Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Mesenteric and Lymphadenitis [Words]
References found : 659 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 66 go to page                         

  1 / 659 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29504348
[Au] Autor:Zafar S; Tariq MU; Ahmed Z
[Ad] Address:Human Molecular Genetic Laboratory, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Baluchistan, Quetta, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Ectopic Enterobius Vermicularis Infestation; An Extremely Rare Cause Of Mesenteric Lymphadenopathy Mimicking Tuberculous Lymphadenitis.
[So] Source:J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad;30(1):124-126, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1819-2718
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enterobius vermicularis (EV) is a pinworm which commonly resides in the lumen of the intestinal tract and lays eggs on the perianal skin. However, rarely the worm can infest various other sites in the body and cases with infestation of such ectopic sites have been reported in literature. Rare cases of mesenteric lymph node involvement have also been reported. We report a case in a young male who presented with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis. During surgery, enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes were identified. Histological examination revealed adult worm in the appendiceal lumen. Histological examination of mesenteric lymph node revealed degenerated worm surrounded by caseating chronic granulomatous inflammation. We conclude that EV infestation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of enlarged mesenteric lymph node with chronic granulomatous inflammation, especially in young patients and when accompanying bowel tissue also reveal the helminth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29474145
[Au] Autor:Li C; Gölz G; Alter T; Barac A; Hertwig S; Riedel C
[Ad] Address:1 Institute of Food Safety and Food Hygiene, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany (ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8359-3862 [C.R.]).
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica in Retail Seafood.
[So] Source:J Food Prot;:497-501, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1944-9097
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Yersinia enterocolitica is a zoonotic enteropathogenic bacterium that can cause acute gastroenteritis and mesenteric lymphadenitis. Although Y. enterocolitica is common in animals, food, and the environment, the reservoirs and transmission routes of this pathogen are still not fully understood. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in seafood in Germany, because only limited data are available on that topic. Seafood samples were purchased from retail shops in Berlin, Germany and examined for the presence of Y. enterocolitica by cold enrichment followed by cultivation on selective agar. Presumptive Y. enterocolitica isolates were analyzed by biotyping, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The total prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in seafood samples was 2.7% (6 of 220 samples). Mussel (2 of 90), shrimp (1 of 89), and cephalopod (3 of 41) samples were positive for Y. enterocolitica. Three isolates were identified as serotype O:8, one was identified as serotype O:5,27, and two samples did not belong to any investigated serotypes. The presence of the virulence-associated genes ail, inv, and ystB was studied by multiplex PCR. Four of the six isolates contained inv and ystB, one produced no positive results for the analyzed genes, and one contained only ystB. All Y. enterocolitica isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime, cefuroxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim. Resistance was observed to cephalothin (83.3% of isolates), amoxicillin (83.3%), and ampicillin (50.0%). This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of Y. enterocolitica in retail seafood in Germany. The prevalence found in these seafood samples was comparatively low, and all isolates belonged to biotype 1A. However, seafood contaminated with Y. enterocolitica may pose a risk to consumer health because the pathogenic potential of biotype 1A strains is still being debated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-17-357

  3 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28913615
[Au] Autor:Benetti C; Conficconi E; Hamitaga F; Wyttenbach M; Lava SAG; Milani GP; Bianchetti MG; Simonetti GD; Helbling R
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Department of Southern Switzerland, San Giovanni Hospital, 6500, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Course of acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis: single-center experience.
[So] Source:Eur J Pediatr;, 2017 Sep 14.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1076
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Available reports dealing with acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis do not address the total duration of symptoms. However, it is commonly assumed a time for recovery ≤ 4 weeks. The purpose of this report was to investigate the course of acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis in childhood. A review was made of the patients aged ≤ 16 years in whom the diagnosis of acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis was established between 2011 and 2015 at the Pediatric Emergency Unit. The records of the Pediatric Emergency Unit, those of the referring family doctors, and the results of a structured telephone interview with each family were used. Forty-four patients (25 girls and 19 boys) aged 2.5 to 16, median 8.2, years were included. A bimodal distribution in duration of symptoms was observed: symptoms persisted for ≤ 2 weeks in 22 patients and 3 to 10 weeks in 22. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were similar in children with symptoms persisting for 2 weeks or less 28 and in those with symptoms persisting for 3-10 weeks. CONCLUSION: In patients affected with acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis, it is advantageous to think of the time span for recovery in terms of ≥ 4 weeks. What is Known: • Mesenteric adenitis is a self-limiting inflammatory condition with well-characterized clinical presentation and imaging features. • A total duration of symptoms of ≤ 4 weeks is usually hypothesized. What is New: • Symptoms persist for 3 to 10 weeks in half of the patients. • At presentation, clinical and laboratory characteristics are similar in children with symptoms persisting for 2 weeks or less and in those with 45 symptoms persisting for 3-10 weeks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170915
[Lr] Last revision date:170915
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00431-017-3010-0

  4 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28764185
[Au] Autor:Pandey V; Khatib Y; Pandey R; Khade AL; Khare M
[Ad] Address:Ex-Registrar, Department of Pathology, HBT Medical College and Dr. R.N. Cooper Hospital, Juhu, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
[Ti] Title:Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease Masquerading as Acute Appendicitis.
[So] Source:J Clin Diagn Res;11(6):ED26-ED28, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2249-782X
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease (KFD) is a self-limiting necrotizing lymphadenitis that usually presents with fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Recognition of this condition is crucial, because it can be mistaken for tuberculosis, lymphoma and connective tissue disorders. When present at an unusual location the diagnosis can be challenging. We present an unusual case of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease involving mesenteric lymph node masquerading as acute appendicitis along with its differential diagnosis. A 30-year-old female presented with complaints of acute abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. Physical examination revealed rebound tenderness in the right iliac fossa. The abdominal sonography was suspicious of acute appendicitis. The patient underwent appendectomy with excision of an enlarged mesenteric lymph node. On histopathology mesenteric node showed features of KFD which was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. Appendix was unremarkable. Although rare KFD should be added to the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, Awareness of this disorder helps to prevent misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170804
[Lr] Last revision date:170804
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7860/JCDR/2017/27733.10142

  5 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28660130
[Au] Autor:Chizinga M; Schiliro D; Mullin B; Barrie R
[Ad] Address:Yale University, School of Medicine, Yale-Waterbury Residency Program (Department of Internal Medicine), United States.
[Ti] Title:Mesenteric lymphadenitis as a presenting feature of Whipple's disease.
[So] Source:IDCases;9:50-52, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2214-2509
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Detecting Whipple's disease, a "great imitator", requires a high index of suspicion so that antimicrobial treatment can be initiated in a timely manner; a missed diagnosis can be fatal. Although an uncommon cause, Whipple's disease must be considered in adults with mesenteric lymphadenitis. We report the case of a 39-year-old African American man who presented with chronic joint pain, chronic weight loss, and acute onset epigastric pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed extensive mesenteric lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Whipple's disease was made based upon demonstration of PAS-positive macrophages in the mesenteric lymph node and duodenal biopsies. Antimicrobial therapy resulted in weight gain and resolution of abdominal pain and arthralgia at six months follow-up. Whipple's disease can be fatal without antibacterial therapy and it always needs to be considered in individuals presenting with any combination of abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhea in the background of nonspecific arthritis or arthralgia. Whipple's disease must also be considered in adults presenting with mesenteric lymphadenitis. Review of CT scans may be helpful, as Whipple's disease characteristically causes low attenuation mesenteric lymphadenopathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.idcr.2017.06.002

  6 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28567110
[Au] Autor:Agarwal P; Kumar V; Kaushal M; Kumari M; Chaudhary A
[Ad] Address:Address: Department of Pathology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr. RML Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Indian visceral leishmaniasis with extensive lymphadenopathy - An unusual presentation: A case report with literature review.
[So] Source:Cytojournal;14:9, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1742-6413
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, is a life-threatening systemic disease caused by the obligate intracellular protozoan, , and transmitted to humans by the female phlebotomine sand fly ( ). The disease is fatal, if left untreated. We report a case of a patient clinically suspected of disseminated tuberculosis, but fine needle aspiration cytology of cervical and axillary lymph nodes yielded a diagnosis of leishmaniasis. Diagnosis of VL was challenging as the disease closely mimicked tuberculosis in the setting of extensive lymphadenopathy including conglomerate of mesenteric lymph nodes, on and off fever, and granulomatous lymphadenitis on aspiration. Bone marrow examination was further performed. A detailed workup revealed patient to be severely immunocompromised and newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive. Worldwide, India has the largest number of VL cases, accounting for 40%-50% of world's disease burden and the second largest HIV-infected population, accounting for approximately 10% of the global disease burden. HIV increases the risk of developing VL by 100-2320 times in endemic areas and concurrently VL promotes the clinical progression of HIV disease. Co-infection with HIV alters the body's immune response to leishmaniasis thus leading to unusual presentations. This case highlights the diagnostic problem in the aforesaid setting. Moreover, co-infection with HIV in VL can be a potential source of drug resistance. An early diagnosis and intensified treatment is the key to patient management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/1742-6413.205312

  7 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28325157
[Au] Autor:Atema JJ; Vrouenraets BC
[Ad] Address:OLVG West, afd. Chirurgie, Amsterdam.
[Ti] Title:Een kleuter met pijn rechts onderin de buik. [A preschooler with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant].
[So] Source:Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd;161(0):D802, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1876-8784
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:dut
[Ab] Abstract:A 5-year-old boy with acute abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant and fever underwent open appendectomy following clinical observation and serial equivocal ultrasound. During exploration we encountered a normal-looking appendix but multiple enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, suggestive of mesenteric lymphadenitis. The boy had an uneventful postoperative course and recovered completely.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170322
[Lr] Last revision date:170322
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28261620
[Au] Autor:Helbling R; Conficconi E; Wyttenbach M; Benetti C; Simonetti GD; Bianchetti MG; Hamitaga F; Lava SA; Fossali EF; Milani GP
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Department of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Acute Nonspecific Mesenteric Lymphadenitis: More Than "No Need for Surgery".
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2017:9784565, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute nonspecific, or primary, mesenteric lymphadenitis is a self-limiting inflammatory condition affecting the mesenteric lymph nodes, whose presentation mimics appendicitis or intussusception. It typically occurs in children, adolescents, and young adults. White blood count and C-reactive protein are of limited usefulness in distinguishing between patients with and without mesenteric lymphadenitis. Ultrasonography, the mainstay of diagnosis, discloses 3 or more mesenteric lymph nodes with a short-axis diameter of 8 mm or more without any identifiable underlying inflammatory process. Once the diagnosis is established, supportive care including hydration and pain medication is advised. Furthermore, it is crucial to reassure patients and families by explaining the condition and stating that affected patients recover completely without residuals within 2-4 weeks.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/diagnosis
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdomen/diagnostic imaging
Acetaminophen/therapeutic use
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use
Appendicitis
C-Reactive Protein/chemistry
Child
Female
Fever
Humans
Inflammation
Leukocyte Count
Lymph Nodes/pathology
Male
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 362O9ITL9D (Acetaminophen); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170404
[Lr] Last revision date:170404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170307
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/9784565

  9 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28260763
[Au] Autor:Begum A; Baten MA; Begum Z; Alam MM; Ahsan MM; Ansari NP; Zahan S; Khan MK; Nesa F; Huq MM
[Ad] Address:Dr Ambia Begum, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, CBMCB, Mymensingh, Bangladesh.
[Ti] Title:A Retrospective Histopathological Study on Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis in Mymensingh.
[So] Source:Mymensingh Med J;26(1):104-108, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1022-4742
[Cp] Country of publication:Bangladesh
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tuberculosis is a very common disease in our country. This retrospective histopathological study was designed to assess the distribution of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) in various organs through examination of biopsy specimens. A total of 216 specimens were diagnosed as tubercular lesion by histopathological evaluation in the Department of pathology, Community Based Medical College and a private laboratory during the period from January 2014 to December 2014. Mean age of the case was 32 years. Majority of the cases were female (126 out of 216). Lymph nodes were the most common site of EPTB (62.96%) followed by skin and subcutaneous tissue (17.59%), intestine (11.11%), breast (2.77%), female genital tract (2.31%), male genital tract (1.38%), bone and joint (1.85%). Out of 136 cases of tubercular lymphadenitis, 96(70.58%) were cervical, 18(13.23%) were axillary, 12(3.82%) were mesenteric and 10(7.35%) were inguinal. This study reveals, in our locality, EPTB is very common in adulthood with female preponderance. Cervical lymph node is very common sites for EPTB.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170306
[Lr] Last revision date:170306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 659 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27987102
[Au] Autor:Gross I; Siedner-Weintraub Y; Stibbe S; Rekhtman D; Weiss D; Simanovsky N; Arbell D; Hashavya S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Hadassah Medical Center, Ein Kerem, Kiryat Hadassah, POB 12000, 91120, Jerusalem, Israel. itaigross@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Characteristics of mesenteric lymphadenitis in comparison with those of acute appendicitis in children.
[So] Source:Eur J Pediatr;176(2):199-205, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1076
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mesenteric lymphadenitis (ML) is considered as one of the most common alternative diagnosis in a child with suspected acute appendicitis (AA). In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with ML (n = 99) were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings to patients diagnosed with AA (n = 102). This comparison was applied for both lymph nodes smaller and larger than 10 mm. When compared to patients with AA, patients with ML had significantly longer duration of symptoms prior to emergency department (ED) presentation (2.4 ± 2.6 vs 1.4 ± 1.4 days, P = 0.002) and multiple ED presentations (1.3 ± 0.7 vs 1.05 ± 0.3, P < 0.001) and had longer duration of stay in the ED (9.2 ± 5.9 vs 5.2 ± 4 h, P < 0.001), respectively. They also had significantly lower WBC (10.16 ± 4.7 × 10 /dl vs 15.8 ± 4.4 × 10 /dl, P < 0.001) with lymphocyte predominance (24.6 ± 14 vs 13 ± 8.7%, P < 0.001) and lower CRP levels (0.48 vs 1.6 mg/dl). Migration of pain (28 vs 7%), vomiting (62 vs 34%), and classic abdominal findings of AA (72 vs 20%) were all significantly more common for children with AA. When comparing lymph node size, no significant difference was found between those presenting with small and large nodes. CONCLUSION: This study highlights multiple clinical and laboratory findings that differentiate ML and AA. Moreover, the absence of any difference with regard to the lymph nodes size might suggest that lymph nodes enlargement is a non-specific finding. What is Known : • Mesenteric lymphadenitis is a very common diagnosis in children with suspected acute appendicitis. • Despite its prevalence, only few studies addressed the clinical characteristics of this clinical entity and their comparison with acute appendicitis. What is New: • Mesenteric lymphadenitis and acute appendicitis could be differentiated by multiple clinical and laboratory parameters. • No significant difference was found between those presenting with small and large lymph nodes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Appendicitis/diagnosis
Lymph Nodes
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdominal Pain/diagnostic imaging
Abdominal Pain/etiology
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Appendicitis/complications
Appendicitis/pathology
Appendicitis/physiopathology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging
Lymph Nodes/pathology
Male
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/complications
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/pathology
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis/physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, Nonparametric
Symptom Assessment
Ultrasonography
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171006
[Lr] Last revision date:171006
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161218
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00431-016-2822-7


page 1 of 66 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information