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[PMID]: 29148267
[Au] Autor:Carnero J; Prieto C; Polledo L; Martínez-Lobo FJ
[Ad] Address:DVM, Swine Consultant, Valladolid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Detection of Teschovirus type 13 from two swine herds exhibiting nervous clinical signs in growing pigs.
[So] Source:Transbound Emerg Dis;, 2017 Nov 16.
[Is] ISSN:1865-1682
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recently, the number of clinical reports of growing pigs showing neurological signs possibly related to viral infections has increased. The objective of this report was to describe two outbreaks of an atypical condition observed in 6- to 7-week-old pigs with a morbidity of 20% and a fatality rate of 60% in two unrelated farms of the same company. During the acute phase of the disease, fever, sudden death, neurological signs, ear necrosis and occasional corneal opacity were observed. Histopathological examination revealed interstitial pneumonia, lymphoid depletion and lymphocytic vasculitis in different organs and mild polioencephalomyelitis suggesting a potential viral infection. Possible aetiologies such as exogenous intoxications, salt intoxication, mineral deficiencies/intoxications (Se, Cu, Cd and Zn), oedema disease and mycotoxicosis were ruled out through the diagnostic process. No clinically relevant bacteria could be consistently isolated from affected animals, and the presence of the common swine viruses was ruled out by PCR or RT-PCR. Porcine Teschovirus serotype 13 was the only virus detected by RT-PCR within central nervous system (CNS) of acutely affected pigs. This is the first description of PTV serotype 13 within the CNS of clinically affected pigs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tbed.12762

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[PMID]: 28430618
[Au] Autor:Adhikari M; Negi B; Kaushik N; Adhikari A; Al-Khedhairy AA; Kaushik NK; Choi EH
[Ad] Address:Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:T-2 mycotoxin: toxicological effects and decontamination strategies.
[So] Source:Oncotarget;8(20):33933-33952, 2017 May 16.
[Is] ISSN:1949-2553
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mycotoxins are highly diverse secondary metabolites produced in nature by a wide variety of fungus which causes food contamination, resulting in mycotoxicosis in animals and humans. In particular, trichothecenes mycotoxin produced by genus fusarium is agriculturally more important worldwide due to the potential health hazards they pose. It is mainly metabolized and eliminated after ingestion, yielding more than 20 metabolites with the hydroxy trichothecenes-2 toxin being the major metabolite. Trichothecene is hazardously intoxicating due to their additional potential to be topically absorbed, and their metabolites affect the gastrointestinal tract, skin, kidney, liver, and immune and hematopoietic progenitor cellular systems. Sensitivity to this type of toxin varying from dairy cattle to pigs, with the most sensitive endpoints being neural, reproductive, immunological and hematological effects. The mechanism of action mainly consists of the inhibition of protein synthesis and oxidative damage to cells followed by the disruption of nucleic acid synthesis and ensuing apoptosis. In this review, the possible hazards, historical significance, toxicokinetics, and the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects along with regulatory guidelines and recommendations pertaining to the trichothecene mycotoxin are discussed. Furthermore, various techniques utilized for toxin determination, pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment using herbal antioxidant compounds and regulatory guidelines and recommendations are reviewed. The prospects of the trichothecene as potential hazardous agents, decontamination strategies and future perspectives along with plausible therapeutic uses are comprehensively described.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170622
[Lr] Last revision date:170622
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.15422

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[PMID]: 28335412
[Au] Autor:Gómez-Espinosa D; Cervantes-Aguilar FJ; Del Río-García JC; Villarreal-Barajas T; Vázquez-Durán A; Méndez-Albores A
[Ad] Address:National Autonomous University of Mexico-Superior Studies Faculty at Cuautitlan (UNAM-FESC), Master in Animal Production and Health Sciences, Cuautitlan Izcalli 54714, Mexico. denisegoes1985@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Ameliorative Effects of Neutral Electrolyzed Water on Growth Performance, Biochemical Constituents, and Histopathological Changes in Turkey Poults during Aflatoxicosis.
[So] Source:Toxins (Basel);9(3), 2017 Mar 14.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6651
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Different in vitro and in silico approaches from our research group have demonstrated that neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) can be used to detoxify aflatoxins. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of NEW to detoxify B-aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) in contaminated maize and to confirm detoxification in an in vivo experimental model. Batches of aflatoxin-contaminated maize were detoxified with NEW and mixed in commercial feed. A total of 240 6-day-old female large white Nicholas-700 turkey poults were randomly divided into four treatments of six replicates each (10 turkeys per replicate), which were fed ad libitum for two weeks with the following dietary treatments: (1) control feed containing aflatoxin-free maize (CONTROL); (2) feed containing the aflatoxin-contaminated maize (AF); (3) feed containing the aflatoxin-contaminated maize detoxified with NEW (AF + NEW); and (4) control feed containing aflatoxin-free maize treated with NEW (NEW). Compared to the control groups, turkey poults of the AF group significantly reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio and mortality rate; whereas turkey poults of the AF + NEW group did not present significant differences on productive parameters. In addition, alterations in serum biochemical constituents, enzyme activities, relative organ weight, gross morphological changes and histopathological studies were significantly mitigated by the aflatoxin-detoxification procedure. From these results, it is concluded that the treatment of aflatoxin-contaminated maize with NEW provided reasonable protection against the effects caused by aflatoxins in young turkey poults.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Decontamination/methods
Mycotoxicosis
Turkeys
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aflatoxins/metabolism
Aflatoxins/toxicity
Animals
Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood
Aspergillus flavus/isolation & purification
Aspergillus flavus/metabolism
Blood Proteins/metabolism
Bursa of Fabricius/drug effects
Bursa of Fabricius/pathology
Electrolysis
Female
Liver/drug effects
Liver/pathology
Mycotoxicosis/metabolism
Mycotoxicosis/pathology
Mycotoxicosis/veterinary
Spleen/drug effects
Spleen/pathology
Turkeys/blood
Turkeys/growth & development
Water
Zea mays/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Aflatoxins); 0 (Blood Proteins); 059QF0KO0R (Water); EC 2.6.1.1 (Aspartate Aminotransferases)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170325
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28299723
[Au] Autor:Borchers AT; Chang C; Eric Gershwin M
[Ad] Address:Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Davis School of Medicine, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Suite 6510, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
[Ti] Title:Mold and Human Health: a Reality Check.
[So] Source:Clin Rev Allergy Immunol;52(3):305-322, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1559-0267
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are possibly millions of mold species on earth. The vast majority of these mold spores live in harmony with humans, rarely causing disease. The rare species that does cause disease does so by triggering allergies or asthma, or may be involved in hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or allergic fungal sinusitis. Other hypersensitivity diseases include those related to occupational or domiciliary exposures to certain mold species, as in the case of Pigeon Breeder's disease, Farmer's lung, or humidifier fever. The final proven category of fungal diseases is through infection, as in the case of onchomycosis or coccidiomycosis. These diseases can be treated using anti-fungal agents. Molds and fungi can also be particularly important in infections that occur in immunocompromised patients. Systemic candidiasis does not occur unless the individual is immunodeficient. Previous reports of "toxic mold syndrome" or "toxic black mold" have been shown to be no more than media hype and mass hysteria, partly stemming from the misinterpreted concept of the "sick building syndrome." There is no scientific evidence that exposure to visible black mold in apartments and buildings can lead to the vague and subjective symptoms of memory loss, inability to focus, fatigue, and headaches that were reported by people who erroneously believed that they were suffering from "mycotoxicosis." Similarly, a causal relationship between cases of infant pulmonary hemorrhage and exposure to "black mold" has never been proven. Finally, there is no evidence of a link between autoimmune disease and mold exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170506
[Lr] Last revision date:170506
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12016-017-8601-z

  5 / 599 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27593392
[Au] Autor:Golder HM; Moss N; Rogers G; Jackson B; Gannon N; Wong P; Lean IJ
[Ad] Address:a Scibus , 2 Broughton St, PO Box 660, Camden , NSW 2570 , Australia.
[Ti] Title:Acute photosensitisation and mortality in a herd of dairy cattle in Tasmania.
[So] Source:N Z Vet J;65(1):39-45, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1176-0710
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CASE HISTORY: A herd of Holstein, Jersey, or Holstein-Jersey cross lactating cattle of mixed ages presented with a sudden drop in milk yield in 94/678 cows on 3 October 2014 (Day 0). The herd was located in Gretna in the Derwent Valley (Tasmania, Australia) and had been grazing dryland pasture. CLINICAL FINDINGS: On Day 0 the cows variably showed recumbency, peracute photosensitisation, inflamed coronary bands, conjunctival erythema, periauricular oedema, distress indicated by kicking at the flank, bruxism, discomfort, weight shifting, vocalisation indicating pain and depression. Blood samples collected on Day 4 from five clinically affected cows showed high activities of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. Morbidity, based on the number of treated cases within 72 hours of clinical onset, was estimated at 165/678 cows (24.3%). Mortality over the first 30 days was 19/678 cows (2.8%). PATHOLOGICAL FINDINGS: Necropsies of two cows on Day 4 showed marked distension of the gall bladder and extensive icterus. Necropsies of another two cows on Day 5 showed enlarged livers with severe damage and oedema of the distal abomasum. Severe ulcerative abomasal gastritis was present in both cows. Hepatic histopathology was consistent with chronic cholangiohepatitis. MYCOTOXICOLOGY: Fifty-five different mycotoxins were detected from a barley grass (Hordeum murinum) sample from the presumably contaminated pasture. Concentrations of B-trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone metabolites from this sample were remarkably high. The leaf smut, Jamesdicksonia dactylidis, that has not been previously reported in Tasmania, was identified from the sample of barley grass, but it is not known whether the smut can produce toxins. DIAGNOSIS: Probably an undescribed peracute mycotoxicosis associated with the ingestion of contaminated dryland pasture. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A definitive diagnosis could not be reached in this case of acute photosensitisation and mortality in dairy cattle grazing possibly contaminated dryland pasture. The findings differed from both facial eczema and acute bovine liver disease, suggesting an undescribed mycotoxicosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cattle Diseases/epidemiology
Mycotoxicosis/veterinary
Photosensitivity Disorders/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases/etiology
Cattle Diseases/mortality
Cattle Diseases/pathology
Female
Gallbladder/pathology
Hordeum/chemistry
Hordeum/microbiology
Liver/pathology
Mycotoxicosis/epidemiology
Mycotoxicosis/mortality
Mycotoxicosis/pathology
Mycotoxins/analysis
Mycotoxins/poisoning
Photosensitivity Disorders/epidemiology
Photosensitivity Disorders/mortality
Photosensitivity Disorders/pathology
Tasmania/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Mycotoxins)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170208
[Lr] Last revision date:170208
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160906
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28035972
[Au] Autor:Read E; Edwards J; Deseo M; Rawlin G; Rochfort S
[Ad] Address:Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources, Biosciences Research, AgriBio, the Centre for AgriBioscience, 5 Ring Road, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia. elizabeth.read@ecodev.vic.gov.au.
[Ti] Title:Current Understanding of Acute Bovine Liver Disease in Australia.
[So] Source:Toxins (Basel);9(1), 2016 Dec 26.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6651
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute bovine liver disease (ABLD) is a hepatotoxicity principally of cattle which occurs in southern regions of Australia. Severely affected animals undergo rapid clinical progression with mortalities often occurring prior to the recognition of clinical signs. Less severely affected animals develop photosensitization and a proportion can develop liver failure. The characteristic histopathological lesion in acute fatal cases is severe, with acute necrosis of periportal hepatocytes with hemorrhage into the necrotic areas. Currently there are a small number of toxins that are known to cause periportal necrosis in cattle, although none of these have so far been linked to ABLD. Furthermore, ABLD has frequently been associated with the presence of rough dog's tail grass ( ) and spp. fungi in the pasture system, but it is currently unknown if these are etiological factors. Much of the knowledge about ABLD is contained within case reports, with very little experimental research investigating the specific cause(s). This review provides an overview of the current and most recently published knowledge of ABLD. It also draws on wider research and unpublished reports to suggest possible fungi and mycotoxins that may give rise to ABLD.
[Pt] Publication type:REVIEW; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 170224
[Lr] Last revision date:170224
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 27785798
[Au] Autor:Bryant BR; Campbell M; Sangster C
[Ad] Address:Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Obley Road, Dubbo, New South Wales 2830, Australia. bryantbenn@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Acute hepatic necrosis and death in a subadult southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) associated with exposure to sterigmatocystin in forage contaminated with Aspergillus nidulans.
[So] Source:Aust Vet J;94(11):433-434, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1751-0813
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A young male southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum), which was resident in a zoo as part of a multi-rhinoceros group, died suddenly. Necropsy and histopathological findings supported a diagnosis of death from acute hepatic necrosis. The microscopic distribution of liver lesions was suggestive of hepatotoxicosis. Further investigation revealed potential exposure to a mycotoxin, sterigmatocystin, present in spoiled lucerne hay contaminated with Aspergillus nidulans. It was concluded that mycotoxicosis was the likely cause of the hepatic necrosis and death in this animal.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161219
[Lr] Last revision date:161219
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/avj.12509

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[PMID]: 27648562
[Au] Autor:Schenk-Jäger KM; Egli S; Hanimann D; Senn-Irlet B; Kupferschmidt H; Büntgen U
[Ad] Address:National Poisons Information Centre, Tox Info Suisse, Associated Institute of the University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Introducing Mushroom Fruiting Patterns from the Swiss National Poisons Information Centre.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(9):e0162314, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Changes in the ecology of macrofungi are poorly understood, not only because much of their life cycle is hidden belowground, but also because experiments often miss real-world complexity and most fruitbody inventories are limited in space and time. The National Poisons Information Centre 'Tox Info Suisse' provides countrywide 24hours/7days medical advice in case of poisonings since 1966. Here, we introduce a total of 12,126 mushroom-related phone calls that were received by Tox Info Suisse between 1966 and 2014. This indirect source of mycological information is dominated by the families of Boletaceae (11%), Agaricaceae (10%) and Amanitaceae (8%), which account for ~30% of all cases. Mushroom fruiting patterns revealed by the Poisons Centre inventory statistically resemble changes in fungal phenology, productivity and diversity as reflected by the Swiss National Data Centre 'SwissFungi'. Although the newly developed Tox Info Suisse dataset provides an innovative basis for timely environmental research, caution is advised when interpreting some of the observed long-term changes and autumnal extremes. Uncertainty of the new record relates to possible data incompleteness, imprecise species description and/or identification, as well as the inclusion of cultivated and non-indigenous mushrooms. Nevertheless, we hope that the Tox Info Suisse inventory will stimulate and enable a variety of ecological-oriented follow-up studies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agaricales
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal
Mycotoxicosis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Agaricales/classification
Climate
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal/classification
Humans
Information Centers
Seasons
Species Specificity
Switzerland/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170811
[Lr] Last revision date:170811
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160921
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0162314

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[PMID]: 27255106
[Au] Autor:Dosen I; Andersen B; Phippen CB; Clausen G; Nielsen KF
[Ad] Address:Section for Eukaryotic Biotechnology, Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, 2800, Lyngby, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Stachybotrys mycotoxins: from culture extracts to dust samples.
[So] Source:Anal Bioanal Chem;408(20):5513-26, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1618-2650
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The filamentous fungus Stachybotrys chartarum is known for its toxic metabolites and has been associated with serious health problems, including mycotoxicosis, among occupants of contaminated buildings. Here, we present results from a case study, where an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for known and tentatively identified compounds characterized via UHPLC-quadruple time-of-flight (QTOF) screening of fungal culture extracts, wall scrapings and reference standards. The UHPLC-MS/MS method was able to identify 12 Stachybotrys metabolites, of which four could be quantified based on authentic standards and a further six estimated based on similarity to authentic standards. Samples collected from walls contaminated by S. chartarum in a water-damaged building showed that the two known chemotypes, S and A, coexisted. More importantly, a link between mycotoxin concentrations found on contaminated surfaces and in settled dust was made. One dust sample, collected from a water-damaged room, contained 10 pg/cm(2) macrocyclic trichothecenes (roridin E). For the first time, more than one spirocyclic drimane was detected in dust. Spirocyclic drimanes were detected in all 11 analysed dust samples and in total amounted to 600 pg/cm(2) in the water-damaged room and 340 pg/cm(2) in rooms adjacent to the water-damaged area. Their wide distribution in detectable amounts in dust suggested they could be good candidates for exposure biomarkers. Graphical abstract Stachybotrys growing on a gypsum board, and some of the compounds it produces.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00216-016-9649-y

  10 / 599 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27172005
[Au] Autor:Pappas AC; Tsiplakou E; Tsitsigiannis DI; Georgiadou M; Iliadi MK; Sotirakoglou K; Zervas G
[Ad] Address:a Department of Nutritional Physiology and Feeding, Faculty of Animal Science and Aquaculture , Agricultural University of Athens , Athens , Greece.
[Ti] Title:The role of bentonite binders in single or concomitant mycotoxin contamination of chicken diets.
[So] Source:Br Poult Sci;57(4):551-8, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1466-1799
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Concomitant presence of mycotoxins is more likely to appear than a single mycotoxicosis since many mycotoxigenic fungi grow and produce their toxic metabolites under similar conditions. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of 4 mycotoxin binders to protect meat-type chickens against single and concomitant administration in the feed of two mycotoxins, namely aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) both at concentration of 0.1 mg/kg. A total of 440 as hatched, d-old, Ross 308 broilers were reared for 42 d. There were 11 dietary treatments. Chickens were fed on either an uncontaminated basal diet, basal diet and AFB1, basal with concomitant presence of AFB1 and OTA, basal diet and three binders A, B and C (1%) with or without AFB1 or basal diet and binder D (0.5%) with or without concomitant presence of AFB1 and OTA. Performance, carcass yield and several biochemical parameters were examined. Mycotoxin concentration in liver and breast muscle samples was determined. Broiler performance under concomitant mycotoxin contamination was poorer than that under single mycotoxicosis. Mycotoxin presence increased relative heart weight compared to that of broilers fed on uncontaminated diets. Only OTA and not AFB1 was detected and only in the liver. OTA concentration was four-fold lower in broilers fed on a diet with binder compared to those fed on contaminated diets without binder. In conclusion, the study revealed that binder composition and presence or not of multiple toxins may be important factors for optimum broiler performance under mycotoxicosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bentonite/metabolism
Chickens
Diet/veterinary
Food Contamination/analysis
Mycotoxicosis/veterinary
Poultry Diseases/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aflatoxin B1/metabolism
Animal Feed/analysis
Animals
Mycotoxicosis/microbiology
Mycotoxicosis/prevention & control
Ochratoxins/metabolism
Poultry Diseases/microbiology
Random Allocation
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Ochratoxins); 1302-78-9 (Bentonite); 1779SX6LUY (ochratoxin A); 9N2N2Y55MH (Aflatoxin B1)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170123
[Lr] Last revision date:170123
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160513
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/00071668.2016.1187712


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