world. In fact, there is no possible outcome to compensate liver malfunction for long term, and transplantation of liver is the only option left after the irretrievable injury of hepatic function. Subsequently, natural based therapeutic approaches are in the process of scrupulous testing as strong hepatoprotective mediator. In this regard plants are well thought hepatoprotective agents having multiple active components. In this review, based on species' pharmacology and safety we have compiled some plants which show strong hepatoprotective activity, main phytoconstituents with biological activities and few commercially used herbal formulations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ethnopharmacological information was gathered by an extensive literature survey like WHO monographs on selected herbal medicinal plants (Vol 1-Vol 4); Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy, Mills S and Bone K, Churchill Livingstone, London, UK; Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals, Wichtl M Medpharm Press, Stuttgart 3rd edn; Pharmacology and Applications of Chinese Materia Medica Vols 1 and 2, Chang H-M and But P P-H World Scientific, Singapore; British Herbal Compendium Vol. 2, Bradley P British Herbal Medicine Association, Bournemouth, UK; ESCOP Monographs 2nd edn. Thieme, Stuttgart, Germany; as well as by using electronic databases such as Pubchem, Chemspider, http://www.herbal-ahp.org; http://www.ahpa.org; http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2003/9241546271.pdf; http://www.escop.com, Pubmed, HubMed and Scopus. RESULTS: Data for more about 29 plants have been accomplished for their bioactive constituent(s), biological activities and medicinal uses. Some of the plants have been identified as strong hepato-modulator. Such knowledge about traditional medicinal plants can be globally applied for safe and evidence based use in pharmacological applications. CONCLUSION: With the rise in liver risks a meek struggle has been made to draw attention toward herbal therapy. Hepatoprotective constituents of said plants are expressed with chemical structures. However, for certain plants active constituents are not still isolated/purified but overall plant extract was found effective in providing protection against hepatic injury. As a future perspective, there is need to purify plant active constituents for ethnomedical rationale.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522089
[Au] Autor:Oldenburg CE; Guerin PJ; Berthé F; Grais RF; Isanaka S
[Ad] Address:Francis I. Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
[Ti] Title:Malaria and nutritional status among children with severe acute malnutrition in Niger: a prospective cohort study.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The relationship between malaria infection and nutritional status is complex and previous studies suggest malaria may increase the incidence and severity of malnutrition while malnutrition may increase the risk of malaria infection. Here, we report bi-directional associations between malaria and nutritional status among children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Methods: The present study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of uncomplicated SAM in Niger. Children between 6-59 months were enrolled and followed for 12 weeks. Malaria infection was assessed using an HRP2 rapid diagnostic test at admission and at any follow-up visit with fever. We assessed the association of 1) nutritional status at admission on malaria incidence using Cox proportional hazards regression, and 2) malaria infection at admission on nutritional recovery, weight and height gain using linear regression. Results: Of 2,399 children included in the analysis, 1,327 (55.3%) were infected with malaria at admission. Malaria incidence was 12.1 cases per 100 person-months among those without malaria infection at admission. Nutritional status at admission was not associated with malaria incidence. Children with malaria infection at admission, subsequently treated with an artemisinin based combination therapy, had increased weight gain (0.38 g/kg/day, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07 to 0.69) and reduced height gain (-0.002 mm/day, 95% CI -0.004 to -0.0008). Conclusion: Malaria infection was common among children treated for uncomplicated SAM. Malaria infection may impair height gain. Proper medical and nutritional management should be assured to prevent adverse effects of malaria infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciy207

  4 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521557
[Au] Autor:Uí Dhuibhir P; Collura N; Walsh D
[Ad] Address:a School of Nursing, Midwifery & Health Science , University College Dublin , Belfield , Dublin , Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Complete Oral Nutritional Supplements: Dietitian Preferences and Clinical Practice.
[So] Source:J Diet Suppl;:1-11, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1939-022X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oral nutritional supplements (ONS) are frequently prescribed for those at risk of malnutrition. Palatability is an important factor in long-term compliance. ONS selection is typically dietitian led, but the degree to which individual perceptions of palatability influence dietitian clinical decision making is unclear. This study aimed to explore factors that influence dietitians' ONS clinical practice, evaluate dietitian hedonic preferences and overall impression of specific ONS products, and study phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) sensitivity in relation to ONS hedonic ratings. Dietitians were recruited from six urban teaching hospitals. They completed a 10-item Clinical Practices Questionnaire prior to taste testing five samples of three ONS products. A 7-point hedonic Likert scale recorded ONS palatability ratings. A PTC test was conducted. Thirty-one dietitians were recruited. Nutritional value, patient palatability, patient acceptability, tolerance and hospital contracts were the factors identified as most likely to influence ONS prescription. All ONS were consistently highly rated for overall impression. The high-protein ONS was most highly rated for all hedonic characteristics. Taste was the highest rated hedonic characteristic across all products. No statistically significant relationship was found between PTC sensitivity and ONS overall impression. The key drivers of ONS dietitian clinical practice were identified. ONS hedonic characteristics and overall impression were highly rated, which suggested this range of products had wide appeal for dietetic professionals. The taste and consistency of the ONS were rated better than other hedonic characteristics (appearance, smell, aftertaste).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/19390211.2018.1428260

  5 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521074
[Au] Autor:Zabrocka E; Wojtukiewicz MZ; Sierko E
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients in hospice.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;27(2):283-289, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Advanced cancer patients in hospice are at notably increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) due to age, local and distal advancement of the malignancy and bed confinement, among other factors. Asymptomatic VTE prevalence among palliative care patients has been found to reach 50%, whereas the clinically overt form occurs in 10%. Hospice patients are frequently given medications increasing VTE risk, for instance megestrol which is a drug commonly used in cancer cachexia. Many of the available guidelines encourage the implementation of thromboprophylaxis (TPX) in cancer patients, e.g., in the perioperative period or over the course of chemotherapy. However, concerning patients remaining under hospice care where the priority goal is not life extension but assurance of the best possible quality of life (QoL), the main benefit from the TPX would be a decrease in the risk of symptom burden associated with VTE, i.e., pain, edema or dyspnea. Nevertheless, studies performed on a sufficiently large study group, which could unequivocally determine the influence of anticoagulation on VTE symptom burden in hospice patients, are still lacking. VTE prophylaxis is challenging for many reasons: its unknown effect on QoL, vague risk of its discontinuation, and risk of bleeding complications which is additionally increased in conditions prevalent in hospice population, i.e., malnutrition, renal or liver insufficiency. So far, most of the guidelines issued by oncological societies do not precisely refer to the problem of TPX in hospice patients. Therefore, the decisions on the implementation of anticoagulation should be taken individually, with previous assessment of VTE risk, comorbidities and possible hemorrhagic complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/64593

  6 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520082
[Au] Autor:Preis E; Franz K; Siegert E; Makowka A; March C; Riemekasten G; Cereda E; Norman K
[Ad] Address:Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie und klinische Immunologie, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Title:The impact of malnutrition on quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis.
[So] Source:Eur J Clin Nutr;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5640
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to investigate the prevalence of malnutrition in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and its impact on their quality of life (QoL). SUBJECTS/METHODS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with SSc underwent clinical evaluation and were screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST). Malnutrition was defined as MUST score ≥2.To investigate QoL, all patients completed the Short Form 36 Questionnaire and the Scleroderma Health Assessment Questionnaire. The data were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics by using χ /Fisher's test, Mann-Whitney U test, correlation, and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients were included in this study (mean age was 59.1 ± 13.8 years, 90.7% women). The prevalence of malnutrition was 10.9%. Age and disease duration were not significantly different between malnourished and well-nourished patients. All QoL scores (except bodily pain and self-reported health) were significantly impaired in malnourished patients. Furthermore, the Scleroderma Health Assessment Score score which assesses disease-specific QoL was significantly higher in the malnourished patients (1.6 ± 0.73 compared to 0.91 ± 0.61 in well-nourished patients; p = 0.001), reflecting a lower QoL due to disease-specific impairments. CONCLUSIONS: Severe malnutrition in SSc patients is associated with reduced QoL. Standardized nutritional screening should routinely be conducted to identify the risk of malnutrition in order to enable an intervention with multimodal treatment and avoid the serious consequences associated with severe malnutrition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41430-018-0116-z

  7 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518784
[Au] Autor:Furuta C; Murakami H
[Ti] Title:A Novel Concept of Amino Acid Supplementation to Improve the Growth of Young Malnourished Male Rats.
[So] Source:Ann Nutr Metab;72(3):231-240, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9697
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUNDS/AIMS: This study was aimed at understanding the relationship between plasma amino acids and protein malnutrition and at determining whether amino acid supplementation associated with malnutrition and growth improves linear growth in growing rats. METHODS: Body length and plasma amino acids were measured in young male rats that were fed the following diet for 3 weeks, mimicking a low and imbalanced protein diets based on maize, a major staple consumed in developing countries: a 70% calorically restricted cornmeal-based diet (C), C + micronutrients (CM), CM + casein (CMC), CM + soy protein (CMS) or CMS + 0.3% lysine. RESULTS: A correlation analysis of linear growth and plasma amino acids indicated that lysine, tryptophan, branched-chain amino acids, methionine, and phenylalanine significantly correlated with body length. Supplementation with these 5 amino acids (AA1) significantly improved the body length in rats compared to CMC treatment whereas, nitrogen-balanced amino acid supplemented controls (AA2) did not (CM +1.2 ± 0.2, CMC +2.7 ± 0.3, CMS +2.1 ± 0.3, AA1 +2.8 ± 0.2, and AA2 +2.5 ± 0.3 cm). CONCLUSION: With securing proper amino acid balance, supplementing growth-related amino acids is more effective in improving linear growth in malnourished growing male rats. Analysis of the correlation between plasma amino acids and growth represents a powerful tool to determine candidate amino acids for supplementation to prevent malnutrition. This technology is adaptable to children in developing countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000487603

  8 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518765
[Au] Autor:James WPT
[Ti] Title:From Treating Childhood Malnutrition to Public Health Nutrition.
[So] Source:Ann Nutr Metab;72(3):202-209, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9697
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This analysis sets out an overview of an IUNS presentation of a European clinician's assessment of the challenges of coping with immediate critical clinical problems and how to use metabolic and a mechanistic understanding of disease when developing nutritional policies. SUMMARY: Critically ill malnourished children prove very sensitive to both mineral and general nutritional overload, but after careful metabolic control they can cope with a high-quality, energy-rich diet provided their initial lactase deficiency and intestinal atrophy are taken into account. Detailed intestinal perfusion studies also showed that gastroenteritis can be combatted by multiple frequent glucose/saline feeds, which has saved millions of lives. However, persisting pancreatic islet cell damage may explain our findings of pandemic rates of adult diabetes in Asia, the Middle East and Mexico and perhaps elsewhere including Africa and Latin America. These handicaps together with the magnitude of epigenetic changes emphasized the importance of a whole life course approach to nutritional policy making. Whole body calorimetric analyses of energy requirements allowed a complete revision of estimates for world food needs and detailed clinical experience showed the value of redefining stunting and wasting in childhood and the value of BMI for classifying appropriate adult weights, underweight and obesity. Lithium tracer studies of dietary salt sources should also dictate priorities in population salt-reduction strategies. Metabolic and clinical studies combined with meticulous measures of population dietary intakes now suggest the need for far more radical steps to lower the dietary goals for both free sugars and total dietary fat unencumbered by flawed cohort studies that neglect not only dietary errors but also the intrinsic inter-individual differences in metabolic responses to most nutrients. Key Messages: Detailed clinical and metabolic analyses of physiological responses combined with rigorous dietary and preferably biomarker of mechanistic pathways should underpin a new approach not only to clinical care but also to the development of more radical nutritional policies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000487273

  9 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505479
[Au] Autor:Iroh Tam PY; Wiens MO; Kabakyenga J; Kiwanuka J; Kumbakumba E; Moschovis PP
[Ad] Address:Malawi-Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, Blantyre, Malawi.
[Ti] Title:Pneumonia in HIV-Exposed and Infected Children and Association with Malnutrition.
[So] Source:Pediatr Infect Dis J;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0987
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We evaluated the association between HIV exposed-uninfected (HEU) status, malnutrition, and risk of death in Ugandan children hospitalized with pneumonia. Both HIV exposure and infection were associated with lower anthropometric indices on univariate analysis, and mid-upper arm circumference was significantly associated with overall mortality (OR 0.96) in a multivariable model. HIV infection (OR 5.0) but not HEU status was associated with overall mortality. Malnutrition may contribute to poor pneumonia outcomes among HIV-infected and HEU children requiring hospitalization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000001971

  10 / 46241 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300430
[Au] Autor:Damião R; Meneguci J; da Silva Santos Á; Matijasevich A; Rossi Menezes P
[Ad] Address:Renata Damião, Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, Av. Tutunas, 490, CEP: 38061-500, Uberaba, MG, Brazil, Tel.: + 55 34 3700-6603, E-mail addresses:damiaorenata@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Nutritional Risk and Quality of Life in Community-Dwelling Elderly: A Cross-Sectional Study.
[So] Source:J Nutr Health Aging;22(1):111-116, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1760-4788
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between nutritional risk and quality of life in community-dwelling elderly. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of individuals aged 60 years or older living in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais was conducted. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and quality of life was determined using the WHOQOL-bref and WHOQOL-old. The absolute and relative frequency distributions for each domain were calculated, and chi-square tests were used to examine the association between nutritional risk and quality of life (dichotomous variables). Poisson regression was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: 789 (27.9%) of the 2823 elderly patients in the sample were at nutritional risk. The risk of malnutrition was associated with the physical, environment, psychological, sensory abilities, social participation and intimacy domains of quality of life [(PR= 1.42, 95%CI 1.23-1.63); (PR= 1.28, 95%CI 1.12-1.47); (PR= 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36); (PR= 1.36, 95%CI 1.20-1.54); (PR= 1.29, 95%CI 1.13-1.46); (PR= 1.14, 95%CI 1.01-1.29); respectively]. CONCLUSION: The present findings contribute to the understanding of nutritional risk, and support the association between quality of life and nutritional status. These factors should be considered in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of nutritional disorders, and may contribute to the prevention and reduction of nutritional risk in this especially vulnerable population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12603-017-0935-y


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