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[PMID]: 29499665
[Au] Autor:Zhu Z; Zhang H; Yue J; Liu S; Li Z; Wang L
[Ad] Address:People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University and Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Henan Eye Institute, Henan Eye Hospital, Zhengzhou, 450003, China.
[Ti] Title:Antimicrobial efficacy of corneal cross-linking in vitro and in vivo for Fusarium solani: a potential new treatment for fungal keratitis.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;18(1):65, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of visual impairment worldwide. However, the effectiveness of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) for fungal keratitis remains controversial. In this study, we developed an in vitro and an in vivo models to assess the efficacy of CXL for Fusarium keratitis. METHODS: The effect of in vitro CXL fungicidal was evaluated on the cultures of Fusarium solani which were exposed to irradiation for different durations. Viability of fungal was appraised under four conditions: no treatment (control); CXL: UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin; riboflavin and UVA (365 nm). Each batch of sterile plate culture was irradiated for different CXL durations. The in vivo Therapeutic effect was studied on a mouse keratitis model. The animals were divided randomly into three groups: group A with no treatment (control); Group B with CXL treatment for two minutes and group C with CXL treatment for three minutes. The CXL procedure was performed 24 h post inoculation in each group. All mice with corneal involvement were scored daily for 7 days and 10 days after infection. Corneals were extracted at various time points for quantitative fungal recovery. Histological evaluations were conducted to calculate the number of polymorphonuclear cells. RESULTS: Viability of fungal decreased significantly in CXL group with 30-min irradiation compared with that in control, riboflavin and UVA groups (P < 0.01). The colony-forming units (CFUs) of fungal solutions in culture significantly decreased with CXL treatment (P < 0.05). Clinical scores, corneal lesion, corneal opacity, neovascularization and the depth of ulceration scores in group B and group C were remarkably lower than that in group A (P < 0.05, P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.034 and P = 0.025 respectively). Scores of group C were much lower than that in group B. Histological revealed that destruction of corneal collagen fibers and infiltration of inflammatory cells into corneal tissue in group B and group C were much lower than that in group A. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that CXL treatment may be applied to fungal keratitis, therapeutic efficacy will improve with longer treatment duration.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use
Corneal Stroma/metabolism
Corneal Ulcer/drug therapy
Cross-Linking Reagents
Eye Infections, Fungal/drug therapy
Fusariosis/drug therapy
Fusarium/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Collagen/metabolism
Colony Count, Microbial
Corneal Ulcer/metabolism
Corneal Ulcer/microbiology
Disease Models, Animal
Eye Infections, Fungal/metabolism
Eye Infections, Fungal/microbiology
Fusariosis/metabolism
Fusariosis/microbiology
Fusarium/isolation & purification
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use
Riboflavin/therapeutic use
Ultraviolet Rays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Infective Agents); 0 (Cross-Linking Reagents); 0 (Photosensitizing Agents); 9007-34-5 (Collagen); TLM2976OFR (Riboflavin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180304
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-018-0727-0

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[PMID]: 28452707
[Au] Autor:Roxbury CR; Smith DF; Higgins TS; Lee SE; Gallia GL; Ishii M; Lane AP; Reh DD
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
[Ti] Title:Complete surgical resection and short-term survival in acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.
[So] Source:Am J Rhinol Allergy;31(2):109-116, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-8932
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (AIFR) is a fulminant fungal infection seen in patients who are immunocompromised. Due to its rarity, there is little evidence regarding the appropriate antifungal treatment regimen, especially the degree of surgical intervention. OBJECTIVE: To assess factors that impact short-term survival in AIFR as defined by survival to hospital discharge and to develop a staging system to predict survival and complete surgical resection. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with histopathologically diagnosed AIFR who met inclusion criteria were identified between 1984 and 2014. Patient characteristics, disease extent, treatment modality, and short-term survival data were collected. Univariate analysis was performed to assess for factors associated with survival and increased likelihood of surgical resection. RESULTS: Of 52 patients with adequate documentation, 36 (69.2%) survived their hospital stay. Complete surgical resection was the only factor associated with improved survival (survival, 95.5%; p < 0.01). A surgical staging system was proposed to guide probability of complete resection and overall prognosis, with stage I disease limited to the nasal cavity, stage II involving the paranasal sinuses, stage III involving the orbit, and stage IV with skull base or intracranial extension. The χ2 analyses showed a decreased likelihood of complete surgical resection with stage III or IV disease compared with stage I (resection, 90.9%) (stage III resection, 37.5% [p = 0.01]; stage IV resection, 16.7% [p = 0.002]). There was a decreased likelihood of survival associated with increasing disease stage compared with stage I (survival, 100%) (stage II survival, 60% [p = 0.009]; stage III survival, 62.5% [p = 0.02]; stage IV survival, 54.6%, [p = 0.006]). CONCLUSION: Although further studies are needed to define specific treatment protocols, analysis of these data indicated that endoscopic sinus surgery with the goal of complete surgical resection may provide the best survival outcomes in select patients when complete surgical resection can be performed. Our staging system represents the first attempt to predict surgical success and prognosis in patients with AIFR.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/surgery
Nasal Cavity/surgery
Orbit/surgery
Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures
Paranasal Sinuses/surgery
Rhinitis/surgery
Sinusitis/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Female
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity/microbiology
Orbit/microbiology
Paranasal Sinuses/microbiology
Prognosis
Rhinitis/mortality
Sinusitis/mortality
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2500/ajra.2017.31.4420

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[PMID]: 29441972
[Au] Autor:Sakurada H; Yasuhara K; Kato K; Asano S; Yoshida M; Yamamura M; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:An investigation of visual hallucinations associated with voriconazole administration to patients with hematological malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(11):660-664, 2016 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Voriconazole (VRCZ) is commonly administered to treat fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Some of these patients experience VRCZ-associated visual hallucinations. We conducted a retrospective survey to investigate the characteristic features of this side effect. Patients with hematological malignancies who were treated with VRCZ for a fungal infection after hospitalization at Ichinomiya municipal hospital between 1 October 2005 and 31 December 2015 were included in this study (n = 103). Fifteen of these (14.6%) reported visual hallucinations that started on day 1-7. Seven of these 15 patients developed this symptom rapidly (day 1 or 2). Three patients had transient symptoms (lasting 2-12 days), 6 patients experienced hallucinations throughout the treatment, and the duration was unknown in 6 patients. Eleven patients experienced visual hallucinations when their eyes were closed (73 %) and these disappeared when they opened their eyes. One patient had visual hallucinations with open eyes, while the state of the eyes was unknown in 3 patients. The patients saw a range of images including people, animals, landscapes, and foods; several reported seeing images like those found in movies. In addition, 9 of 15 patients (60%) with visual hallucinations had visual disturbances. This was a higher proportion than that observed in patients who did not develop hallucinations (17 of 88; 19.3 %; P < 0.05). However, we found no significant difference between the blood VCRZ concentrations of patients who developed or did not develop visual hallucinations. This study indicated that most of these patients had visual hallucinations that manifested on eye closure, and they did not progress to serious mental illness. Our findings emphasized the importance of fully explaining the features of this symptom to each patient prior to starting VRCZ administration in order to reduce anxiety. In addition, since VRCZ discontinuation will compromise patient management, therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to increase the likelihood of successful therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/adverse effects
Hallucinations/chemically induced
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Hematologic Neoplasms/psychology
Voriconazole/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antifungal Agents/blood
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Female
Hallucinations/epidemiology
Hallucinations/psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Mycoses/prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Vision Disorders/chemically induced
Vision Disorders/epidemiology
Voriconazole/blood
Voriconazole/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); JFU09I87TR (Voriconazole)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6725

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[PMID]: 29517833
[Au] Autor:de Souza Fernandes L; Amorim YM; Silva ELD; Silva SC; Santos AJA; Peixoto FN; Pires LMN; Sakamoto RY; Pinto FDCH; Scarpa MVC; Gonzaga de Freitas Araújo M
[Ad] Address:Department of Drugs and Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, São Paulo State University - UNE, SP, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Formulation, stability study, and pre-clinical evaluation of a vaginal cream containing curcumin in a rat model of vulvovaginal candidiasis.
[So] Source:Mycoses;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0507
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Owing to the growing resistance among isolates of Candida species to usual antifungal agents and the well-known therapeutic potential of curcumin, the purpose of this study was to develop and validate a vaginal formulation containing this substance and to evaluating its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis METHODS: Curcumin was incorporated in a vaginal cream in three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%). The different concentrations of the cream and its controls were intravaginally administered in an immunosuppressed rat model to evaluate the efficacy in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis. Samples of the cream were also subjected to centrifugation and physical stability tests and an analytical method for quantification of curcumin was validated based on HPLC RESULTS: The formulation was stable and the HPLC method could be considered suitable for the quantitative determination of curcumin in the cream. After six days of pre-clinical study, the number of infected animals was 1/6 in all groups treated with curcumin vaginal cream and the fungal burden showed a progressive reduction. Reduction of the inflammatory infiltrate was observed in the group treated with 1.0% cream CONCLUSION: Vaginal cream containing curcumin could be considered a promising effective antifungal medicine in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/myc.12762

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Sidrim, José Júlio Costa
Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha
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[PMID]: 29517824
[Au] Autor:Brilhante RSN; Correia EEM; de Melo Guedes GM; de Oliveira JS; de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco D; de Aguiar Cordeiro R; de Queiroz Pinheiro A; Chaves LJQ; de Aquino Pereira Neto W; Sidrim JJC; Rocha MFG
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:In vitro activity of azole derivatives and griseofulvin against planktonic and biofilm growth of clinical isolates of dermatophytes.
[So] Source:Mycoses;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0507
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: As shown by recent researches, most of the clinically relevant fungi, including dermatophytes, form biofilms in vitro and in vivo, which may present antimicrobial tolerance favoring recurrent infections. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VCZ) and griseofulvin (GRI) against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum, in planktonic and biofilm growth. METHODS: For the planktonic form, susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), document M38-A2, while biofilm susceptibility was evaluated using the XTT colorimetric essay. RESULTS: The planktonic growth of all strains was inhibited by MIC values ranging from 0.00195-0.1225 µg/mL for VRC, 0.00195-0.25 µg/mL for ITC and <0.0039-4 µg/mL for GRI, while an increase of 50-fold the MIC was required to significantly reduce the metabolic activity (P<0.05) of dermatophyte biofilms. CONCLUSIONS: In brief, the ability of dermatophytes to form biofilms may be a contributing factor for the recalcitrance of dermatophytoses or the dissemination of the disease This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/myc.12763

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[PMID]: 29442037
[Au] Autor:Seko T; Usami E; Kimura M; Nakao T; Matsuoka T; Yoshimura T; Kanamori N; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:A comparative analysis of micafungin and caspofungin for empirical antifungal therapy in antibiotic-unresponsive febrile patients with hematologic malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(8):484-488, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was retrospectively carried out to compare the efficacy of echinocandins such as micafungin (MCFG) and caspofungin (CPFG) in the treatment of antibiotic-unresponsive febrile patients with hematologic malignancies. A total of 163 patients received either MCFG or CPFG. We evaluated the efficacy of echinocandin against fever decline in all patients. Fever decline, defined as a body temperature of less than 37.5 °C sustained for more than 48 h without scheduled antipyretic medication. Efficacy assessments showed that the incidence of fever decline was not significantly different between the MCFG and CPFG groups (P=0.599). The median number of days from the start of echinocandin administration to fever decline was 5 in both the MCFG and CPFG groups. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of anti-MRSA drugs (HR, 0.64; 95%CI, 0.45-0.90; P=0.011) and a change from echinocandins to voriconazole or liposomal-amphotericin B (HR, 0.50; 95%CI, 0.30-0.74; P<0.001) are significant risk factors for sustained fever. A significant difference (P=0.002) in incidence of fever decline was however associated with differences in the timing of anti-MRSA drug administration. The median number of days from the start of echinocandin administration to fever decline was 5 when administration of the anti-MRSA drug occurred "simultaneously or prior to echinocandin start" and 11 in the "next day or later of echinocandin start" group. In other words, starting anti-MRSA drug treatment after echinocandin treatment is a risk factor. In conclusion, MCFG and CPFG have similar efficacy as empirical antifungal agents in the treatment of antibioticunresponsive febrile patients with hematopoietic malignancies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Echinocandins/therapeutic use
Fever/drug therapy
Fever/etiology
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Lipopeptides/therapeutic use
Mycoses/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Resistance, Fungal
Female
Humans
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Echinocandins); 0 (Lipopeptides); F0XDI6ZL63 (caspofungin); R10H71BSWG (micafungin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6612

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[PMID]: 29489080
[Au] Autor:Kelemen H; Orgovan G; Szekely-Szentmiklosi B
[Ti] Title:Not available. [The pharmaceutical chemistry of azole antifungals.]
[So] Source:Acta Pharm Hung;86(3):85-98, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0001-6659
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:hun
[Ab] Abstract:Azole antifungals are a group of compounds that play essential rule in the treatment of surface and deep mycoses. They can be used externally to treat fungal infections of skin, mucous membranes and external genitalia but they are also suitable for oral treatment of systemic mycoses. Structurally they are classified into two groups: imidazoles and triazoles. Triazole antimycotics have wider spectrum of activity, favorable pharmacokinetics, they are of milder side effects and sofar less developed anti-fungal resistance. This paper provides an overview on the history, synthe- sis, physico-chemical properties, structure-activity relationships of azole antifungals but it also deals with their pharmacological properties and mechanism of action.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29256431
[Au] Autor:Kamoroff C; Goldberg CS
[Ad] Address:School of the Environment, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA.
[Ti] Title:Using environmental DNA for early detection of amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis prior to a ranid die-off.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;127(1):75-79, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Amphibian chytridiomycosis caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is an emerging infectious disease that has been associated with mass mortality and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. Environmental DNA (eDNA) techniques have been used to detect the presence of Bd in the environment, but not to detect Bd prior to an amphibian die-off. We collected eDNA using filtered water samples from 13 lakes across Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park. Seven of those sites had populations of mountain yellow-legged frogs, an amphibian highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, and 3 of those populations experienced a Bd related die-off 1 mo post-eDNA sampling. We detected Bd in eDNA samples that were collected 1 mo prior to the observed Bd-caused die-off at all 3 sites affected by Bd, and we did not detect Bd at the other sites where no die-off was observed. Our study indicates the potential to use eDNA techniques for early detection of Bd in the environment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chytridiomycota/genetics
DNA, Fungal/isolation & purification
Environmental Monitoring
Mycoses/microbiology
Ranidae
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
California
Mycoses/epidemiology
Mycoses/mortality
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Fungal)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao03183

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Vilegas, Wagner
Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira
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[PMID]: 29501673
[Au] Autor:Pereira LOM; Vilegas W; Tangerina MMP; Arunachalam K; Balogun SO; Matos PEO; Martins DTO
[Ad] Address:Área de Farmacologia, Departamento de Ciências Básicas em Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Lafoensia pacari A. St. -Hil: wound healing activity and mechanism of action of standardized hydroethanolic leaves extract.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE: Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., (Lythraceae) is a native tree of Brazilian Cerrado and commonly known in Brazil as "mangava-brava". Its leaves are used in Brazilian folk medicine in wound healing, cutaneous mycoses, and in the treatment of gastritis and ulcers. AIM OF THE STUDY: The present study was designed to evaluate the wound healing activity and mechanism of action of the hydroethanolic extract of Lafoensia pacari A. St. -Hil leaves (HELp), and to advance in its chemical profiling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HELp was prepared by maceration in 70% hydroethanolic solution (1:10, w/v). The phytochemical analyses were investigated using colorimetry and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS ). Its in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated in CHO-K1 and L929 cells, while the in vivo acute toxicity was performed in mice. The potential in vivo wound healing activity was assessed using excision and incision rat models and histopathology of the wounded skin (excision model) was carried out. The in vitro wound healing activity of HELp was demonstrated by scratch assay in L-929 cells, by measuring proliferation/migration rate and p-ERK 1/2 protein expression using western blot analysis. HELp's in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritonitis in mice, along with the determination of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α and IL-10) in the peritoneal lavages. Its potential in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using microbroth dilution assay, while in vitro antioxidant activities was by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) were assessed by using in vitro assays. RESULTS: The phytochemical analysis of HELp revealed the presence of polyphenols with ellagic acid, punicalagin, punicalin, kaempferol, quercetin-3-O-xylopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-rhamnopyranoside being the most prominent. HELp showed no toxicity on CHO-k1 and L929 cell lines. Topical treatment with HELp (10 and 30mg/g of gel) presented increased rates of wound contraction at all the days evaluated with complete wound re-epithelialization at 22.0 ± 1.5 (p < 0.05) and 21.7 ± 1.6 (p < 0.01) days, respectively. Topical application of HELp (10, 30 or 100mg/g of gel) in incised wounds caused an increase in tensile break strength at all concentrations causing moderate re-epithelialization and neovascularization, increased cell proliferation an accelerated remodeling phase of the wound, in a manner comparable to standard drug (Madecassol , 10mg/g). In the scratch assay with L929 cells, HELp (0.1 and 0.03mg/mL) and PDGF (5 ng/ml) resulted in the increased proliferation/migration rate of fibroblasts and higher expression of p-ERK 1/2 protein. In LPS-induced peritonitis, HELp (100 and 200mg/kg p.o.) decreased total leukocyte migration, comparable to the dexamethasone (0.5mg/kg p.o.). In RAW 264.7 macrophages activated by LPS, HELp produced anti-inflammatory activity dependent on increased concentrations of IL-10, reduction in NO production, without altering the TNF- α levels. HELp also presented potent antioxidant activity in the DPPH and ferric ion assays (FRAP), but lacks in vitro antibacterial activity. CONCLUSION: The present study results support the popular use of the leaves of L. pacari in the treatment of wounds. Its wound healing activity is multi-targeted and involves inhibition of the proliferative and anti-inflammatory phases, antioxidant and positive modulation of the remodeling phase that might be involved different secondary metabolites, with emphasis on the ellagic acid, punicalagin, punicalin, kaempferol, quercetin-3-O-xylopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-rhamnopyranoside.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 26696 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500853
[Au] Autor:Córdoba S; Isla G; Szusz W; Vivot W; Hevia A; Davel G; Canteros CE
[Ad] Address:Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas "Dr. C. G. Malbrán", Buenos Aires, Av. Vélez Sarsfield 563, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, CP 1282, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Molecular identification and susceptibility profile of Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato isolated in Argentina.
[So] Source:Mycoses;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0507
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We studied 23 clinical and environmental strains of Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato collected from 1984 to 2017 in Argentina. The molecular identification (partial sequencing of a fragment of the calmodulin gene) of the strains was performed. For the yeast and mycelial phases, the in vitro susceptibility testing by a microdilution reference method was determined against eight antifungal drugs. Strains studied were identified as S. schenckii sensu stricto 13 (56.5%), S. brasiliensis 8 (34.7%) and S. globosa 2 (8.7%). The most active antifungal drugs tested for the yeast and mycelial phases expressed as geometric mean (GM) value of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) (µg ml ) were terbinafine (0.07 and 0.24), posaconazole (0.13 and 0.58), itraconazole (0.38 and 1.10) and ketoconazole (0.22 and 0.89), while fluconazole (110.10 and 131.92) and flucytosine (2.96 and 79.03) were the less active. For voriconazole and amphotericin B the GM-MIC values were acceptably low for the yeast phase (0.39 and 0.72 µg ml ), while the mycelial phase showed values ≥2-fold higher (8.76 and 1.88 µg ml ), p < 0.05. Here we described S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. brasiliensis and S. globosa, these species were isolated from humans, animals and soil and are circulating in Argentina since at least 1984. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/myc.12760


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