Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Mite and Infestations [Words]
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[PMID]: 29183283
[Au] Autor:Fraser TA; Shao R; Fountain-Jones NM; Charleston M; Martin A; Whiteley P; Holme R; Carver S; Polkinghorne A
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay, Hobart, TAS, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals potential origins of the scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei infesting two iconic Australian marsupials.
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):233, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Debilitating skin infestations caused by the mite, Sarcoptes scabiei, have a profound impact on human and animal health globally. In Australia, this impact is evident across different segments of Australian society, with a growing recognition that it can contribute to rapid declines of native Australian marsupials. Cross-host transmission has been suggested to play a significant role in the epidemiology and origin of mite infestations in different species but a chronic lack of genetic resources has made further inferences difficult. To investigate the origins and molecular epidemiology of S. scabiei in Australian wildlife, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of S. scabiei from diseased wombats (Vombatus ursinus) and koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) spanning New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, and compared them with the recently sequenced mitochondrial genome sequences of S. scabiei from humans. RESULTS: We found unique S. scabiei haplotypes among individual wombat and koala hosts with high sequence similarity (99.1% - 100%). Phylogenetic analysis of near full-length mitochondrial genomes revealed three clades of S. scabiei (one human and two marsupial), with no apparent geographic or host species pattern, suggestive of multiple introductions. The availability of additional mitochondrial gene sequences also enabled a re-evaluation of a range of putative molecular markers of S. scabiei, revealing that cox1 is the most informative gene for molecular epidemiological investigations. Utilising this gene target, we provide additional evidence to support cross-host transmission between different animal hosts. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a history of parasite invasion through colonisation of Australia from hosts across the globe and the potential for cross-host transmission being a common feature of the epidemiology of this neglected pathogen. If this is the case, comparable patterns may exist elsewhere in the 'New World'. This work provides a basis for expanded molecular studies into mange epidemiology in humans and animals in Australia and other geographic regions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genome, Mitochondrial
Marsupialia/parasitology
Sarcoptes scabiei/genetics
Scabies/parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Wild/genetics
Australia/epidemiology
Base Composition/genetics
Base Sequence
Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics
Genes, Mitochondrial
Genome Size
Haplotypes/genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Annotation
Phylogeny
Scabies/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-1086-9

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[PMID]: 29392787
[Au] Autor:Becskei C; Cuppens O; Mahabir SP
[Ad] Address:Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Zoetis, Mercuriusstraat 20, Zaventem, 1930, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety of sarolaner in the treatment of canine ear mite infestation caused by Otodectes cynotis: a non-inferiority study.
[So] Source:Vet Dermatol;29(2):100-e39, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Various treatments are available for ear mite infestations in dogs. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of sarolaner was evaluated against ear mite infestation caused by Otodectes cynotis in dogs and compared with topical moxidectin/imidacloprid in a single-masked, multi-centre field study. ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs with O. cynotis infestation were treated monthly with oral sarolaner (n = 163) or topical moxidectin/imidacloprid (n = 78). METHODS: The presence of mites in the ear canals and the clinical signs associated with otoacariasis (including head shaking, pruritus/ear scratching, trauma or alopecia of the pinnae, and erythema, ulceration and debris in the ear canals) was evaluated on days 0, 14 and 30, and, if applicable, on day 60. Dogs were considered cured of mite infestation following one (on day 0) or two (on days 0 and 30) monthly treatments, if no live mites were found in either ear. Non-inferiority was evaluated at days 14 and 30. RESULTS: Parasitological cure was achieved in 76.4%, 90.5% and 93.3% of the sarolaner-treated and in 53.9%, 63.5% and 66.7% of the moxidectin/imidacloprid-treated dogs on days 14, 30 and 60, respectively. At study completion, on day 60 at the latest, parasitological cure was achieved overall in 99.4% of sarolaner-treated and 87.8% of moxidectin/imidacloprid-treated cases. The parasitological cure rate for sarolaner was non-inferior to moxidectin/imidacloprid at days 14 and 30. The clinical signs of otoacariasis improved throughout the study in both groups. There were no treatment-related adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: A single oral administration of sarolaner was safe and highly effective in the treatment of O. cynotis infestation in dogs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/vde.12521

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[PMID]: 29330449
[Au] Autor:Ziegelmann B; Abele E; Hannus S; Beitzinger M; Berg S; Rosenkranz P
[Ad] Address:University of Hohenheim, Apicultural State Institute, 70593, Stuttgart, Germany. bettina.ziegelmann@uni-hohenheim.de.
[Ti] Title:Lithium chloride effectively kills the honey bee parasite Varroa destructor by a systemic mode of action.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):683, 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Honey bees are increasingly important in the pollination of crops and wild plants. Recent reports of the weakening and periodical high losses of managed honey bee colonies have alarmed beekeeper, farmers and scientists. Infestations with the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor in combination with its associated viruses have been identified as a crucial driver of these health problems. Although yearly treatments are required to prevent collapses of honey bee colonies, the number of effective acaricides is small and no new active compounds have been registered in the past 25 years. RNAi-based methods were proposed recently as a promising new tool. However, the application of these methods according to published protocols has led to a surprising discovery. Here, we show that the lithium chloride that was used to precipitate RNA and other lithium compounds is highly effective at killing Varroa mites when fed to host bees at low millimolar concentrations. Experiments with caged bees and brood-free artificial swarms consisting of a queen and several thousand bees clearly demonstrate the potential of lithium as miticidal agent with good tolerability in worker bees providing a promising basis for the development of an effective and easy-to-apply control method for mite treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-19137-5

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[PMID]: 29489819
[Au] Autor:Ruckert A; Allen LN; Ramirez RA
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Combinations of plant water-stress and neonicotinoids can lead to secondary outbreaks of Banks grass mite (Oligonychus pratensis Banks).
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191536, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Spider mites, a cosmopolitan pest of agricultural and landscape plants, thrive under hot and dry conditions, which could become more frequent and extreme due to climate change. Recent work has shown that neonicotinoids, a widely used class of systemic insecticides that have come under scrutiny for non-target effects, can elevate spider mite populations. Both water-stress and neonicotinoids independently alter plant resistance against herbivores. Yet, the interaction between these two factors on spider mites is unclear, particularly for Banks grass mite (Oligonychus pratensis; BGM). We conducted a field study to examine the effects of water-stress (optimal irrigation = 100% estimated evapotranspiration (ET) replacement, water stress = 25% of the water provided to optimally irrigated plants) and neonicotinoid seed treatments (control, clothianidin, thiamethoxam) on resident mite populations in corn (Zea mays, hybrid KSC7112). Our field study was followed by a manipulative field cage study and a parallel greenhouse study, where we tested the effects of water-stress and neonicotinoids on BGM and plant responses. We found that water-stress and clothianidin consistently increased BGM densities, while thiamethoxam-treated plants only had this effect when plants were mature. Water-stress and BGM herbivory had a greater effect on plant defenses than neonicotinoids alone, and the combination of BGM herbivory with the two abiotic factors increased the concentration of total soluble proteins. These results suggest that spider mite outbreaks by combinations of changes in plant defenses and protein concentration are triggered by water-stress and neonicotinoids, but the severity of the infestations varies depending on the insecticide active ingredient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191536

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[PMID]: 29498895
[Au] Autor:Peltier SK; Brown JD; Ternent MA; Fenton H; Niedringhaus KD; Yabsley MJ
[Ad] Address:1 Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, 589 D.W. Brooks Drive, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.
[Ti] Title:Assays for Detection and Identification of the Causative Agent of Mange in Free-Ranging Black Bears ( Ursus americanus).
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three mite species ( Demodex ursi, Ursicoptes americanus, and Sarcoptes scabiei) have been associated with mange in black bears ( Ursus americanus). Since the early 1990s, the number and geographic distribution of mange cases in black bears in Pennsylvania has increased; however, the causative mites have yet to be completely defined. We evaluated several diagnostic approaches for detection and identification of mites in 72 black bears with severe lesions consistent with mange. Sarcoptes scabiei was morphologically identified in skin scrapes from 66 of the bears; no mites were identified in the remaining six. Histopathologic lesions consistent with sarcoptic mange were observed in 39 of 40 bear skin samples examined, and intralesional mites were observed in samples from 38 of these bears. Samples were collected from a subset of the 72 bears for PCR testing targeting both the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-2 region and cytochrome c oxidase I ( cox1) gene including 69 skin scrapes ( ITS-2 only), 56 skin biopsies ( ITS-2 and cox1), and 36 fecal samples ( ITS-2 and cox1). Skin scrapes were a more sensitive sample for PCR detection than either skin biopsies or fecal samples, and the ITS-2 primers proved more sensitive than cox1. Using a commercial indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibodies to S. scabiei were detected in 45/49 (92%) black bears with confirmed mange and 0/62 (0%) cubs with no gross lesions suggestive of mange and which were born to seronegative sows. Sarcoptes scabiei was the predominant mite associated with mange in black bears in Pennsylvania. Diagnostically, cytologic examination of skin scrapes was the most effective approach for diagnosing active mite infestations in black bears. The evaluated serologic assay accurately detected antibodies to S. scabiei in most bears with confirmed S. scabiei infestations. Additional research is needed to determine the usefulness of this approach for larger scale surveys and for asymptomatic bears.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7589/2017-06-148

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[PMID]: 29498419
[Au] Autor:Abdelfattah EM; Vezzoli G; Buczkowski G; Makagon MM
[Ad] Address:Department of Animal Science, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Essential oils: effects of application rate and modality on potential for combating northern fowl mite infestations.
[So] Source:Med Vet Entomol;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2915
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The northern fowl mite (NFM), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Mesostigmata: Macronyssidae), is the primary blood-feeding ectoparasite found on poultry in the U.S.A. Three experiments were conducted in vitro to test the acaricidal properties of cade, garlic, lavender, lemongrass, pine and thyme essential oils against NFM, and to evaluate whether these effects are altered by adjusting oil application rates and application modality (direct vs. vapour contact). Applied at the rate of 0.21 mg/cm , the essential oils of cade, thyme, lemongrass and garlic resulted in higher NFM mortality at 24 h post-application than lavender and pine oils, and the untreated and ethanol-treated controls. Cade and thyme were the most consistent and fast-acting of the essential oils in terms of toxicity to NFM. Cade applied at 0.21 mg/cm and 0.11 mg/cm and thyme applied at 0.21 mg/cm were effective in eliminating NFM within 2 h through direct contact. The modality of application did not affect the efficacy of cade and thyme essential oils. The results suggest that essential oils may be utilized as alternatives to chemical pesticides and could be used as fumigants for the control of NFM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/mve.12300

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[PMID]: 29478090
[Au] Autor:Pinto-Zevallos DM; Bezerra RHS; Souza SR; Ambrogi BG
[Ad] Address:Laboratório de Ecologia Química, Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Marechal Rondon, s/n - Jardim Rosa Elze, São Cristóvão, SE, CEP 49100-000, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Species- and density-dependent induction of volatile organic compounds by three mite species in cassava and their role in the attraction of a natural enemy.
[So] Source:Exp Appl Acarol;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1572-9702
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Upon damage by herbivores, plants induce an array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that mediate ecological interactions involving communication with organisms of the second and third trophic levels. VOC-mediated tritrophic interactions have largely been studied in various systems, including cassava (Manihot esculenta), but little is known about the chemical nature of herbivore-induced VOCs in this crop and the response they evoke in natural enemies. Several tetranychid and predatory mites are associated with cassava. Here, VOC emissions from uninfested plants and plants infested with 200 or 400 Mononychellus tanajoa, a specialist herbivore on cassava, and the generalists Tetranychus urticae and T. gloveri were measured. Dual-choice experiments were also conducted to assess the preference of inexperienced (reared on prey-infested bean plants) and experienced (adapted on prey-infested cassava plants) predatory mites, Neoseiulus idaeus (Phytoseiidae), between odors of uninfested plants versus odors of plants infested with M. tanajoa, T. urticae or T. gloveri. Two hundred individuals significantly increased the emissions of (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (E)-ß-ocimene, ß-caryophyllene, alloaromadendrene and (E)-geranyl acetone in T. urticae-infested plants, and (E)-ß-ocimene and methyl salicylate (MeSA) in T. gloveri-infested plants. Four hundred individuals significantly increased the emissions of (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, MeSA, α-pinene and D-limonene in M. tanajoa-infested plants. In addition, T. urticae at this density induced (E)-ß-ocimene, D-limonene, (E)-geranyl acetone and six compounds that were not detected in other treatments. Tetranychus gloveri-infested plants induced the emissions of (E)-2-hexenal and D-limonene. Regardless of the infesting species, inexperienced N. idaeus did not discriminate between uninfested or infested plants. Upon experience, they discriminated between the odors of uninfested and T. urticae-damaged plants. Our findings reveal that mite infestations in cassava result in density-dependent and species-specific emission of VOCs, and that N. idaeus relies on associative learning to forage for its prey.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10493-018-0231-5

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[PMID]: 29374118
[Au] Autor:Busin V
[Ad] Address:DVM, PhD, DipECSRHM, MRCVS, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, 464 Bearsden Road, Glasgow, UK.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of sheep scab in the UK: preventing the spread of resistant mites.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;182(4):104-105, 2018 01 27.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mite Infestations/prevention & control
Mites
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Psoroptidae
Sheep
Sheep Diseases/prevention & control
United Kingdom
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.k422

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[PMID]: 29405685
[Au] Autor:Porshakov AM; Yakovlev SA; Kurnyaeva AD
[Ti] Title:[Gamasid mites of small mammals in the semi-desert territories of the Saratov Trans-Volga region].
[So] Source:Parazitologiia;51(2):132-42, 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0031-1847
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The paper contains the data on the species composition and comparative analysis of gamaside mites, parasitizing on small mammals in the semi-desert territories of Saratov trans-Volga region. On the basis of the results of investigations conducted in the Aleksandrovo-Gaisky District in 2008-2013, 18 species of gamaside mites (9 genusus, 5 families) have been recorded. Nine species of maaside mites, which were not found in semi-desert zone earlier were revealed, includiding Hypoaspis (Stratiolaelaps) miles Berlese, 1882, H. (Geolaelaps) heselhausi Oudemans, 1912, H. (G.) lubrica Oudemans et Voigts, 1604, G. et. R. Canestrini, 1881, Haemogamasus citelli Bregetova et Nelzina, 1952, Hirstionyssus eusoricis Bregetova, 1956, Hi. ellobii Bregetova, 1653; five of these species are new for the territory of Saratov Province. As a result of the study of semi-desert zone of Saratov trans-Volga region and taking into account literary data, parasitic fauna of small mammals of Aleksandrovo-Gaisky District was expanded up to 21 species, and of Saratov Province, up to 44 species of gamasid mites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mite Infestations/veterinary
Mites/classification
Phylogeny
Rodent Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Arvicolinae/parasitology
Desert Climate
Grassland
Host Specificity
Mice
Mite Infestations/epidemiology
Mites/physiology
Russia/epidemiology
Sciuridae/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29458439
[Au] Autor:Hinkle NC; Jirjis F; Szewczyk E; Sun F; Flochlay-Sigognault A
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602-2603, USA.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety assessment of a water-soluble formulation of fluralaner for treatment of natural Ornithonyssus sylviarum infestations in laying hens.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):99, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago, 1877), infestations can stress birds, impairing welfare and causing substantial economic losses. A study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of an ectoparasiticide solution (fluralaner) for oral administration in the treatment of mite-infested hens. METHODS: Clinically healthy, naturally mite-infested laying hens (n = 132), approximately 32 weeks of age, were ranked by Day -9 mite vent counts and randomized among 12 study pens, each to hold one of four treatment groups. Three groups received fluralaner-medicated water by oral gavage at dose rates of 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg on Days 0 and 7; one group was an untreated control (three pens for each group). Five naturally infested untreated birds were included in each pen to act as mite-infested source birds. Thus each pen, treated and control, had six non-source birds for assessment of efficacy, plus five source birds to provide ongoing challenge. Primary efficacy assessments were based on mean O. sylviarum vent counts from non-source birds in the control and treated group pens on Days 1, 2, 6, 8, 12, 15, 19, 22 and 26. RESULTS: Source-birds maintained infestations throughout the study, validating the challenge to study birds. On Days 1 through 22, mean control group mite counts were significantly greater than those of the treated groups (P ≤ 0.013). Relative to the control group, mean O. sylviarum counts were reduced by at least 90% from Day 6 through Days 19, 22 and 22 in the fluralaner 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg groups, respectively. On Day 19, mean mite counts were lower in the 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg groups compared with the 0.25 mg/kg group (P ≤ 0.018), and in the 1.0 mg/kg compared with the 0.5 mg/kg group (P = 0.014). There were no adverse events in treated birds. CONCLUSIONS: A fluralaner solution administered twice by gavage to laying hens with a one-week between-treatment interval was safe and effective in quickly controlling O. sylviarum infestations despite continuous challenge from infested birds. By eliminating mites, this fluralaner solution has the potential to improve bird health and productivity, and to eliminate the burden of topical pesticide application.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2678-y


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