Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Mucormycosis [Words]
References found : 3930 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 393 go to page                         

  1 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512930
[Au] Autor:Kabulski GM; MacVane SH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy Services, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.
[Ti] Title:Isavuconazole Pharmacokinetics in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis Following Bilateral Orthotopic Lung Transplantation.
[So] Source:Transpl Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3062
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previous studies of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) treated with azole antifungals have shown altered pharmacokinetics relative to healthy patients. Data regarding the pharmacokinetic profile of isavuconazole in patients with CF undergoing lung transplantation is currently not available. Serum trough concentrations assessed in a single CF patient following transplant revealed significantly lower values relative to available literature. Larger studies are required to validate CF population pharmacokinetics of isavuconazole. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tid.12878

  2 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29509222
[Au] Autor:Zehani A; Smichi I; Marrakchi J; Besbes G; Haouet S; Kchir N
[Ti] Title:Agressive infection following a dental extraction in a diabetic patient :Rhinocerebral mucormycosis.
[So] Source:Tunis Med;95(5):378-380, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:0041-4131
[Cp] Country of publication:Tunisia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mucormycosis is a rare and acute fungal infection which is frequently lethal, usually observed in non-controlled diabetic patients. The infection usually begins in the nose but it can invade the lung, the digestive tract, and the skin. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis accounts for 40 to 49% of mucormycosis cases. We report the case of a 44-year-old diabetic man, presenting with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Our patient was treated by an association of amphotericin B and surgical debridement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29448830
[Au] Autor:Sayan M; Arpag H; Tokur M; Bahar AY
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Thoracic Surgery, 123647 Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University , Faculty of Medicine, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Pulmonary mucormycosis mimicking an endobronchial mass.
[So] Source:Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann;26(3):242-244, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1816-5370
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection that can infect different regions of the body. This entity may present in rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous, and disseminated forms. Although pulmonary mucormycosis is usually seen as an invasive parenchymal consolidation or cavitation, it may rarely present as an endobronchial mass. We describe a case of endobronchial mucormycosis in which the fungal mass was completely removed via rigid bronchoscopy before medical therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/0218492318760711

  4 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28458494
[Au] Autor:Sahota R; Gambhir R; Anand S; Dixit A
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Pathology, Rayat and Bahra Dental College and Hospital, Mohali.
[Ti] Title:Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis: Report of a Rare Case.
[So] Source:Ethiop J Health Sci;27(1):85-90, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2413-7170
[Cp] Country of publication:Ethiopia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mucormycosis is one of the rapidly progressing and lethal form of fungal infection which involves the nose and paranasal sinuses of the head and the neck regions. Mucormycosis also remains a threat to patients with uncontrolled diabetes or other predisposing systemic conditions. It manifests as rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous or disseminated form. The underlying conditions can influence clinical presentation and often delay diagnosis, with resultant poor outcomes. CASE DETAILS: We report a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a 75 year-old diabetic patient with emphasise on diagnosis, treatment and survival options of patient from this potentially fatal fungal infection. Extra oral examination revealed mild non-tender swelling on the face, unable to see from left eye, impaired sense of smell, difficulty in speech and nasal stuffiness. Intra-oral examination showed necrosis of mucosa and underlying bone in relation to canine to the tuberosity area of the left vestibular region of the maxilla. CONCLUSION: Timely diagnosis is critical to survival and minimization of morbidity. Institution of surgical and medical therapy is critical in maximizing the likelihood of good outcome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Mucormycosis/diagnostic imaging
Mucormycosis/drug therapy
Paranasal Sinuses/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Amphotericin B/therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Mucormycosis/surgery
Necrosis
Paranasal Sinuses/pathology
Paranasal Sinuses/surgery
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
Triazoles/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Triazoles); 6TK1G07BHZ (posaconazole); 7XU7A7DROE (Amphotericin B)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29483124
[Au] Autor:Shumilov E; Bacher U; Perske C; Mohr A; Eiffert H; Hasenkamp J; Trümper L; Wulf GG; Ströbel P; Ibrahim AS; Venkataramani V
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Medicine Göttingen (UMG), Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title: validation of the endothelial cell receptor GRP78 in a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis -Letter to the Editor- (New-Data Letter).
[So] Source:Antimicrob Agents Chemother;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1098-6596
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mucormycosis is probably the most devastating and hard to diagnose invasive mold infection caused by fungi belonging to the order Mucorales.….
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29470162
[Au] Autor:Hammer MM; Madan R; Hatabu H
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115.
[Ti] Title:Pulmonary Mucormycosis: Radiologic Features at Presentation and Over Time.
[So] Source:AJR Am J Roentgenol;:1-6, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1546-3141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary mucormycosis is an aggressive opportunistic fungal infection. We set out to evaluate the CT and MRI features of pulmonary mucormycosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Through a search of the electronic medical record from 2007 to 2017, we identified 30 patients with definite or probable mucormycosis. Two radiologists reviewed the initial chest CT examinations for the presence of features including the "reverse halo" sign, large ground-glass halo, and peripheral lesion distribution. Additional CT and MRI studies were reviewed to evaluate evolution over time. RESULTS: The majority (67%) of patients had lesions with the reverse halo sign at some point in the disease course. A ground-glass halo larger than the lesion was seen in 53% of patients. Notably, lesions had a peripheral predominance in 87% of cases. Through careful review of images, a perivascular ground-glass precursor lesion was identified in 20% of patients 1-2 weeks before a consolidation developed. In five (17%) patients, CT showed a multifocal pneumonia appearance. Finally, MRI of two patients showed T2-hypointense rims and central nonenhancement, a finding we refer to as the "black hole" sign. CONCLUSION: Large nodules or consolidations with an associated reverse halo sign or large perilesional ground-glass halos are common in mucormycosis. Lesions tend to show a peripheral predominance, and a perivascular ground-glass focus preceded nodular lesions in some cases. In some patients with severe disease, imaging features evolved to show a multifocal pneumonia pattern, and this pattern was associated with a high mortality rate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2214/AJR.17.18792

  7 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29458027
[Au] Autor:Jundt JS; Wong MEK; Tatara AM; Demian NM
[Ad] Address:Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Texas at Houston, Houston, TX. Electronic address: Jonathon.jundt@uth.tmc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Invasive Cutaneous Facial Mucormycosis in a Trauma Patient.
[So] Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5053
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mucormycosis, also known as zygomycosis, is an aggressive infection caused by a ubiquitous group of molds known as mucormycetes and is often associated with immune suppression or trauma among immunocompetent populations. We present the case of a 19-year-old woman who was involved in a motor vehicle accident in whom rapidly progressive invasive cutaneous facial mucormycosis subsequently developed. The diagnosis, treatment options, and incidence of this disease process are discussed in the context of trauma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29449166
[Au] Autor:Chen CY; Sheng WH; Tien FM; Lee PC; Huang SY; Tang JL; Tsay W; Tien HF; Hsueh PR
[Ad] Address:Division of Haematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of pulmonary invasive fungal infection among adult patients with hematological malignancy in a medical centre in Taiwan, 2008-2013.
[So] Source:J Microbiol Immunol Infect;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1995-9133
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: This study was aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of pulmonary invasive fungal infection (IFI) among patients with hematological malignancy. METHODS: All patients with hematological malignancy who were treated at a medical centre from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Pulmonary IFI was classified according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 2008 consensus. RESULTS: During the study period, 236 (11.3%) of 2083 patients with hematological malignancy were diagnosed as pulmonary IFI, including 41 (17.4%) proven, 75 (31.8%) probable, and 120 (50.8%) possible cases. Among the 116 patients of proven and probable cases of pulmonary IFI, aspergillosis alone (n = 90, 77.6%) was predominant, followed by cryptococcosis alone (n = 9, 7.8%), and mucormycosis (n = 4, 3.4%). The overall incidence of patients with pulmonary IFI was 5.9 per 100 patient-years. The highest incidence (per 100 patient-year) was found in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (13.7) followed by acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (11.3), and myelodysplastic syndrome/severe aplastic anaemia (6.7). Fourteen (5.9%) of the 236 patients with pulmonary IFI died within 12 weeks after diagnosis of pulmonary IFI. Univariate analysis revealed that elderly age (>65 years) (P = 0.034), lack of response to anti-fungal treatment (P < 0.001), and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P < 0.001) were predictors of poor prognosis. However, only admission to the ICU was an independent predictor of poor prognosis for 12-week mortality (P = 0.022) based on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome/severe aplastic anaemia were at high risk of pulmonary IFI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29437814
[Au] Autor:Sharma SK; Balasubramanian P; Radotra B; Singhal M
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, Candigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Isolated splenic mucormycosis in a case of aplastic anaemia.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mucormycosis, a rare opportunistic infection seen in immunocompromised hosts, is caused by fungi of Mucorales family. It may be confined to the organs, such as rhinocerebral and pulmonary mucormycosis, or may cause disseminated infection. A 14-year-old boy presented to our clinic with fever and left upper quadrant abdominal pain, and on evaluation was found to have pancytopaenia, and imaging revealed ill-defined splenic collection with thrombus in the splenic vein. He was started on empirical intravenous antibiotics, followed by antifungals empirically as he did not show any improvement clinically. Eventually, splenectomy was done, which on histopathological examination revealed mucormycosis. The patient finally succumbed to his illness as he developed peritonitis and refractory shock. To date, only two cases of isolated splenic mucormycosis have been reported. Aggressive treatment is needed, which includes the use of antifungals (amphotericin B) and surgical debridement or resection of the involved tissues or organs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 3930 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29432820
[Au] Autor:Fréalle E; Rocchi S; Bacus M; Bachelet H; Pasquesoone L; Tavernier B; Mathieu D; Millon L; Jeanne M
[Ad] Address:Univ. Lille, U1019 - UMR 8204 - CIIL - Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, F-59000 Lille, France; CNRS, UMR 8204, F-59000 Lille, France; Inserm, U1019, F-59000 Lille, France; CHU Lille, Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, F-59000 Lille, France; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59000 Lille, F
[Ti] Title:qPCR detection of Lichtheimia species in bandages associated with cutaneous mucormycosis in burn patients.
[So] Source:J Hosp Infect;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2939
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cutaneous mucormycoses, mainly due to Lichtheimia (Absidia), have occurred on several occasions in the Burn Unit of the University Hospital of Lille, France. AIM: To investigate the potential vector role of non-sterile bandages used to hold in place sterile gauze used for wound dressing. METHODS: Mycological analysis by conventional culture, Mucorales qPCR, and Lichtheimia species-specific qPCR were performed on 8 crepe and 6 elasticized bandages that were sampled on two independent soccasions in March 2014 and July 2016. Characteristics of the seven Lichtheimia mucormycoses which occurred in burn patients between November 2013 and July 2016 were also collected in order to assess the potential epidemiological relationship between potentially contaminated bandages and clinical infections. FINDINGS: One Lichtheimia corymbifera strain was isolated from a crepe bandage by culture, and Lichtheimia spp. qPCR was positive in 6/8 crepe and 4/6 elasticized bandages. Using species-specific qPCR, Lichtheimia ramosa, Lichtheimia ornata, and L. corymbifera were identified in 6/10, 5/10 and 4/10 bandages, respectively. In patients with mucormycosis, L. ramosa and L. ornata were present in five and two cases, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our data support the utility of Mucorales qPCR for epidemiological investigations, the potential role of these bandages in cutaneous mucormycoses in burn patients in our center, and, consequently, the need for sterile bandages for the dressing of extensive wounds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 393 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information