Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29515741
[Au] Autor:Gueddari W; Sabri H; Chabah M
[Ad] Address:Service d'Accueil des Urgences Pédiatriques, Hôpital d'Enfants Abderrahim Harouchi, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Ibn Rochd, Casablanca, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Infections à méningocoque lors de purpura fébrile chez l'enfant dans un hôpital marocain: incidence et facteurs cliniques associés. [Meningococcal infections associated with febrile purpura among children hospitalized in a Moroccan Hospital: incidence and associated clinical factors].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:123, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Febrile purpura (FP) is suggestive of meningococcal disease, requiring almost always further investigations and a treatment based on broad spectrum antibiotics. This study aimed to determine the incidence of meningococcal infections as well as their associated clinical signs in children with febrile purpura hospitalized in the emergency department. Methods: We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study in the pediatric emergency department at the Children's Hospital of Casablanca over a period of 3 years. The hospitalized children with FP who had undergone bloodculture, whether or not associated with lumbar puncture, were included in the study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v.16 software. Results: We enrolled 96 children, 49 boys and 47 girls. The average age was 53.3 ± 40.5 months. Mean body temperature was 38.9°C. Meningococcal infection was diagnosed in 35/96 children. The diagnosis of meningococcemia was retained in 22 children, associated with meningitis in four patients. Symptoms and physical signs significantly associated with meningococcal infection included lethargy (p = 0.04), convulsions (p = 0.01) and purpura occurring outside the skin area drained by the superior vena cava (p = 0.01). Conclusion: FP occurring outside the skin area drained by the superior vena cava or associated with convulsions is srongly related to meningococcal infection, whose incidence seems to be high among Moroccan children.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.123.6089

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[PMID]: 29501881
[Au] Autor:Eto SF; Fernandes DC; Moraes AC; Prado EJR; Baldassi AC; Manrique WG; Silva IC; Medeiros ASR; Belo MAA; Balbuena TS; Samara SI; Pizauro JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Technology, School of Agrarian and Veterinary Sciences, Sao Paulo State University (Unesp), Via Prof. Paulo Donato Castellane, km 05, Jaboticabal, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: silasetoigy@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Validation of IgY for the diagnosis of Streptococcus agalactiae-caused endocarditis and bacterial meningitis in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).
[So] Source:Fish Shellfish Immunol;76:153-160, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Streptococcus agalactiae (Sta), which belongs to Lancefield group B, causes sepsis, endocarditis and bacterial meningitis in human neonates and Nile tilapia. Because the pathophysiology of Sta infection is partially similar in both species, the identification of biomarkers for the diagnosis and study of this disease is of importance for human and animal health. Therefore, in the present study, we produced an immunoglobulin Y (IgY) by immunizing laying hens with Sta proteins and evaluated its ability to detect Sta in paraffinized tilapia brain and cardiac tissue by direct immunofluorescence (IMF) and indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). The IgY produced was effective in the diagnosis of Sta infection in Nile tilapia, justifying the use of this species as a biomodel for the study of this disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 58444 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29410025
[Au] Autor:Vijayakumar S; S BA; Kanthan K; Veeraraghavan B
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Whole-genome shotgun sequences of seven colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from bacteraemia.
[So] Source:J Glob Antimicrob Resist;12:155-156, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:2213-7173
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen responsible for various infections, including bloodstream infections, meningitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia. It is resistant to most antimicrobial agents, including colistin, and the development of colistin-resistant A. baumannii is of serious concern in the hospital setting. In this study, the whole-genome shotgun sequences of seven colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates from bloodstream infections were characterised. METHODS: Colistin susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution. Whole genomes of all seven isolates were sequenced using an Ion Torrent™ PGM platform with 400-bp chemistry. RESULTS: All seven isolates were confirmed to be resistant to colistin, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 8µg/mL to 64µg/mL. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were present. The mcr1-5 genes were absent in all seven isolates. Chromosomal mutations that could be responsible for colistin resistance were observed. Six isolates belonged to ST848 and one isolate belonged to ST451. CONCLUSION: Increased colistin resistance among clinical isolates of A. baumannii is alarming. Several mutations that could be responsible for colistin resistance were observed in all seven isolates. However, the significant contribution of these mutations requires further confirmation. However, genome information for these colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates will be helpful for further comparative analysis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29269053
[Au] Autor:Veeraraghavan B; Lal B; Devanga Ragupathi NK; Neeravi IR; Jeyaraman R; Varghese R; Paul MM; Baskaran A; Ranjan R
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632004, India. Electronic address: vbalaji@cmcvellore.ac.in.
[Ti] Title:First genome report on novel sequence types of Neisseria meningitidis: ST12777 and ST12778.
[So] Source:J Glob Antimicrob Resist;12:117-118, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:2213-7173
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Neisseria meningitidis is an important causative agent of meningitis and/or sepsis with high morbidity and mortality. Baseline genome data on N. meningitidis, especially from developing countries such as India, are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the whole genome sequences of N. meningitidis isolates from a tertiary care centre in India. METHODS: Whole-genome sequencing was performed using an Ion Torrent™ Personal Genome Machine™ (PGM) with 400-bp chemistry. Data were assembled de novo using SPAdes Genome Assembler v.5.0.0.0. Sequence annotation was performed through PATRIC, RAST and the NCBI PGAAP server. Downstream analysis of the isolates was performed using the Center for Genomic Epidemiology databases for antimicrobial resistance genes and sequence types. Virulence factors and CRISPR were analysed using the PubMLST database and CRISPRFinder, respectively. RESULTS: This study reports the whole genome shotgun sequences of eight N. meningitidis isolates from bloodstream infections. The genome data revealed two novel sequence types (ST12777 and ST12778), along with ST11, ST437 and ST6928. The virulence profile of the isolates matched their sequence types. All isolates were negative for plasmid-mediated resistance genes. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ST11 and ST437 N. meningitidis isolates in India along with two novel sequence types (ST12777 and ST12778). These results indicate that the sequence types circulating in India are diverse and require continuous monitoring. Further studies strengthening the genome data on N. meningitidis are required to understand the prevalence, spread, exact resistance and virulence mechanisms along with serotypes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29181530
[Au] Autor:Pappas A; Adams-Chapman I; Shankaran S; McDonald SA; Stoll BJ; Laptook AR; Carlo WA; Van Meurs KP; Hintz SR; Carlson MD; Brumbaugh JE; Walsh MC; Wyckoff MH; Das A; Higgins RD; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.
[Ti] Title:Neurodevelopmental and Behavioral Outcomes in Extremely Premature Neonates With Ventriculomegaly in the Absence of Periventricular-Intraventricular Hemorrhage.
[So] Source:JAMA Pediatr;172(1):32-42, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6211
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Studies of cranial ultrasonography and early childhood outcomes among cohorts of extremely preterm neonates have linked periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic periventricular leukomalacia with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, the association between nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly and neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes is not fully understood. Objective: To characterize the outcomes of extremely preterm neonates younger than 27 weeks' gestational age who experienced nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly that was detected prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. Design, Setting, and Participants: This longitudinal observational study was conducted at 16 centers of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. Infants born prior to 27 weeks' gestational age in any network facility between July 1, 2006, and June 30, 2011, were included if they had a cranial ultrasonogram performed prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. Comparisons were made between those with ventriculomegaly and those with normal cranial sonograms. Data analysis was completed from August 2013 to August 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was neurodevelopmental impairment, defined as a Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III cognitive score less than 70, moderate/severe cerebral palsy, a Gross Motor Function Classification System score of level 2 or more, vision impairment, or hearing impairment. Secondary outcomes included Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III subscores, components of neurodevelopmental impairment, behavioral outcomes, and death/neurodevelopmental impairment. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of ventriculomegaly with adverse outcomes while controlling for potentially confounding variables and center differences as a random effect. Linear regression was used similarly for continuous outcomes. Results: Of 4193 neonates with ultrasonography data, 300 had nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly (7%); 3045 had normal cranial ultrasonograms (73%), 775 had periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage (18.5%), and 73 had cystic periventricular leukomalacia (1.7%). Outcomes were available for 3008 of 3345 neonates with ventriculomegaly or normal scans (90%). Compared with normal cranial ultrasonograms, ventriculomegaly was associated with lower gestational age, male sex, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, late-onset sepsis, meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and stage 3 retinopathy of prematurity. After adjustment, neonates with ventriculomegaly had higher odds of neurodevelopmental impairment (odds ratio [OR], 3.07; 95% CI, 2.13-4.43), cognitive impairment (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.09-4.99), moderate/severe cerebral palsy (OR, 3.68; 95% CI, 2.08-6.51), death/neurodevelopmental impairment (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.62-2.91), but not death alone (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.76-1.57). Behavioral outcomes did not differ. Conclusions and Relevance: Nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly is associated with increased odds of neurodevelopmental impairment among extremely preterm neonates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.3545

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[PMID]: 29524300
[Au] Autor:Lee S; Lee SO; Kim GL; Rhee DK
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Estrogen receptor-ß of microglia underlies sexual differentiation of neuronal protection via ginsenosides in mice brain.
[So] Source:CNS Neurosci Ther;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1755-5949
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in acute bacterial meningitis can lead to widespread brain damage and mortality. Inflammatory responses by immune cells in the brain are thought to determine the degree of brain injury. Yet, the mechanisms underlying host responses to pneumococcal meningitis are largely unknown. To explore host responses as a potential therapeutic target for preventing brain injury after pneumococcal meningitis. METHODS: We evaluated signaling mechanisms that minimize neuronal damage caused by pneumococcal infection; specifically, we assessed pathways related to neuronal survival after enhancing estrogen receptor-ß (ER-ß) expression using a natural therapeutic substance known as ginsenoside Rb1 and Rg3 enhanced ginseng. RESULTS: Tissue damage caused by bacterial infection was reduced in Rb1/Rg3-treated mice as a result of microglial activation and the inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, Rb1 upregulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as anti-apoptotic factors including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Using BV2 microglial cells in vitro, Rb1 treatment inhibited microglial apoptosis in a manner associated with JAK2/STAT5 phosphorylation. CONCLUSION: After S. pneumoniae infection in mice, particularly in female mice, Rb1-containing ginseng increased bacterial clearance and survival. These findings inform our understanding of the host immune response to pneumococcal meningitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/cns.12842

  7 / 58444 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524198
[Au] Autor:Khan F; Khan MA; Ahmed N; Khan MI; Bashir H; Tahir S; Zafar AU
[Ad] Address:Centre of Excellence in Molecular Biology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. faidadkhan@cemb.edu.pk.
[Ti] Title:Molecular Characterization of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A (PspA), Serotype Distribution and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated from Pakistan.
[So] Source:Infect Dis Ther;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2193-8229
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pakistan has one of the highest burdens of pneumococcal diseases in the world, but unfortunately studies in this demanding research area are limited in the region. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is the next generation pneumococcal vaccine candidate as the protein locates on the Streptococcus pneumoniae surface. Its gene, pspA, might be encoded by all pneumococci, and the protein has proven immunogenicity. The molecular characterization of PspA, pneumococcal serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility are important for regional diversity studies. METHODS: In this study, we examined 38 pneumococcal isolates from pneumococcal diseased (pneumonia/meningitis) patients blood or cerebrospinal fluid. There were no specific inclusion or exclusion criteria, but all the individuals [ages 1 month to 12 years (male/female)] had undergone no antibiotic treatment in at least the past 3 months and had no vaccination history. We investigated the serotype distribution, antibiotic susceptibility, prevalence of the PspA family and its active domain's fusion, expression and antigenicity. RESULTS: Our finding shows that serotype 19F is the most prevalent (23.6%) followed by 18B (15.78%) (non-vaccine type) in all isolated pneumococcal strains. All strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and linezolid, while 80% were resistant to gentamycin. Genotyping revealed that ~ 80% (N = 31/38) of pneumococcal strains produce PspA belonging to family 2 and clade 3. We further selected three active domains of PspA (family 2 and clade 3) by in silico analysis, merged together into a fusion gene for expression study, and its antigenicity was analyzed by Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Serotypes 19F and 18B (non-vaccine type) are the most prevalent in the Pakistani pneumococcal isolates. The PspA family 2 proteins produced by Pakistani pneumococcal isolates have high sequence homologies with each other and differ from those produced by strains isolated in the rest of the world. The PspA fusion peptide had a proven antigenic response in western blotting, with no considerable correlation among pneumococcal serotypes, antibiotic susceptibility and PspA family/clade distribution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40121-018-0195-0

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[PMID]: 29523423
[Au] Autor:Bertin N; Brosolo G; Pistola F; Pelizzo F; Marini C; Pertoldi F; Vriz O
[Ad] Address:Emergency Department, San Antonio Hospital, San Daniele del Friuli, Udine, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Capnocytophaga canimorsus: An Emerging Pathogen in Immunocompetent Patients-Experience from an Emergency Department.
[So] Source:J Emerg Med;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:0736-4679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterium of the normal oral flora of dogs and cats. Human infection is caused by animal bite but is rarely observed, mainly in immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of C. canimorsus infection that occurred in immunocompetent patients and caused multiorgan failure and in both cases severe neurologic involvement. CASE REPORT: In the first case, we present a 69-year-old immunocompetent woman with septic shock derived from skin and soft tissue infection after a dog's bite. She developed ischemic necrosis evolving to gangrene of both forefeet and hands, infective aortic endocarditis, and neurologic involvement caused by large hemispheric hypodense lesions compatible with ischemic septical lesions. In the second case, we present a 65-year-old immunocompetent man with meningitis after a dog's bite. Despite antibiotic therapy, he developed neurologic clinical deterioration, with right sensitive hemisyndrome associated with lack of strength and motor skills of the right hand. Radiologic findings were consistent with the diagnosis of cerebritis. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Clinicians should always be aware of this pathogen, both in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, and consider prophylactic antibiotics after exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29523004
[Au] Autor:Pschibul A; Janzarik WG; Franck P; Hufnagel M; Beck C; Korinthenberg R
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuropediatrics and Muscle Disorders, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Cystic Encephalomalacia following Vasculopathy and Vasospasm of Proximal Intracranial Arteries Due to Pneumococcal Meningitis in a Infant.
[So] Source:Neuropediatrics;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1439-1899
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite the availability of modern antibiotics, pneumococcal meningitis in both children and adults remains a severe disease-one known to frequently cause grave complications and residual disability. Although the appearance of arterial vasospasms in bacterial meningitis systematically has been investigated and reported on for adult patients, such research is lacking when it comes to infants. We report on a 4-week-old infant who, 6 days after onset of pneumococcal meningitis, suffered severe neurological deterioration with treatment-resistant seizures and coma. Generalized cortical and subcortical edema developed in conjunction with diminished cerebral blood flow, as depicted in magnetic resonance angiography and serial Doppler-sonographic examinations. The ischemia resulted in extensive cystic encephalomalacia. We propose that the degree of variation in cerebral blood flow in the acute phase was the result of an extensive arterial vasculopathy involving vasospasms. Awareness of this complication and prospective serial Doppler-sonographic examinations may improve our understanding of the connection between brain edema and vasculopathy. At present, however, no effective treatment appears available.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0038-1635075

  10 / 58444 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522662
[Au] Autor:Andrysiak -Mamos E; Zochowska E; Kazmierczyk -Puchalska A; Sagan L; Sowinska -Przepiera E; Zajac -Marczewska M; Kojder I; Syrenicz A
[Ti] Title:Cerebrospinal meningitis in a 30 -year -old patient as first manifestation of pituitary macroadenoma.
[So] Source:Pomeranian J Life Sci;61(4):403-10, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2450-4637
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: The most common clinical and neurological signs and symptoms of pituitary macroadenomas include headache, vision impairment and cranial nerve palsy. Case report: The patient presented in this article was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at regional hospital; at admission, the patient was unconscious, he had convulsions and spasms, and a 3 -day history of headache and body temperature up to 41.5°C. The patient with suspected neuroinfection was transferred to the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin (PMU), where cerebrospinal meningitis of bacterial etiology was established based on cerebrospinal fluid investigations and the presence of pituitary abscess was suggested based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Magnetic resonance imaging findings included an extensive pathological lesion with the diameter of 27 × 28 × 38 mm located in the sellar-suprasellar region, with intensive peripheral contrast enhancement. The lesion protrudes into the sphenoid sinus through the lowered bottom of sella turcica and the fluid content has also been visualized in the sphenoid sinus. After 10 -day antibiotic therapy, the patient was transferred to neurosurgery ward for surgical treatment. The pathological lesion was partially evacuated during right frontotemporal craniotomy. The patient's general condition after the surgery was moderately severe; the patient was conscious, able to follow simple commands, presenting hemiparesis of the left side of the body, particularly affecting left lower limb and with speech disturbances. The signs of hypopituitarism affecting all hormonal axes were also observed and the patient was transferred to the Department of Endocrinology of the PMU for further treatment. Follow -up MRI scan continued to show the presence of pathological mass in the sellar -suprasellar region, which penetrated into the sphenoid sinus through damaged sellar bottom. After correction of reduced hormone levels and several weeks of antibiotic therapy, the patient was transferred to the Department of Neurosurgery of the PMU for further surgical treatment. Transsphenoidal resection of the sellar -suprasellar tumor and sphenoid sinus reconstruction were performed. Histopathology report confirmed the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma. The patient in relatively good condition, with partial hemiparesis on the left side of the body, able to stand with support, not able to walk, with speech disturbances and able to follow commands was transferred to the rehabilitation center. One year later, follow- -up MRI scan showed deepened sella turcica, filled with a mass corresponding to postoperative material. No evidence of disease progression has been found. Conclusion: Neuroinfection may be the first manifestation of pituitary macroadenoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process


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