Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Muscle and Hypertonia [Words]
References found : 1270 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 127 go to page                         

  1 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29490197
[Au] Autor:Sanger TD
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA; email: terry@sangerlab.net.
[Ti] Title:Basic and Translational Neuroscience of Childhood-Onset Dystonia: A Control-Theory Perspective.
[So] Source:Annu Rev Neurosci;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1545-4126
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dystonia is a collection of symptoms with involuntary muscle activation causing hypertonia, hyperkinetic movements, and overflow. In children, dystonia can have numerous etiologies with varying neuroanatomic distribution. The semiology of dystonia can be explained by gain-of-function failure of a feedback controller that is responsible for stabilizing posture and movement. Because postural control is maintained by a widely distributed network, many different anatomic regions may be responsible for symptoms of dystonia, although all features of dystonia can be explained by uncontrolled activation or hypersensitivity of motor cortical regions that can cause increased reflex gain, inserted postures, or sensitivity to irrelevant sensory variables. Effective treatment of dystonia in children requires an understanding of the relationship between etiology, anatomy, and the specific mechanism of failure of postural stabilization. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 41 is July 8, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1146/annurev-neuro-080317-061504

  2 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29465077
[Au] Autor:Ivanov VV; Achkasov EE; Markov NM; Krechina EK
[Ad] Address:Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Izmenenie postural'nogo statusa pri ortodonticheskom lechenii narushenii prikusa. [Changes of postural statusa in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment].
[So] Source:Stomatologiia (Mosk);97(1):50-53, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0039-1735
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The study objective was to determinate variations of stato-dynamical functional markers of postural balance system in the process of malocclusion treatment. Twenty patients aged from 14 to 30 years with class II malocclusion were recruited for this prospective study. All patients underwent electromyography of mm. temporalis and mm. maseter in rest and at maximal jaws pressure. Postural balance was evaluated by stabilometry platform and body's regions relationship was assessed by computer optical topography. Orthodontic interventions included using occlusal splint, dental straps or 'TwinForce' device. There were two diagnostic sessions: before and after one month of orthodontic treatment. The majority of patients after anterior dislocation of mandible demonstrated significant increase in unilateral masticatory muscles activity (Ñ€<0.05) which correlated with iliac crest position. According to computerized topography data superior iliac crest position was registered in opposite side with regard to muscle hypertonia. According to stabilometry data forward translation of the mandible resulted in retroversion of total pressure point projection (Ñ€<0.05). Asymmetric muscle working in the process of occlusal adjustment may provoke postural imbalance in distal body regions. It dictates postural system condition monitoring during orthodontic treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17116/stomat201897150-53

  3 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Melaragno, Maria Isabel
Full text

[PMID]: 29258104
[Au] Autor:Malinverni ACM; Yamashiro Coelho ÉM; Chen K; Colovati ME; Soares Pinho Cernach MC; Bragagnolo S; Melaragno MI
[Ad] Address:Genetics Division, Department of Morphology and Genetics, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Deletion 21pterq22.11: Report of a Patient with Dysmorphic Features, Hypertonia, and Café-au-Lait Macules and Review of the Literature.
[So] Source:Cytogenet Genome Res;153(2):81-85, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1424-859X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Partial monosomy 21 results in a great variability of clinical features that may be associated with the size and location of the deletion. In this study, we report a 22-month-old girl who showed a 45,XX,add(12)(p13)dn,-21 karyotype. The final cytogenomic result was 45,XX,der(12)t(12;21)(p13;q22.11) dn,-21.arr[hg19] 21q11.2q22.11(14824453_33868129)×1 revealing a deletion from 21pter to 21q22.11. Clinical manifestation of the patient included hypertonia, a long philtrum, epicanthic folds, low-set ears, and café-au-lait macules - a phenotype considered as mild despite the relatively large size of the deletion compared to patients from the literature.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abnormalities, Multiple/genetics
Cafe-au-Lait Spots/genetics
Chromosome Deletion
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21/ultrastructure
Face/abnormalities
Muscle Hypertonia/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21/genetics
Developmental Disabilities/genetics
Female
Hearing Loss, Bilateral/genetics
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Karyotyping
Phenotype
Scoliosis/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000485282

  4 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29433091
[Au] Autor:van der Linden ML; Jahed S; Tennant N; Verheul MHG
[Ad] Address:Centre of Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research, Queen Margaret University, Queen Margaret University Drive, Musselburgh EH21 6UU, UK. Electronic address: mvanderlinden@qmu.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:The influence of lower limb impairments on RaceRunning performance in athletes with hypertonia, ataxia or athetosis.
[So] Source:Gait Posture;61:362-367, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2219
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: RaceRunning enables athletes with limited or no walking ability to propel themselves independently using a three-wheeled running bike that has a saddle and a chest plate for support but no pedals. For RaceRunning to be included as a Para athletics event, an evidence-based classification system is required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between a range of impairment measures and RaceRunning performance. METHODS: The following impairment measures were recorded: lower limb muscle strength assessed using Manual Muscle Testing (MMT), selective voluntary motor control assessed using the Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity (SCALE), spasticity recorded using both the Australian Spasticity Assessment Score (ASAS) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), passive range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities and the maximum static step length achieved on a stationary bike (MSSL). Associations between impairment measures and 100-meter race speed were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Sixteen male and fifteen female athletes (27 with cerebral palsy), aged 23 (SD = 7) years, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels ranging from II to V, participated. The MSSL averaged over both legs and the ASAS, MAS, SCALE, and MMT summed over all joints and both legs, significantly correlated with 100 m race performance (rho: 0.40-0.54). Passive knee extension was the only ROM measure that was significantly associated with race speed (rho = 0.48). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that lower limb spasticity, isometric leg strength, selective voluntary motor control and passive knee extension impact performance in RaceRunning athletes. This supports the potential use of these measures in a future evidence-based classification system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29268250
[Au] Autor:Drenth H; Zuidema SU; Krijnen WP; Bautmans I; van der Schans C; Hobbelen H
[Ad] Address:Research Group Healthy Ageing, Allied Healthcare and Nursing, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Psychometric Properties of the MyotonPRO in Dementia Patients with Paratonia.
[So] Source:Gerontology;, 2017 Dec 22.
[Is] ISSN:1423-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Paratonia is a distinctive form of hypertonia, causing loss of functional mobility in early stages of dementia to severe high muscle tone and pain in the late stages. For assessing and evaluating therapeutic interventions, objective instruments are required. OBJECTIVE: Determine the psychometric properties of the MyotonPRO, a portable device that objectively measures muscle properties, in dementia patients with paratonia. METHODS: Muscle properties were assessed with the MyotonPRO by 2 assessors within one session and repeated by the main researcher after 30 min and again after 6 months. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for all MyotonPRO outcomes to discriminate between participants with (n = 70) and without paratonia (n = 82). In the participants with paratonia, correlation coefficients were established between the MyotonPRO outcomes and the Modified Ashworth Scale for paratonia (MAS-P) and muscle palpation. In participants with paratonia, reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) and agreement values (standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change) were established. Longitudinal outcome from participants with paratonia throughout the study (n = 48) was used to establish the sensitivity for change (correlation coefficient) and responsiveness (minimal clinical important difference). RESULTS: Included were 152 participants with dementia (mean [standard deviation] age of 83.5 [98.2]). The area under the curve ranged from 0.60 to 0.67 indicating the MyotonPRO is able to differentiate between participants with and without paratonia. The MyotonPRO explained 10-18% of the MAS-P score and 8-14% of the palpation score. Interclass correlation coefficients for interrater reliability ranged from 0.57 to 0.75 and from 0.54 to 0.71 for intrarater. The best agreement values were found for tone, elasticity, and stiffness. The change between baseline and 6 months in the MyotonPRO outcomes explained 8-13% of the change in the MAS-P scores. The minimal clinically important difference values were all smaller than the measurement error. CONCLUSION: The MyotonPRO is potentially applicable for cross-sectional studies between groups of paratonia patients and appears less suitable to measure intraindividual changes in paratonia. Because of the inherent variability in movement resistance in paratonia, the outcomes from the MyotonPRO should be interpreted with care; therefore, future research should focus on additional guidelines to increase the clinical interpretation and improving reproducibility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171221
[Lr] Last revision date:171221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000485462

  6 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29161622
[Au] Autor:Lorentzen J; Pradines M; Gracies JM; Bo Nielsen J
[Ad] Address:Section for Integrative Neuroscience, Center for Neuroscience, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Elsass Institute, Holmegårdsvej 28, 2920 Charlottenlund, Denmark. Electronic address: Jlo@elsassfonden.dk.
[Ti] Title:On Denny-Brown's 'spastic dystonia' - What is it and what causes it?
[So] Source:Clin Neurophysiol;129(1):89-94, 2017 Nov 04.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8952
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this review, we will work around two simple definitions of two different entities, which most often co-exist in patients with lesions to central motor pathways: Spasticity is "Enhanced excitability of velocity-dependent responses to phasic stretch at rest", which will not be the subject of this review, while Spastic dystonia is tonic, chronic, involuntary muscle contraction in the absence of any stretch or any voluntary command (Gracies, 2005). Spastic dystonia is a much less well understood entity that will be the subject this review. Denny-Brown (1966) observed involuntary sustained muscle activity in monkeys with lesions restricted to the motor cortices . He further observed that such involuntary muscle activity persisted following abolition of sensory input to the spinal cord and concluded that a central mechanism rather than exaggerated stretch reflex activity had to be involved. He coined the term spastic dystonia to describe this involuntary tonic activity in the context of otherwise exaggerated stretch reflexes. Sustained involuntary muscle activity in the absence of any stretch or any voluntary command contributes to burdensome and disabling body deformities in patients with spastic paresis. Yet, little has been done since Denny-Brown's studies to determine the pathophysiology of this non- stretch or effort related sustained involuntary muscle activity following motor lesions and there is a clear need for research studies in order to improve current therapy. The purpose of the present review is to discuss some of the possible mechanisms that may be involved in the hope that this may guide future research. We discuss the existence of persistent inward currents in spinal motoneurones and present the evidence that the channels involved may be upregulated following central motor lesions. We also discuss a possible contribution from alterations in synaptic inputs from surviving or abnormally branched sensory and descending fibres leading to over-activity and lack of motor coordination. We finally discuss evidence of alterations in motor cortical representational maps and basal ganglia lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28985544
[Au] Autor:Marinelli L; Currà A; Trompetto C; Capello E; Serrati C; Fattapposta F; Pelosin E; Phadke C; Aymard C; Puce L; Molteni F; Abbruzzese G; Bandini F
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, University of Genova, Italy; Department of Neuroscience, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genova, Italy. Electronic address: lucio.marinelli@unige.it.
[Ti] Title:Spasticity and spastic dystonia: the two faces of velocity-dependent hypertonia.
[So] Source:J Electromyogr Kinesiol;37:84-89, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5711
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Spasticity and spastic dystonia are two separate phenomena of the upper motor neuron syndrome. Spasticity is clinically defined by velocity-dependent hypertonia and tendon jerk hyperreflexia due to the hyper-excitability of the stretch reflex. Spastic dystonia is the inability to relax a muscle leading to a spontaneous tonic contraction. Both spasticity and spastic dystonia are present in patients who are at rest; however, only patients with spasticity are actually able to kept their muscles relaxed prior to muscle stretch. The idea that has inspired the present work is that also in patients with spastic dystonia the stretch reflex is likely to be hyper-excitable. Therefore, velocity-dependent hypertonia could be mediated not only by spasticity, but also by spastic dystonia. METHODS: Tonic stretch reflexes in the rectus femoris muscle were evoked in 30 patients with multiple sclerosis showing velocity-dependent hypertonia of leg extensors and the habituation of the reflex was studied. Moreover, the capability of relax the muscle prior to muscle stretch (spastic dystonia) was also investigated. RESULTS: A tonic stretch reflex was evoked in all the enrolled patients. 73% of the patients were able to relax their rectus femoris muscle prior to stretch (spasticity). In the overwhelming majority of these patients, the tonic stretch reflex decreased during repeated stretches. In the remaining 27% of the subjects, the muscle was tonically activated prior to muscle stretch (spastic dystonia). In the patients in whom spastic dystonia progressively increased over the subsequent stretches (50% of the subjects with spastic dystonia), the habituation of the reflex was replaced by a progressive reflex facilitation. DISCUSSION: This study shows for the first time that velocity-dependent hypertonia can be caused by two distinct phenomena: spasticity and spastic dystonia. The habituation of the tonic stretch reflex, which is a typical feature of spasticity, is replaced by a reflex facilitation in the half of the subject with spastic dystonia. These preliminary findings suggest that differentiating the two types of velocity-dependent muscle hypertonia (spasticity and spastic dystonia) could be clinically relevant.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28918085
[Au] Autor:Guo P; Gao F; Zhao T; Sun W; Wang B; Li Z
[Ad] Address:The Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing.
[Ti] Title:Positive Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Spasticity in Poststroke Patients: A Meta-Analysis.
[So] Source:J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis;26(11):2470-2476, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a common and serious complication following a stroke, and many clinical research have been conducted to evaluate the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on muscle spasticity in poststroke patients. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect on decreasing spasticity caused by a stroke immediately and 4 weeks after the application of shock wave therapy. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases for relevant studies through November 2016 using the following item: (Hypertonia OR Spasticity) and (Shock Wave or ESWT) and (Stroke). The outcomes were evaluated by Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) grades and pooled by Stata 12.0 (Stata Corp, College Station, TX, USA). RESULTS: Six studies consisting of 9 groups were included in this meta-analysis. The MAS grades immediately after ESWT were significantly improved compared with the baseline values (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.57; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], -2.20, -.94). Similarly, the MAS grades judged at 4 weeks after ESWT were also showed to be significantly lower than the baseline values (SMD, -1.93; 95% CIs, -2.71, -1.15). CONCLUSIONS: ESWT for the spasticity of patients after a stroke is effective, as measured by MAS grades. Moreover, no serious side effects were observed in any patients after shock wave therapy. Nevertheless, our current study with some limitations such as the limited sample size only provided limited quality of evidence; confirmation from a further systematic review or meta-analysis with large-scale, well-designed randomized control trials is required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171002
[Lr] Last revision date:171002
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28891709
[Au] Autor:Kónyi A
[Ad] Address:Klinikai Központ, Szívgyógyászati Klinika, Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13., 7623.
[Ti] Title:Carvedilol alkalmazása a mindennapi kardiológiai és intervenciós kardiológiai gyakorlatban. [Carvedilol in the everyday interventional cardiology practice].
[So] Source:Orv Hetil;158(37):1453-1457, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0030-6002
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:hun
[Ab] Abstract:The treatment of severe coronary stenoses with stent implantation is very effective nevertheless, the underlying problem of atherosclerosis remains unsolved with the implantation of a stent. Therefore, besides lifestyle changes, the adequate medication therapy is of pivotal importance. In the majority of patients scheduled for or acutely undergoing catheterisation, beta-blockers form the basis of medication therapy. Members of the group, however, show significant differences in terms of pharmacodynamics. The third-generation beta-blocker and vasodilator carvedilol possesses complex adrenerg-blocking and Ca-channel blocking effects as well. In the background of the favourable effects, a further positive property is its anti-free-radical effect which most beta-blockers do not have. Therefore, as has been proven by several studies, it provides considerable benefits in hypertension, after myocardial infarction, in diabetes and also in the treatment of patients with cardiac failure. These positive effects have been markedly observed in interventional cardiology practice, as the majority of patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation have hypertension, diabetes or hyperlipidaemia. Its anti-free-radical effect is especially beneficial together with its smooth muscle proliferation-inhibitor effect which may favourably affect in-stent restenosis (ISR) as well. To summarise, due to its vasculoprotective effect, carvedilol is an ideal drug of choice following stent implantation in routine everyday practice. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(37): 1453-1457.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carbazoles/therapeutic use
Coronary Artery Disease/drug therapy
Propanolamines/therapeutic use
Vasodilator Agents/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Cardiology
Combined Modality Therapy
Coronary Artery Disease/therapy
Humans
Stents
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carbazoles); 0 (Propanolamines); 0 (Vasodilator Agents); 0K47UL67F2 (carvedilol)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170912
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/650.2017.30812

  10 / 1270 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28878481
[Au] Autor:Takeuchi N; Takezako N; Shimonishi Y; Usuda S
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Care, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Effects of high-intensity pulse irradiation with linear polarized near-infrared rays and stretching on muscle tone in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:J Phys Ther Sci;29(8):1449-1453, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0915-5287
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of high-intensity pulse irradiation with linear polarized near-infrared rays (HI-LPNR) and stretching on hypertonia in cerebrovascular disease patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 40 cerebrovascular disease patients with hypertonia of the ankle joint plantar flexor muscle. The subjects were randomly allocated to groups undergoing treatment with HI-LPNR irradiation (HI-LPNR group), stretching (stretching group), HI-LPNR irradiation followed by stretching (combination group), and control group (10 subjects each). In all groups, the passive range of motion of ankle dorsiflexion and passive resistive joint torque of ankle dorsiflexion were measured before and after the specified intervention. [Results] The changes in passive range of motion, significant increase in the stretching and combination groups compared with that in the control group. The changes in passive resistive joint torque, significant decrease in HI-LPNR, stretching, and combination groups compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] HI-LPNR irradiation and stretching has effect of decrease muscle tone. However, combination of HI-LPNR irradiation and stretching has no multiplier effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170910
[Lr] Last revision date:170910
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1589/jpts.29.1449


page 1 of 127 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information