Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Maxillary and Fractures [Words]
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[PMID]: 29521754
[Au] Autor:Emodi O; Nseir S; Shilo D; Srouji H; Rachmiel A
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rambam Health Care Campus.
[Ti] Title:Antral Wall Approach for Reconstruction of Orbital Floor Fractures Using Anterior Maxillary Sinus Bone Grafts.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Isolated orbital wall fractures account for 4% to 16% of all facial fractures. Even a modest change in the position of the bony walls can have a significant impact on orbital volume and globe position. Alloplastic materials or autogenous bone grafts such as the antral maxillary wall can be used to reconstruct small- to medium-size orbital fractures. The main advantage of an antral wall graft is the intraoral approach with minimal morbidity. Nine patients underwent repair of orbital floor fractures using the extraoral and the intraoral antral wall approach. The patients underwent preoperative computed tomography imaging and a minimum of 1 year follow-up. The size of the defects ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 cm. Two patients experienced minor immediate postoperative complications; infraorbital hypoesthesia. On follow-ups, none of our patients suffered from ocular movement restrictions or complications regarding the maxillary antral wall approach. The use of harvested bone grafts from the anterolateral wall of the maxillary sinus is a promising approach for the reconstruction of small- to mid-size orbital floor defects with minimal complications and excellent cosmetic and functional results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004454

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[PMID]: 29521750
[Au] Autor:Hwang K; Wu X; Kim H; Kang YH
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic Surgery.
[Ti] Title:Localization of the Maxillary Ostium in Relation to the Reduction of Depressed Nasomaxillary Fractures.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise location of the maxillary ostium using computed tomography for the reduction of depressed nasomaxillary fractures.Computed tomography images (61 males, 42 females; age range, 3-97 years) were analyzed. Coronal sections were cut every 3 mm.The primary maxillary ostium (PMO) was located 24.7%  3.9% of bizygomatic distance (BZD) lateral to septum. The horizontal distance of the PMO significantly increased with age (P = 0.032). The PMO was located 53.3%  8.0% of nasal length (NL) above superior surface of the palatal bone (SP). The vertical-to-horizontal ratio of the PMO decreased with age (P = 0.013). The PMO was located 30.3  4.3 mm posterior to the tip of nasal bone. The PMO was located 24.6  4.8 mm posterior to the anterior nasal spine (ANS). The ANS-PMO distance significantly increased with age (P = 0.027). The hiatus semilunaris (HS) was located 11.9%  3.2% of BZD lateral to septum. The HS was located 62.4%  10.3% of NL above SP. The vertical distance of the HS significantly decreased with age (P = 0.019). The accessory maxillary ostium (AMO) was located 14.9%  2.8% of BZD lateral to septum. The horizontal distance of the AMO significantly increased with age (P = 0.027). The AMO was located 44.8%  6.9% of NL above SP. The vertical distance of the AMO significantly decreased with age (P < 0.001). The vertical-to-horizontal ratio of the AMO decreased with age (P < 0.001).The distances of the ostium from surgical landmarks measured in this study might be helpful when inserting a small curved elevator into the maxillary ostium in the reduction of medial maxillary fractures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004449

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[PMID]: 29509311
[Au] Autor:Pollaris E; Haspeslagh M; Van den Wyngaert G; Vlaminck L
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Large Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 8920, Merelbeke, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Equine cheek teeth occlusal fissures: prevalence, association with dental wear abnormalities and occlusal angles.
[So] Source:Equine Vet J;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2042-3306
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fissures of the occlusal surface of equine cheek teeth are commonly encountered during oral examination but their aetiology is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of occlusal fissures in cadaver teeth. It is hypothesised that their prevalence is influenced by masticatory forces. Consequently, their possible association with wear disorders and occlusal angles were examined. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: The dental abnormalities and occlusal fissure findings in the cheek teeth of 143 cadaver heads were recorded. The cheek teeth occlusal angles were measured using the stiff-hinge technique. Multiple regression analyses were performed to establish possible relationships between age, sex, dental wear, occlusal angle and fissure prevalence. RESULTS: Occlusal fissures were found in 103/143 (72%) heads. Sex and age were determining factors in the prevalence of fissures. A similar prevalence was found in mandibular (54.1%) and maxillary teeth (45.9%, OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.95 - 1.29, p = 0.2). Mandibular fissures were more commonly located on the buccal aspect (OR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.16 - 1.65, p < 0.001) whereas for maxillary fissures there was no difference in prevalence between palatal and buccal aspects (OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 0.97 - 1.46, p = 0.1). Two main fissure types were identified. Type 1a fissures were the most prevalent type (39.5%). No significant correlation was found between the presence of wear abnormalities or the occlusal angle of cheek teeth, and the prevalence of fissures. MAIN LIMITATIONS: No dental histories were available. CONCLUSION: Equine cheek teeth show a high prevalence of occlusal fissures. Despite some evidence of predilection sites on the tooth surface that might indicate a mechanical aetiology for these lesions, no associations were found with wear abnormalities or occlusal angles of affected cheek teeth. Further histological and ultrastructural studies are warranted to elucidate their aetiology and possible role in other dental diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/evj.12828

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[PMID]: 29194270
[Au] Autor:Emodi O; Wolff A; Srouji H; Bahouth H; Noy D; Abu El Naaj I; Rachmiel A
[Ad] Address:The Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rambam Medical Centre.
[Ti] Title:Trend and Demographic Characteristics of Maxillofacial Fractures in Level I Trauma Center.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;29(2):471-475, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern and treatment of craniomaxillofacial injuries in the northern part of Israel, within a Jewish majority and large Arab minority population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A 5-year retrospective study evaluated patients treated for craniomaxillofacial fractures. Fracture cause, type, site, and patient demographics were evaluated. RESULTS: Patient age ranged from 1 to 94 years with an average age of 36.7 years; 52% of the victims were Jews and 48% Arabs. There was male predilection in both sectors (78.3% vs 21.7%). The main site of injury was the zygomatic bone (33.5%) followed by nasal bone, orbital, mandible, frontal sinus, and maxillary fractures. The main etiology of injuries was falls (45.4%) with significantly more falls reported by females (52.1% vs 43.2% in males). Motor vehicle accidents caused injuries more frequent in males. Arabs experienced CMF fractures at a younger age compared to Jews (27.8 and 44.8 average age, respectively). In the elderly, the trend reversed where Jews were more prone to craniomaxillofacial fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to their weight in the population, the Arab sector experiences more craniomaxillofacial injuries. The Jewish elderly population tends to reside in nursing homes where they are more susceptible to accidental falls, whereas young Arab males are more exposed to motor vehicle accidents and interpersonal violence. Falls were the main cause of injuries particularly in women. This may reflect the women's fear of reporting domestic violence. We believe that increased government investments in infrastructures and education will lower the incidence of craniomaxillofacial trauma and balance the gap between both sectors and sexes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004128

  5 / 3981 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489576
[Au] Autor:Cho HM; Kim HM; Hwang K
[Ad] Address:Department of Trauma Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital Trauma Center, Pusan.
[Ti] Title:A Reduction Technique for Depressed Medial Maxillary Fractures.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The authors developed a technique for reducing the fractured segment by introducing an elevator through the accessory maxillary ostium (AMO).Through an upper gingivolabial vestibular incision, the fractured segments were exposed. In cases where no cleft was available for inserting the elevator, the blunt end of a Cottle elevator was inserted into the AMO via a nasal approach. The curved blunt end of a Cottle elevator was inserted into the middle meatus and the AMO was felt at the medial wall of the maxillary sinus. With gentle pressure, the tip was pushed into the maxillary sinus, and then pushed forward about 2 cm. An upward force was applied until the depressed segment was reduced to its original position. Through a gingivolabial vestibular incision, alignment of the reduced segments could be seen. Miniplate fixation can be applied. If the reduced segments are stable or too many segments are present, the fracture can be stabilized using tissue glue.The authors propose that in medial maxillary fractures where no cleft for the elevator is available, the fractured segment can be mobilized by introducing an elevator through the AMO.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004413

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[PMID]: 29480233
[Au] Autor:Bai L; Li L; Su K; Bleyer A; Zhang Y; Ji P
[Ad] Address:College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:3D reconstruction images of cone beam computed tomography applied to maxillofacial fractures: A case study and mini review.
[So] Source:J Xray Sci Technol;26(1):115-123, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9114
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Maxillofacial injuries can be complex and are clinically important due to their functional and cosmetic significance. Maltreated and missed fractures might cause deformity of the face; thus, accurate evaluation of the fracture provided by X-ray images is critical. In this study, we explore the application of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for diagnosis of severe maxillofacial traumas. A patient with a complex fracture that affects the maxilla, mandible, wall of the maxillary sinus, zygoma, zygomatic arch and nasal bone was diagnosed using 3D reconstruction of CBCT images. This diagnostic approach provides detailed information obtained by static images and a systematic model with unique advantages for the following pre-surgical evaluation, surgical treatment and prognostic assessment of complex maxillofacial fractures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3233/XST-17342

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[PMID]: 29254306
[Au] Autor:Lin Q; Hong XY; Zhang D; Jin HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.
[Ti] Title:Preoperative evaluation and surgical technique of functional and cosmetic aspects in zygomatic complex fracture patients.
[So] Source:J Biol Regul Homeost Agents;31(4):1005-1012, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0393-974X
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The zygomatico-maxillary complex functions as the principle buttress of the face and is the cornerstone to an individuals aesthetic appearance. Its fracture not only creates cosmetic deformities owing to its position and facial contour, but can also cause disruption of ocular and mandibular functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality, efficacy and impact of internal fixation of zygomatic complex fractures on functional and cosmetic outcomes. A prospective study was carried out on 100 patients who were divided according to the classification and the severity of injury. Subjective evaluation was submitted based on the patients perception of signs and symptoms in the preoperative and postoperative periods. Intraoperative and postoperative assessment of bone reduction quality was made according to the type of the fracture and related difficulties; also, the difference between these groups was observed as functional and esthetic outcome. To optimize the treatment of zygomatic bone fractures, a pre-designed questionnaire was used for subjective evaluation of symptoms and treatment outcome. In 70% of cases, ophthalmologic consultation was taken and was most common in type VII fractures (100% cases). Neurosensory disturbance was the most common finding (60%), followed by diplopia (56R%), pain upon mouth opening (54%) and malar depression (50%). Out of all possible 400 fracture sites in 100 patients of zygomatic complex fractures, 266 (66.5%) fractures were detected by clinical examination, in contrast to 330 (82.5%) on radiological examination, which were highest at zygomatic-maxillary buttress (93%) followed by infraorbital rim (91%) and almost equal among fronto-zygomatic site (72%) and zygomatic arch (74%). The scores from the questionnaire for annoyance were significantly higher for paraesthesia (23%) than for trismus (10%), pain (8.5%), or deformity (8.25%). Residual deformity and pain significantly influenced the total satisfaction. Conclusively, there are many treatment modalities available for zygomatic complex fractures, and the preferred methods should be selected on the basis of fracture type, fracture severity, pre-operative signs and symptoms. Regarding the requirements of fracture site exposure and actual fixation, one priority should be to minimize postoperative complications, morbidity and residual deformities.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fracture Fixation, Internal/methods
Postoperative Complications/physiopathology
Surgery, Plastic/methods
Zygoma/surgery
Zygomatic Fractures/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological
Diplopia/etiology
Diplopia/pathology
Diplopia/physiopathology
Diplopia/psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain/etiology
Pain/pathology
Pain/physiopathology
Pain/psychology
Paresthesia/etiology
Paresthesia/pathology
Paresthesia/physiopathology
Paresthesia/psychology
Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications/pathology
Postoperative Complications/psychology
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
Trismus/etiology
Trismus/pathology
Trismus/physiopathology
Trismus/psychology
Zygoma/injuries
Zygoma/physiopathology
Zygomatic Fractures/pathology
Zygomatic Fractures/physiopathology
Zygomatic Fractures/psychology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29288602
[Au] Autor:Antikainen A; Patinen P; Pkkil J; Tjderhane L; Anttonen V
[Ad] Address:Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
[Ti] Title:The types and management of dental trauma during military service in Finland.
[So] Source:Dent Traumatol;, 2017 Dec 30.
[Is] ISSN:1600-9657
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: All Finnish males must attend compulsory military service that lasts from 6months to 1year. About 25000 males (approximately 80% of each age cohort) and 400 volunteer females complete the service annually. The aim of the study was to investigate the types of dental trauma occurring among Finnish conscripts during their military service. The article also focused on how dental traumas are treated in the Finnish Defence Forces. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All dental records in the Defence Forces' patient register concerning dental trauma during the years 2011 and 2012 were analysed by tooth number, treatment procedures and number of visits. RESULTS: According to the patient register, 361 conscripts suffered an oral trauma during their military service; thus, the average annual incidence was 7.2 trauma per 1000 conscripts. A total of 483 teeth were traumatized in the 2-year period. The most frequently traumatized teeth were the maxillary central incisors (61%), and the most common findings were enamel or enamel-dentin fractures (63% of all findings). Severe trauma was ere not common, and the most severe ones occurred during off-duty hours. The most common treatment was direct filling (n=189 patients). Only 53 patients had soft tissue injuries (bruises, wounds). Among patients with dental trauma, the mean number of visits to the Defence Forces' dental clinic was 1.9. Great variation exists in recording findings concerning dental and oral trauma. CONCLUSION: Minor trauma is common. In all cases, recording trauma and treatments should be performed carefully.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/edt.12380

  9 / 3981 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459185
[Au] Autor:Kauke M; Safi AF; Timmer M; Nickenig HJ; Zller J; Kreppel M
[Ad] Address:Department for Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Plastic Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
[Ti] Title:FAMI Screws for Mandibulo-Maxillary fixation in mandibular fracture treatment - Clinico-radiological evaluation.
[So] Source:J Craniomaxillofac Surg;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4119
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mandibulo-maxillary fixation (MMF) is indispensable for mandibular fracture treatment. Various means for MMF have been proposed, of which arch bars are widely considered to be the mainstay. However, disadvantages to this method have initiated a quest for an alternative, leading to the introduction of MMF screws. MMF screws have frequently been criticized for poor stability of fracture sites, root damage, hardware failure, and nerve damage. We retrospectively evaluate the FAMI (Fixation and Adaptation in Mandibular Injuries) screw in mandibular fracture treatment by scanning for clinically and radiologically visible complications. In total, 534 FAMI screws were used in the successful treatment of 96 males and 34 females. Condylar fractures were most commonly encountered, representing 120 of 241 fracture sites. 15 general fracture-related complications occurred, with the most common being nerve function impairment (3.8%) and postoperative malocclusion (4.6%). In nine cases (7%), clinically visible FAMI-screw-related complications occurred, with the most prevalent being screw loosening (2.3%) and mucosal signs of inflammation (3.1%). Duration of FAMI screws was associated with the occurrence of clinically visible complications (p=0.042). Radiologically, clinically invisible dental hard tissue damage was noted in 21 individuals (16%). Therefore, FAMI screws seem to be a reliable and safe method for mandibulo-maxillary fixation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29330599
[Au] Autor:El-Anwar MW; Sweed AH
[Ad] Address:Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Infraorbital foramen localization in orbitozygomatic fractures: a CT study with intraoperative finding.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(3):809-813, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the infraorbital foramen (IOF) using CT in patients with Zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) fractures (midface fracture). PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective study was carried out on 49 patients had ZMC fractures (98 sides) and 27 patients (54 sides) with craniomaxillofacial fractures rather than fractured ZMC as a control. Using CT, position of IOF was documented on 3D view in relation to inferior orbital rim, tooth root relation and finally with a novel imaginary line passing between anterior nasal spine and whitnall tubercle. RESULTS: Position of IOF had fixed anatomical landmark: just lateral to a line drawn between the anterior nasal spine to whitnall tubercle (clinically between nasal tip-lateral canthal ligament) and lateral to vertical plane to root of maxillary canine also with variable distance from inferior orbital rim ranged from 4.56 to 18.03mm with a mean of 7.9 2.447mm. CONCLUSION: Even though ZMC fractures disturb the anatomical location of the ZMC bones, there are still preserved reliable fixed landmarks maxillofacial surgeons can depend on to identify and preserve ION.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4867-x


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