Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Mesembryanthemum [Words]
References found : 271 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 28 go to page                         

  1 / 271 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29043030
[Au] Autor:Yu K; D'Odorico P; Carr DE; Personius A; Collins SL
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleVAUSA.
[Ti] Title:The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass.
[So] Source:Ecol Evol;7(19):7739-7749, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2045-7758
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C grass that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to which water stress, nutrients, and competition affect nocturnal carboxylation in . High nutrient and low water conditions favored over , in contrast to high water conditions. While low water conditions induced nocturnal carboxylation in 9-week-old individuals of , in these low water treatments, a 66% reduction in nutrient applied over the entire experiment did not further enhance nocturnal carboxylation. In high water conditions both alone and in association with did not perform nocturnal carboxylation, regardless of the nutrient levels. Thus, nocturnal carboxylation in was restricted by strong competition with in high water conditions. This study provides empirical evidence of the competitive advantage of facultative CAM plants over grasses in drought conditions and of the restricted ability of to use their photosynthetic plasticity (i.e., ability to switch to CAM behavior) to compete with grasses in well-watered conditions. We suggest that a high drought tolerance could explain the increased dominance of facultative CAM plants in a future environment with increased drought and nitrogen deposition, while the potential of facultative CAM plants such as to expand to wet environments is expected to be limited.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ece3.3296

  2 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29017432
[Au] Autor:Nishijima T; Furuhashi M; Sakaoka S; Morikami A; Tsukagoshi H
[Ad] Address:a Faculty of Agriculture , Meijo University , Tempaku-ku, Nagoya , Japan.
[Ti] Title:Ectopic expression of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum sodium transporter McHKT2 provides salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.
[So] Source:Biosci Biotechnol Biochem;81(11):2139-2144, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1347-6947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most plants do not tolerate highly saline environments; the development of salt stress tolerance is crucial for improving crop yield. An efficient way of finding genes involved in salt tolerance is to study and use data from halophytes. In this study, we used the Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) expression data-set and selected for further study the gene McHKT2, which encodes for the Arabidopsis sodium transporter ortholog AtHKT1. In comparison with the HKT1 amino acid sequences from other plants, McHKT2 has several unique features. It seems to be localized to the plasma membrane, and its overexpression confers strong salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results indicate that McHKT2 is a suitable candidate protein that can induce salt tolerance in non-halophytes. Like McHKT2, using transcriptome data-sets from halophytes such as ice plant give us an efficiency way to obtain new gene resources that might involve in plant salt tolerance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/09168451.2017.1383847

  3 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28994299
[Au] Autor:Raak C; Molsberger F; Pittermann W; Bertram M; Robens S; Ostermann T
[Ad] Address:Institute of Integrative Medicine, Witten-Herdecke University, Herdecke, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Use of the Bovine Udder Skin model to evaluate the tolerability of Mesem cosmetic cream.
[So] Source:Altern Lab Anim;45(4):191-200, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0261-1929
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Observational studies of Mesem cream (based on Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. plant extract) found that it had positive effects on skin hydration and smoothing of the skin. However, some patients reported skin irritation effects. The current study evaluated the skin tolerability of Mesem cream, as compared to the carrier cream (without the active ingredient), by using the isolated perfused bovine udder skin model. The primary outcomes investigated were cytotoxicity (i.e. cell viability), assessed with the MTT assay, and irritancy and inflammation, assessed by measuring PGE2 tissue levels. A total reaction score was calculated by combining the results for each parameter. In the case of a single topical application, significant differences were found between the carrier cream and the Mesem cream. While the application of carrier cream resulted in low cytotoxicity (-8.4% change in viability, as compared to the untreated control), the Mesem cream was more cytotoxic (-18.7% change). In addition, one hour after application, PGE2 levels were higher in Mesem cream-treated skin, as compared to carrier cream-treated skin (16.6% versus 11.3%). Further experiments (tape-stripped skin and repeated application) also found significant differences between the two creams in the results obtained. Evaluation of the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of phyto-cosmetic products is important. Our results confirmed the findings of two previous human observational studies (the human patch test and open application study). Future experiments to understand the underlying principles of its effectiveness, safety and tolerability should include extracts of M. crystallinum L. juice, as well as the Mesem cream itself.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28822907
[Au] Autor:Taybi T; Cushman JC; Borland AM
[Ad] Address:School of Natural & Environmental Sciences, Ridley Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. Electronic address: Tahar.Taybi@ncl.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Leaf carbohydrates influence transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation in the facultative CAM plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.
[So] Source:J Plant Physiol;218:144-154, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1618-1328
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nocturnal degradation of transitory starch is a limiting factor for the optimal function of crassulacean acid metabolism and must be coordinated with phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)-mediated CO uptake to optimise carbon gain over the diel cycle. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nocturnal carboxylation is coordinated with starch degradation in CAM via a mechanism whereby the products of these pathways regulate diel transcript abundance and enzyme activities for both processes. To test this hypothesis, a starch and CAM-deficient mutant of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was compared with wild type plants under well-watered and saline (CAM-inducing) conditions. Exposure to salinity increased the transcript abundance of genes required for nocturnal carboxylation, starch and sucrose degradation in both wild type and mutant, but the transcript abundance of several of these genes was not sustained over the dark period in the low-carbohydrate, CAM-deficient mutant. The diel pattern of transcript abundance for PEPC mirrored that of PEPC protein, as did the transcripts, protein, and activity of chloroplastic starch phosphorylase in both wild type and mutant, suggesting robust diel coordination of these metabolic processes. Activities of several amylase isoforms were low or lacking in the mutant, whilst the activity of a cytosolic isoform of starch phosphorylase was significantly elevated, indicating contrasting modes of metabolic regulation for the hydrolytic and phosphorylytic routes of starch degradation. Externally supplied sucrose resulted in an increase in nocturnal transcript abundance of genes required for nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation. These results demonstrate that carbohydrates impact on transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation in CAM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28794903
[Au] Autor:Saleh MY; Sarhan MS; Mourad EF; Hamza MA; Abbas MT; Othman AA; Youssef HH; Morsi AT; Youssef GH; El-Tahan M; Amer WA; Fayez M; Ruppel S; Hegazi NA
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, 12613 Giza, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:A novel plant-based-sea water culture media for cultivation and recovery of the halophyte microbiome.
[So] Source:J Adv Res;8(6):577-590, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2090-1232
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The plant-based-sea water culture medium is introduced to cultivation and recovery of the microbiome of halophytes. The ice plant ( ) was used, in the form of juice and/or dehydrated plant powder packed in teabags, to supplement the natural sea water. The resulting culture medium enjoys the combinations of plant materials as rich source of nutrients and sea water exercising the required salt stress. As such without any supplements, the culture medium was sufficient and efficient to support very good growth of halotolerant bacteria. It was also capable to recover their culturable populations in the phyllosphere, ecto-rhizosphere and endo-rhizosphere of halophytes prevailing in Lake Mariout, Egypt. When related to the total bacterial numbers measured for roots by quantitative-PCR, the proposed culture medium increased culturability (15.3-19.5%) compared to the conventional chemically-synthetic culture medium supplemented with (11.2%) or without (3.8%) NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, representative isolates of halotolerant bacteria prevailed on such culture medium were closely related to spp., spp., and spp. Seed germination tests on 25-50% sea water agar indicated positive interaction of such bacterial isolates with the germination and seedlings' growth of barley seeds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171118
[Lr] Last revision date:171118
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jare.2017.06.007

  6 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28401290
[Au] Autor:Yu K; D'Odorico P; Li W; He Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904, USA. ky9hc@virginia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Effects of competition on induction of crassulacean acid metabolism in a facultative CAM plant.
[So] Source:Oecologia;184(2):351-361, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Abiotic drivers of environmental stress have been found to induce CAM expression (nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM species such as Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The role played by biotic factors such as competition with non-CAM species in affecting CAM expression, however, remains largely understudied. This research investigated the effects of salt and water conditions on the competition between M. crystallinum and the C grass Bromus mollis with which it is found to coexist in California's coastal grasslands. We also investigated the extent to which CAM expression in M. crystallinum was affected by the intensity of the competition with B. mollis. We found that M. crystallinum had a competitive advantage over B. mollis in drought and saline conditions, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum in access to light and soil nutrients in high water conditions. This strong competitive effect even outweighed the favorable effects of salt or water additions in increasing the biomass and productivity of M. crystallinum in mixture. Regardless of salt conditions, M. crystallinum did not switch to CAM photosynthesis in response to this strong competitive effect from B. mollis. Disturbance (i.e., grass cutting) reduced the competitive pressure by B. mollis and allowed for CAM expression in M. crystallinum when it was grown mixed with B. mollis. We suggest that moderate competition with other functional groups can enhance CAM expression in M. crystallinum, thereby affecting its plasticity and ability to cope with biological stress.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mesembryanthemum/metabolism
Photosynthesis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: California
Plants
Sodium Chloride
Stress, Physiological
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:451W47IQ8X (Sodium Chloride)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171012
[Lr] Last revision date:171012
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-017-3868-6

  7 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28400837
[Au] Autor:Choi JH; Jo SG; Jung SK; Park WT; Kim KY; Park YW; Park JH
[Ad] Address:Laboratory Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 PLUS Project Team, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Immunomodulatory effects of ethanol extract of germinated ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum).
[So] Source:Lab Anim Res;33(1):32-39, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1738-6055
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory activity of ice plant ( ) extract (IPE) and . Raji (a human B cell line) and Jurkat (a human T cell line) cells were treated with various doses of IPE and cell proliferation was measured by WST assay. Results showed that IPE promoted the proliferation of both Raji and Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner. IPE also enhanced IL-6 and TNF-α production in macrophages in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), although IPE alone did not induce cytokine production. Moreover, IPE treatment upregulated iNOS gene expression in macrophages in a time- and dose-dependent manner and led to the production of nitric oxide in macrophages in the presence of IFNγ. studies revealed that oral administration of IPE for 2 weeks increased the differentiation of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells in splenocytes. These findings suggested that IPE has immunomodulatory effects and could be developed as an immunomodulatory supplement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5625/lar.2017.33.1.32

  8 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28367156
[Au] Autor:He J; Qin L; Chong EL; Choong TW; Lee SK
[Ad] Address:National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University Singapore, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:Plant Growth and Photosynthetic Characteristics of Grown Aeroponically under Different Blue- and Red-LEDs.
[So] Source:Front Plant Sci;8:361, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-462X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:is a succulent, facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant. Plant growth and photosynthetic characteristics were studied when plants were grown indoor under light emitting diodes (LED)-lighting with adequate water supply. Plants were cultured aeroponically for a 16-h photoperiod at an equal photosynthetic photon flux density of 350 µmol m s under different red:blue LED ratios: (1) 100:0 (0B); (2) 90:10 (10B); (3) 80:20 (20B); (4) 70:30 (30B); (5) 50:50 (50B); and (6)100:0 (100B). grown under 10B condition had the highest shoot and root biomass and shoot/root ratio while those grown under 0B condition exhibited the lowest values. Compared to plants grown under 0B condition, all other plants had similar but higher total chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoids (Car) contents and higher Chl / ratios. However, there were no significant differences in Chl/Car ratio among all plants grown under different red- and blue-LEDs. Photosynthetic light use efficiency measured by photochemical quenching, non-photochemical quenching, and electron transport rate, demonstrated that plants grown under high blue-LED utilized more light energy and had more effective heat dissipation mechanism compared to plants grown under 0B or lower blue-LED. Statistically, there were no differences in photosynthetic O evolution rate, light-saturated CO assimilation rate ( ), and light-saturated stomatal conductance ( ) among plants grown under different combined red- and blue-LEDs but they were significantly higher than those of 0B plants. No statistically differences in total reduced nitrogen content were found among all plants. For the total soluble protein, all plants grown under different combined red- and blue-LEDs had similar values but they were significantly higher than that of plants grown under 0B condition. However, plants grown under higher blue-LEDs had significant higher ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) protein than those plants grown under lower blue-LED. High and but very low CAM acidity of all plants during light period, imply that this facultative CAM plant performed C photosynthesis when supplied with adequate water. Results of this study suggest that compared to red- or blue-LED alone, appropriate combination of red- and blue-LED lighting enhanced plant growth and photosynthetic capacities of .
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fpls.2017.00361

  9 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27810674
[Au] Autor:Percey WJ; Shabala L; Wu Q; Su N; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM; Bose J; Shabala S
[Ad] Address:School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Potassium retention in leaf mesophyll as an element of salinity tissue tolerance in halophytes.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;109:346-354, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soil salinity remains a major threat to global food security, and the progress in crop breeding for salinity stress tolerance may be achieved only by pyramiding key traits mediating plant adaptive responses to high amounts of dissolved salts in the rhizosphere. This task may be facilitated by studying natural variation in salinity tolerance among plant species and, specifically, exploring mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytes. The aim of this work was to establish the causal link between mesophyll ion transport activity and plant salt tolerance in a range of evolutionary contrasting halophyte and glycophyte species. Plants were grown under saline conditions in a glasshouse, followed by assessing their growth and photosynthetic performance. In a parallel set of experiments, net K and H transport across leaf mesophyll and their modulation by light were studied in control and salt-treated mesophyll segments using vibrating non-invasive ion selective microelectrode (the MIFE) technique. The reported results show that mesophyll cells in glycophyte species loses 2-6 fold more K compared with their halophyte counterparts. This decline was reflected in a reduced maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, chlorophyll content and growth observed in the glasshouse experiments. In addition to reduced K efflux, the more tolerant species also exhibited reduced H efflux, which is interpreted as an energy-saving strategy allowing more resources to be redirected towards plant growth. It is concluded that the ability of mesophyll to retain K without a need to activate plasma membrane H -ATPase is an essential component of salinity tolerance in halophytes and halophytic crop plants.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Potassium/metabolism
Salt-Tolerant Plants/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aizoaceae/metabolism
Beta vulgaris/metabolism
Chenopodium quinoa/metabolism
Chlorophyll/metabolism
Mesembryanthemum/metabolism
Mesophyll Cells/metabolism
Photosynthesis
Plant Leaves/metabolism
Salinity
Salt-Tolerance/physiology
Species Specificity
Vicia faba/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:1406-65-1 (Chlorophyll); RWP5GA015D (Potassium)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170410
[Lr] Last revision date:170410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161105
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 271 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27806052
[Au] Autor:Guiducci L; Razghandi K; Bertinetti L; Turcaud S; Rüggeberg M; Weaver JC; Fratzl P; Burgert I; Dunlop JW
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Honeycomb Actuators Inspired by the Unfolding of Ice Plant Seed Capsules.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(11):e0163506, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plant hydro-actuated systems provide a rich source of inspiration for designing autonomously morphing devices. One such example, the pentagonal ice plant seed capsule, achieves complex mechanical actuation which is critically dependent on its hierarchical organization. The functional core of this actuation system involves the controlled expansion of a highly swellable cellulosic layer, which is surrounded by a non-swellable honeycomb framework. In this work, we extract the design principles behind the unfolding of the ice plant seed capsules, and use two different approaches to develop autonomously deforming honeycomb devices as a proof of concept. By combining swelling experiments with analytical and finite element modelling, we elucidate the role of each design parameter on the actuation of the prototypes. Through these approaches, we demonstrate potential pathways to design/develop/construct autonomously morphing systems by tailoring and amplifying the initial material's response to external stimuli through simple geometric design of the system at two different length scales.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mesembryanthemum
Seeds
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Algorithms
Mechanical Phenomena
Mesembryanthemum/physiology
Models, Theoretical
Polymers
Seeds/anatomy & histology
Seeds/chemistry
Seeds/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Polymers)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170626
[Lr] Last revision date:170626
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0163506


page 1 of 28 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information