Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Nairobi and Sheep and Disease [Words]
References found : 77 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 8 go to page                    

  1 / 77 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29164137
[Au] Autor:Alarcon P; Fèvre EM; Muinde P; Murungi MK; Kiambi S; Akoko J; Rushton J
[Ad] Address:Royal Veterinary College, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Urban Livestock Keeping in the City of Nairobi: Diversity of Production Systems, Supply Chains, and Their Disease Management and Risks.
[So] Source:Front Vet Sci;4:171, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2297-1769
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Urban livestock keeping in developing cities have an important role in food security and livelihoods but can also pose a significant threat to the environment and health of urban dwellers. The aim of this study was to identify the different livestock systems in Nairobi, their supply chains, and their management and food safety risks. Seven focus group discussions with livestock production officers in charge of each major Nairobi sub-county were conducted. Data were collected on the type of systems existing for each livestock species and their supply chains, disease management, food safety risks, and general husbandry and gender factors. Supply chain flow diagrams and thematic analysis of the data was done. Results of the study show a large variability of livestock keeping in Nairobi. The majority were small scale with: <5 dairy cows, 1-6 dairy goats, <10 small ruminants, <20 pigs, 200-500 broilers, 300-500 layers, <10 indigenous chickens, or <20 rabbits. Beef keeping was mainly described as a "by the way" system or done by traders to fatten animals for 3 month. Supply chain analysis indicated that most dairy farmers sold milk directly to consumers due to "lack of trust" of these in traders. Broiler and pig farmers sold mainly to traders but are dependent on few large dominating companies for their replacement or distribution of products. Selling directly to retailers or consumers (including own consumption), with backyard slaughtering, were important chains for small-scale pig, sheep and goat, and indigenous chicken keepers. Important disease risk practices identified were associated with consumption of dead and sick animals, with underground network of brokers operating for ruminant products. Qualified trained health managers were used mainly by dairy farmers, and large commercial poultry and pig farmers, while use of unqualified health managers or no treatment were common in small-scale farming. Control of urban livestock keepers was reported difficult due to their "feeling of being outlaws," "lack of trust" in government, "inaccessibility" in informal settlements, "lack of government funding," or "understaffing." Findings are useful for designing policies to help to control urban livestock production and minimize its associated health and environment risks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171126
[Lr] Last revision date:171126
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fvets.2017.00171

  2 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28948950
[Au] Autor:Yadav PD; Chaubal GY; Shete AM; Mourya DT
[Ad] Address:Maximum Containment Laboratory, ICMR-National Institute of Virology, Pune, India.
[Ti] Title:A mini-review of Bunyaviruses recorded in India.
[So] Source:Indian J Med Res;145(5):601-610, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:0971-5916
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Newly emerging and re-emerging viral infections are of major public health concern. Bunyaviridae family of viruses comprises a large group of animal viruses. Clinical symptoms exhibited by persons infected by viruses belonging to this family vary from mild-to-severe diseases i.e., febrile illness, encephalitis, haemorrhagic fever and acute respiratory illness. Several arthropods-borne viruses have been discovered and classified at serological level in India in the past. Some of these are highly pathogenic as the recent emergence and spread of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus and presence of antibodies against Hantavirus in humans in India have provided evidences that it may become one of the emerging diseases in this country. For many of the discovered viruses, we still need to study their relevance to human and animal health. Chittoor virus, a variant of Batai virus; Ganjam virus, an Asian variant of Nairobi sheep disease virus; tick-borne viruses such as Bhanja, Palma and mosquito-borne viruses such as Sathuperi, Thimiri, Umbre and Ingwavuma viruses have been identified as the members of this family. As Bunyaviruses are three segmented RNA viruses, they can reassort the segments into genetically distinct viruses in target cells. This ability is believed to play a major role in evolution, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the viruses. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of discovery, emergence and distribution of Bunyaviruses in India.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1871_15

  3 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27412597
[Au] Autor:Deaton MK; Dzimianski JV; Daczkowski CM; Whitney GK; Mank NJ; Parham MM; Bergeron E; Pegan SD
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.
[Ti] Title:Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species.
[So] Source:J Virol;90(18):8314-27, 2016 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another. IMPORTANCE: Viral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of IFN-I signaling pathways. Unlike the case with ubiquitin, the amino acid sequences of ISG15s from various species are notably divergent. We illustrate that vOTUs have clear preferences for ISG15s from certain species. In addition, these observations are related to the molecular insights acquired via the first X-ray structure of the vOTU from the Erve nairovirus in complex with the first structurally resolved nonhuman ISG15. This information implicates certain amino acids that drive the preference of vOTUs for ISG15s from certain species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Nairovirus/enzymology
Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism
Ubiquitins/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Crystallography, X-Ray
Humans
Models, Molecular
Nairovirus/physiology
Peptide Hydrolases/chemistry
Protein Binding
Protein Conformation
Proteolysis
Ubiquitins/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Ubiquitins); EC 3.4.- (Peptide Hydrolases)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170508
[Lr] Last revision date:170508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160715
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1128/JVI.00975-16

  4 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 27294949
[Au] Autor:Kuhn JH; Wiley MR; Rodriguez SE; Bào Y; Prieto K; Travassos da Rosa AP; Guzman H; Savji N; Ladner JT; Tesh RB; Wada J; Jahrling PB; Bente DA; Palacios G
[Ad] Address:Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. kuhnjens@mail.nih.gov.
[Ti] Title:Genomic Characterization of the Genus Nairovirus (Family Bunyaviridae).
[So] Source:Viruses;8(6), 2016 Jun 10.
[Is] ISSN:1999-4915
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nairovirus, one of five bunyaviral genera, includes seven species. Genomic sequence information is limited for members of the Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, Qalyub, Sakhalin, and Thiafora nairovirus species. We used next-generation sequencing and historical virus-culture samples to determine 14 complete and nine coding-complete nairoviral genome sequences to further characterize these species. Previously unsequenced viruses include Abu Mina, Clo Mor, Great Saltee, Hughes, Raza, Sakhalin, Soldado, and Tillamook viruses. In addition, we present genomic sequence information on additional isolates of previously sequenced Avalon, Dugbe, Sapphire II, and Zirqa viruses. Finally, we identify Tunis virus, previously thought to be a phlebovirus, as an isolate of Abu Hammad virus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the need for reassignment of Sapphire II virus to Dera Ghazi Khan nairovirus and reassignment of Hazara, Tofla, and Nairobi sheep disease viruses to novel species. We also propose new species for the Kasokero group (Kasokero, Leopards Hill, Yogue viruses), the Ketarah group (Gossas, Issyk-kul, Keterah/soft tick viruses) and the Burana group (Wenzhou tick virus, Huángpí tick virus 1, TÇŽchéng tick virus 1). Our analyses emphasize the sister relationship of nairoviruses and arenaviruses, and indicate that several nairo-like viruses (Shayáng spider virus 1, Xinzhou spider virus, Sanxiá water strider virus 1, South Bay virus, WÇ”hàn millipede virus 2) require establishment of novel genera in a larger nairovirus-arenavirus supergroup.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genetic Variation
Genome, Viral
Nairovirus/classification
Nairovirus/genetics
Phylogeny
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cluster Analysis
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Nairovirus/isolation & purification
RNA, Viral/genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170913
[Lr] Last revision date:170913
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160614
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 26903607
[Au] Autor:Walker PJ; Widen SG; Wood TG; Guzman H; Tesh RB; Vasilakis N
[Ad] Address:CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas; Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases and Department of Pathology, Center for
[Ti] Title:A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;94(5):1107-22, 2016 May 04.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arachnid Vectors/physiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/veterinary
Genome, Viral
Nairovirus/genetics
Tick-Borne Diseases/veterinary
Ticks/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bunyaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/virology
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral
Host Specificity
Nairovirus/classification
Phylogeny
Protein Conformation
Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases/virology
Ticks/physiology
Viral Proteins/chemistry
Viral Proteins/genetics
Viral Proteins/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Viral Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170509
[Lr] Last revision date:170509
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0917

  6 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 26647464
[Au] Autor:M D B; B H
[Ti] Title:Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.
[So] Source:Rev Sci Tech;34(2):411-7, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0253-1933
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Nairobi Sheep Disease/virology
Nairobi sheep disease virus/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Africa/epidemiology
Animals
India/epidemiology
Nairobi Sheep Disease/epidemiology
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 170922
[Lr] Last revision date:170922
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151210
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26324724
[Au] Autor:Walker PJ; Widen SG; Firth C; Blasdell KR; Wood TG; Travassos da Rosa AP; Guzman H; Tesh RB; Vasilakis N
[Ad] Address:CSIRO Biosecurity, Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas; Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M
[Ti] Title:Genomic Characterization of Yogue, Kasokero, Issyk-Kul, Keterah, Gossas, and Thiafora Viruses: Nairoviruses Naturally Infecting Bats, Shrews, and Ticks.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;93(5):1041-51, 2015 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The genus Nairovirus of arthropod-borne bunyaviruses includes the important emerging human pathogen, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), as well as Nairobi sheep disease virus and many other poorly described viruses isolated from mammals, birds, and ticks. Here, we report genome sequence analysis of six nairoviruses: Thiafora virus (TFAV) that was isolated from a shrew in Senegal; Yogue (YOGV), Kasokero (KKOV), and Gossas (GOSV) viruses isolated from bats in Senegal and Uganda; Issyk-Kul virus (IKV) isolated from bats in Kyrgyzstan; and Keterah virus (KTRV) isolated from ticks infesting a bat in Malaysia. The S, M, and L genome segments of each virus were found to encode proteins corresponding to the nucleoprotein, polyglycoprotein, and polymerase protein of CCHFV. However, as observed in Leopards Hill virus (LPHV) and Erve virus (ERVV), polyglycoproteins encoded in the M segment lack sequences encoding the double-membrane-spanning CCHFV NSm protein. Amino acid sequence identities, complement-fixation tests, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses cluster into three groups comprising KKOV, YOGV, and LPHV from bats of the suborder Yingochiroptera; KTRV, IKV, and GOSV from bats of the suborder Yangochiroptera; and TFAV and ERVV from shrews (Soricomorpha: Soricidae). This reflects clade-specific host and vector associations that extend across the genus.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bunyaviridae Infections/virology
Chiroptera/virology
Genome, Viral/genetics
Nairovirus/genetics
Shrews/virology
Ticks/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Base Sequence
Bunyaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Genomics
Humans
Kyrgyzstan/epidemiology
Malaysia/epidemiology
Nairovirus/classification
Nairovirus/isolation & purification
Nucleoproteins/genetics
Phylogeny
Senegal/epidemiology
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Uganda/epidemiology
Viral Proteins/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Nucleoproteins); 0 (Viral Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 161203
[Lr] Last revision date:161203
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150902
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0344

  8 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25905707
[Au] Autor:Lasecka L; Bin-Tarif A; Bridgen A; Juleff N; Waters RA; Baron MD
[Ad] Address:The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Pirbright, Woking, Surrey GU24 0NF, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Antibodies to the core proteins of Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus reveal details of the distribution of the proteins in infected cells and tissues.
[So] Source:PLoS One;10(4):e0124966, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV; also called Ganjam virus in India) is a bunyavirus of the genus Nairovirus. It causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%. The virus is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). Little is currently known about the biology of NSDV. We have generated specific antibodies against the virus nucleocapsid protein (N) and polymerase (L) and used these to characterise NSDV in infected cells and to study its distribution during infection in a natural host. Due to its large size and the presence of a papain-like protease (the OTU-like domain) it has been suggested that the L protein of nairoviruses undergoes an autoproteolytic cleavage into polymerase and one or more accessory proteins. Specific antibodies which recognise either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the NSDV L protein showed no evidence of L protein cleavage in NSDV-infected cells. Using the specific anti-N and anti-L antibodies, it was found that these viral proteins do not fully colocalise in infected cells; the N protein accumulated near the Golgi at early stages of infection while the L protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, further supporting the multifunctional nature of the L protein. These antibodies also allowed us to gain information about the organs and cell types targeted by the virus in vivo. We could detect NSDV in cryosections prepared from various tissues collected post-mortem from experimentally inoculated animals; the virus was found in the mucosal lining of the small and large intestine, in the lungs, and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), where NSDV appeared to target monocytes and/or macrophages.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Viral/immunology
Nairobi Sheep Disease/immunology
Nairobi sheep disease virus/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cells, Cultured
Sheep
Tissue Distribution
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 161019
[Lr] Last revision date:161019
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150424
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124966

  9 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25811222
[Au] Autor:Gong S; He B; Wang Z; Shang L; Wei F; Liu Q; Tu C
[Ti] Title:Nairobi sheep disease virus RNA in ixodid ticks, China, 2013.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;21(4):718-20, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ixodidae/virology
Nairobi sheep disease virus/genetics
RNA, Viral
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Arachnid Vectors/virology
China
Molecular Sequence Data
Nairobi sheep disease virus/classification
Nairobi sheep disease virus/isolation & purification
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 150401
[Lr] Last revision date:150401
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150327
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2104.141602

  10 / 77 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24751197
[Au] Autor:Hubálek Z; Rudolf I; Nowotny N
[Ad] Address:Medical Zoology Laboratory, Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Brno, Czech Republic; Department of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address: zhubalek@brno.cas.cz.
[Ti] Title:Arboviruses pathogenic for domestic and wild animals.
[So] Source:Adv Virus Res;89:201-75, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8399
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of this chapter is to provide an updated and concise systematic review on taxonomy, history, arthropod vectors, vertebrate hosts, animal disease, and geographic distribution of all arboviruses known to date to cause disease in homeotherm (endotherm) vertebrates, except those affecting exclusively man. Fifty arboviruses pathogenic for animals have been documented worldwide, belonging to seven families: Togaviridae (mosquito-borne Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan equine encephalilitis viruses; Sindbis, Middelburg, Getah, and Semliki Forest viruses), Flaviviridae (mosquito-borne yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu, Israel turkey meningoencephalitis, Tembusu and Wesselsbron viruses; tick-borne encephalitis, louping ill, Omsk hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Tyuleniy viruses), Bunyaviridae (tick-borne Nairobi sheep disease, Soldado, and Bhanja viruses; mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever, La Crosse, Snowshoe hare, and Cache Valley viruses; biting midges-borne Main Drain, Akabane, Aino, Shuni, and Schmallenberg viruses), Reoviridae (biting midges-borne African horse sickness, Kasba, bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease of deer, Ibaraki, equine encephalosis, Peruvian horse sickness, and Yunnan viruses), Rhabdoviridae (sandfly/mosquito-borne bovine ephemeral fever, vesicular stomatitis-Indiana, vesicular stomatitis-New Jersey, vesicular stomatitis-Alagoas, and Coccal viruses), Orthomyxoviridae (tick-borne Thogoto virus), and Asfarviridae (tick-borne African swine fever virus). They are transmitted to animals by five groups of hematophagous arthropods of the subphyllum Chelicerata (order Acarina, families Ixodidae and Argasidae-ticks) or members of the class Insecta: mosquitoes (family Culicidae); biting midges (family Ceratopogonidae); sandflies (subfamily Phlebotominae); and cimicid bugs (family Cimicidae). Arboviral diseases in endotherm animals may therefore be classified as: tick-borne (louping ill and tick-borne encephalitis, Omsk hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease, Tyuleniy fever, Nairobi sheep disease, Soldado fever, Bhanja fever, Thogoto fever, African swine fever), mosquito-borne (Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitides, Highlands J disease, Getah disease, Semliki Forest disease, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis, Usutu disease, Israel turkey meningoencephalitis, Tembusu disease/duck egg-drop syndrome, Wesselsbron disease, La Crosse encephalitis, Snowshoe hare encephalitis, Cache Valley disease, Main Drain disease, Rift Valley fever, Peruvian horse sickness, Yunnan disease), sandfly-borne (vesicular stomatitis-Indiana, New Jersey, and Alagoas, Cocal disease), midge-borne (Akabane disease, Aino disease, Schmallenberg disease, Shuni disease, African horse sickness, Kasba disease, bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease of deer, Ibaraki disease, equine encephalosis, bovine ephemeral fever, Kotonkan disease), and cimicid-borne (Buggy Creek disease). Animals infected with these arboviruses regularly develop a febrile disease accompanied by various nonspecific symptoms; however, additional severe syndromes may occur: neurological diseases (meningitis, encephalitis, encephalomyelitis); hemorrhagic symptoms; abortions and congenital disorders; or vesicular stomatitis. Certain arboviral diseases cause significant economic losses in domestic animals-for example, Eastern, Western and Venezuelan equine encephalitides, West Nile encephalitis, Nairobi sheep disease, Rift Valley fever, Akabane fever, Schmallenberg disease (emerged recently in Europe), African horse sickness, bluetongue, vesicular stomatitis, and African swine fever; all of these (except for Akabane and Schmallenberg diseases) are notifiable to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE, 2012).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arbovirus Infections/veterinary
Arboviruses/classification
Arboviruses/isolation & purification
Arthropod Vectors/classification
Arthropod Vectors/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Domestic
Animals, Wild
Arbovirus Infections/epidemiology
Arbovirus Infections/transmission
Arbovirus Infections/virology
Insect Control
Phylogeography
Topography, Medical
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 140422
[Lr] Last revision date:140422
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140423
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 8 go to page                    
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information