Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29481808
[Au] Autor:Benelli G; Otranto D; Caselli A; Romano D; Remorini D; Di Giuseppe G; Stefanini C; Mele M; Canale A
[Ad] Address:Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy; The BioRobotics Institute, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.benelli@santannapisa.it.
[Ti] Title:High innate attractiveness to black targets in the blue blowfly, Calliphora vomitoria (L.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).
[So] Source:Acta Trop;182:144-148, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Calliphora vomitoria is a myiasis-causing fly in many animal species including humans. The control of blowflies is still anchored on the use of chemicals. However, mass trapping and lure-and-kill techniques represent a promising alternative to pesticides. Visual and olfactory cues are the main stimuli routing the fly's landing behavior. Notably, color attractiveness has been barely explored in flies of medical and veterinary importance, with special reference to blowflies. In this study, we investigated the innate color preferences in C. vomitoria adults, testing binary combinations of painted targets under laboratory conditions. The identity of tested species C. vomitoria was confirmed by DNA sequencing (18S and cox1 genes). C. vomitoria flies showed a significant preference for black colored targets in all tested binary color combinations, after 5, 15, 30 and 60 min of exposure. Black targets were significantly preferred over blue, red, yellow and white ones. Spectral characteristics of all tested color combinations were quantified and the innate attraction of blowflies towards black targets was discussed in relation to their behavioral ecology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on innate color preferences in the Calliphora genus. Our findings can be useful to develop new, cheap and reliable monitoring traps as well as "lure and kill" tools to control blowfly pests.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29320820
[Au] Autor:Ahmed H; Sousa SR; Simsek S; Anastácio S; Kilinc SG
[Ad] Address:Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Park Road, Chakh Shazad, Islamabad, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:First Molecular Characterization of Hypoderma actaeon in Cattle and Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) in Portugal.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):653-658, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypoderma spp. larvae cause subcutaneous myiasis in several animal species. The objective of the present investigation was to identify and characterize morphologically and molecularly the larvae of Hypoderma spp. collected from cattle (Bos taurus taurus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the district of Castelo Branco, Portugal. For this purpose, a total of 8 larvae were collected from cattle (n=2) and red deer (n=6). After morphological identification of Hypoderma spp. larvae, molecular characterization was based on PCR-RFLP and mitochondrial CO1 gene sequence analysis. All larvae were morphologically characterized as the third instar larvae (L3) of H. actaeon. Two restriction enzymes were used for molecular identification of the larvae. TaqI restriction enzyme was not able to cut H. actaeon. However, MboII restriction enzyme differentiated Hypoderma species showing 210 and 450 bp bands in H. actaeon. Furthermore, according to the alignment of the mt-CO1 gene sequences of Hypoderma species and to PCR-RFLP findings, all the identified Hypoderma larvae were confirmed as H. actaeon. This is the first report of identification of Hypoderma spp. (Diptera; Oestridae) from cattle and red deer in Portugal, based on morphological and molecular analyses.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cattle Diseases/parasitology
Deer/parasitology
Diptera/classification
Diptera/genetics
Larva
Myiasis/parasitology
Myiasis/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cattle
Diptera/anatomy & histology
Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics
Larva/anatomy & histology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Portugal
Sequence Analysis/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.653

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[PMID]: 29517452
[Au] Autor:Avni-Magen N; Eshar D; Friedman M; Kirmayer D; Letschert L; Gati I; Kaufman E; Paz A; Lavy E
[Ti] Title:RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF A NOVEL SUSTAINED-RELEASE IVERMECTIN VARNISH FOR TREATMENT OF WOUND MYIASIS IN ZOO-HOUSED ANIMALS.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;49(1):201-205, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Myiasis is a major disease condition in human and veterinary medicine. Domestic, free-ranging, and zoo-housed animals can be severely affected by myiasis. Depending on case severity, multiple treatment episodes may be indicated and can lead to recurrent capturing, handling stress, and anesthetics, all of which increase the risk of adverse responses (including death) individually and also in the herd. As an insecticide, ivermectin is often used for larval control. A total of 28 individual myiasis cases were retrospectively evaluated, out of which 11 cases were also treated using an ivermectin sustained-release varnish (SRV). The clinical outcome of all cases was assessed and the results suggest that the use of a topical ivermectin SRV (with or without concurrent injectable ivermectin) can reduce handling and treatments, has no adverse effects, and has minimal recurrence of the disease when compared with cases treated without it.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1638/2016-0299R2.1

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[PMID]: 28749332
[Au] Autor:Landehag J; Skogen A; Åsbakk K; Kan B
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Finnmark Hospital Trust, Hammerfest, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Human myiasis caused by the reindeer warble fly, Hypoderma tarandi, case series from Norway, 2011 to 2016.
[So] Source:Euro Surveill;22(29), 2017 Jul 20.
[Is] ISSN:1560-7917
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypoderma tarandi causes myiasis in reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus spp.) in most northern hemisphere regions where these animals live. We report a series of 39 human myiasis cases caused by H. tarandi in Norway from 2011 to 2016. Thirty-two were residents of Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway, one a visitor to Finnmark, and six lived in other counties of Norway where reindeer live. Clinical manifestations involved migratory dermal swellings of the face and head, enlargement of regional lymph nodes, and periorbital oedema, with or without eosinophilia. Most cases of human myiasis are seen in tropical and subtropical countries, and in tourists returning from such areas. Our findings demonstrate that myiasis caused by H. tarandi is more common than previously thought. Healthcare professionals in regions where there is a likelihood of human infestation with H. tarandi (regions populated by reindeer), or treating returning travellers, should be aware of the condition. All clinicians are advised to obtain a detailed travel history when assessing patients with migratory dermal swellings. On clinical suspicion, ivermectin should be given to prevent larval invasion of the eye (ophthalmomyiasis). Since H. tarandi oviposits on hair, we suggest wearing a hat as a prevention measure.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diptera
Larva
Lymphadenopathy/etiology
Myiasis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Larva/physiology
Middle Aged
Parasite Egg Count
Reindeer/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29505667
[Au] Autor:Filho AO; Dias D; Miranda Á; Hebling E
[Ad] Address:Geriatric Dentistry Specialist, Department of Community Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Oral myiasis in older adult with severe Alzheimer's disease.
[So] Source:Spec Care Dentist;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1754-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Myiasis is a disease caused by the invasion of tissues by larvae of flies. The aim of this study was to carry out a review of reported cases of oral and maxillofacial myiasis in older adults and to show a case report of oral myiasis in a 95-year-old frail man with severe Alzheimer's disease from Brazil. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1988 and 2017, 35 oral and maxillofacial myiasis cases were reported in older adults in English-language studies from PubMed and Lilacs databases. CONCLUSIONS: Oral and maxillofacial myiasis in older adults showed low incidence and good prognosis of cure, when there were no systemic complications. Weakness, frailty, dementia, oral lesions, labial incompetence, poor oral hygiene, and bad breath were associated with this disease in reported cases. Preferential therapy choices were debridement alone or combined with Ivermectin. In this case report, debridement and Ivermectin prescription was an effective therapy for an older adult with severe Alzheimer's disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/scd.12277

  6 / 2893 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29186534
[Au] Autor:Bambaradeniya YTB; Karunaratne WAIP; Tomberlin JK; Goonerathne I; Kotakadeniya RB
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, Kandy, Sri Lanka.
[Ti] Title:Temperature and Tissue Type Impact Development of Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in Sri Lanka.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;55(2):285-291, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann; Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a facultative ecto-parasitic fly, distributed throughout the temperate and subtropical regions of the world. This blow fly species is of medical, veterinary, and forensic importance due to it being used in maggot debridement therapy (MDT), a causative agent of myiasis, and a decomposer of vertebrate carrion. The current study examined the combined effects of temperature and tissue type on the development of L. cuprina. Specimens were reared on three tissue types; swine muscle, swine liver, and bovine muscle at 20°C, 25°C, 27°C, and 38°C. The optimum condition for L. cuprina development was for immatures reared on bovine muscle (287.4 h) followed by those reared on swine muscle (288.0 h) and swine liver (288.4 h) at 27°C. The minimum temperature threshold of L. cuprina was deduced to be 14°C. No significant differences in larval width and length over time were determined for the tissue type.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx211

  7 / 2893 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29340784
[Au] Autor:Mulieri PR; Schaefer EF; Duré MI; González CE
[Ad] Address:Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Av. Angel Gallardo 470, C1405DJR, Buenos Aires, Argentina. mulierii@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:A new flesh fly species (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) parasitic on leptodactylid frogs.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;117(3):809-818, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here we describe a new species of sarcophagid fly reared from larvae found feeding on three species of leptodactylid frogs collected in subtropical Corrientes Province in northeastern Argentina. Our species description is based on adult male and female external morphology and genitalia. Adult males and females of the new species were associated with certainty because all specimens studied were reared from single clutches of larvae on each of three infested frogs. Thus, adult males and females reared from each clutch were siblings that emerged almost simultaneously. The paper provides line drawings, high-resolution photographs, and SEM images to aid in identifying Lepidodexia (Notochaeta) adelina sp. nov. and to distinguish the new species from its closely related congeners. We include brief notes on the host species and on larval feeding behavior of L. (N.) adelina. This is the first and only species in the genus Lepidodexia reported to parasitize leptodactylid frogs. Further, our observations reported here are the first to fully document a completed life cycle by sarcophagid fly larvae on three different species of leptodactylid frogs and the only well-documented case of myiasis of an amphibian in Argentina.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-018-5755-4

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[PMID]: 29362134
[Au] Autor:Suárez JA; Ying A; Orillac LA; Cedeño I; Sosa N
[Ad] Address:Gorgas Memorial Institute, City of Panama, Panama.
[Ti] Title:First case of Furuncular Myiasis due to Cordylobia anthropophaga in a Latin American resident returning from Central African Republic.
[So] Source:Braz J Infect Dis;22(1):70-73, 2018 Jan - Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4391
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Myiasis is a temporary infection of the skin or other organs with fly larvae. The larvae develop into boil-like lesions. Creeping sensations and pain are usually described by patients. Following the maturation of the larvae, spontaneous exiting and healing is experienced. Herein we present a case of a traveler returning from Central African Republic. She does not recall insect bites. She never took off her clothing for recreational bathing, nor did she visit any rural areas. The lesions appeared on unexposed skin. The specific diagnosis was performed by morphologic characterization of the larvae, resulting in Cordylobia anthropophaga, the dominant form of myiasis in Africa. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of C. anthropophaga in Latin America.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 2893 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351090
[Au] Autor:Norgan AP; Pritt BS
[Ad] Address:Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.
[Ti] Title:Parasitic Infections of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissues.
[So] Source:Adv Anat Pathol;25(2):106-123, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4031
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A variety of arthropods, protozoa, and helminths infect the skin and subcutaneous tissues and may be identified by anatomic pathologists in standard cytology and histology preparations. The specific organisms seen vary greatly with the patient's exposure history, including travel to or residence in endemic countries. Arthropods are the most commonly encountered parasites in the skin and subcutaneous tissues and include Sarcoptes scabei, Demodex species, Tunga penetrans, and myiasis-causing fly larvae. Protozoal parasites such as Leishmania may also be common in some settings. Helminths are less often seen, and include round worms (eg, Dirofilaria spp.), tapeworms (eg, Taenia solium, Spirometra spp.), and flukes (eg, Schistosoma spp.). This review covers the epidemiologic and histopathologic features of common parasitic infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissues.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/PAP.0000000000000183

  10 / 2893 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29417554
[Au] Autor:Khater HF; Ali AM; Abouelella GA; Marawan MA; Govindarajan M; Murugan K; Abbas RZ; Vaz NP; Benelli G
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Benha University, Moshtohor, Toukh, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Toxicity and growth inhibition potential of vetiver, cinnamon, and lavender essential oils and their blends against larvae of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata.
[So] Source:Int J Dermatol;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-4632
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Myiasis induced by the sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata, represents a public health problem widely distributed throughout the world. L. sericata larval stages feed on both humans and animals. L. sericata adults and larvae can play a role in spreading agents of mycobacterial infections. OBJECTIVES: It is critical to establish new and safe alternative methods of controlling L. sericata. METHODS: The insecticidal effectiveness and growth inhibition potential of three commercially available essential oils (EOs), vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), as well as their blends, were tested against the second (L2) and third (L3) larval stages of L. sericata. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) oil was used as a carrier and tested on L2 and L3 larvae. To the best of our knowledge, all applied essential oils, except lavender, and oil blends were tested against L. sericata for the first time. RESULTS: All applied oils did not repel L2 from the treated liver but adversely affected their development. Contact treatments on L. sericata L3 indicated that vetiver and cinnamon oils significantly affected treated larvae. Total mortality rates were 93.33 and 95.56%, respectively. Furthermore, oil blends tested through contact assays killed larvae when used at higher concentrations; adult emergence was eliminated post-treatment with doses >30% for oil blend 1 and >10% for oil blend 2. CONCLUSION: Overall, cinnamon and vetiver oils (5%) were selected as reliable and cheap biopesticides for controlling larvae of L. sericata. The tested oils are inexpensive and represent new promising botanical insecticides in the fight against blowflies causing myiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ijd.13828


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