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[PMID]: 29439382
[Au] Autor:Ongete G; Duffy FJR
[Ad] Address:Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.
[Ti] Title:The impact of occupational splash, sharps and needlestick injuries (SSNIs) on the quality of life of healthcare workers in a Kenyan university hospital.
[So] Source:Work;59(1):103-119, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1875-9270
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Infection as a consequence of splash sharps and needlestick injuries (SSNIs) is a hazard faced by healthcare workers. Little is known about the impact this has on quality of life particularly in countries where the risk of infection is high. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the impact SSNIs have on the quality of life of healthcare workers in Kenya, where blood borne illness prevalence is high. METHODS: A hospital-wide survey of a facility in Nairobi was conducted. Data was collected online from at risk healthcare workers using Burckhardt and Anderson's Quality of Life Scale (QOLS) and a 10-item symptoms questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 416 participants, 192 (46.2%) had experienced SSNIs. Their mean QOLS scores were considerably lower than that predicted for a healthy population. The relationship between symptoms and QOLS scores showed a strong positive correlation (Pearson's r = 0.753). Tests of association between QOLS scores and SSNI type, anti-retroviral (ARV) drug use, educational level and staff cadre revealed significant association (p < 0.05). However, on key demographic variables, the association was non-dependent, indicating that the impact was felt similarly by many staff. CONCLUSIONS: SSNIs clearly impact on healthcare workers quality of life. Hospital management should ensure measures are taken to reduce SSNIs and provide appropriate personal protection equipment. For staff experiencing an SSNI, psychological wellbeing should be assessed and appropriate expert help provided.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3233/WOR-172664

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[PMID]: 29323843
[Au] Autor:Borisevich IV; Chemikova NK; Markov VI; Krasnianskiy VP; Borisevich SV; Rozhdestvenskiy EV
[Ti] Title:An experience in the clinical use of specific immunoglobulin from horse blood serum for prophylaxis of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.
[So] Source:Vopr Virusol;62(1):25-9, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0507-4088
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this work was to estimate the efficacy and safety of single intramuscular introduction of specific heterologous immunoglobulin as prophylactic drug against Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Materials and methods. The specific heterologous immunoglobulin was introduced as a special prophylactic drug to 28 patients in epidemic situations, after skin hurt with infectious materials or contact with infectious blood. Clinico-laboratory observation was performed in 24 subjects after single intramuscular introduction of heterologous immunoglobulin Ebola. The samples of blood serum were investigated for immunoglobulin Ebola and antibodies to horse gamma-globulin on the 30th and 60th days after prophylaxis. Results. None of the subjects of the study contracted Ebola fever. There were no anaphylactic reactions after special prophylaxis with specific heterologous immunoglobulin. Among the subjects with normal allergic state 31% responded with local reactions; 13%, with a general reaction (mild case of the serum disease). Almost no reaction was observed in patients with unfavorable allergic state subjected to desensitizing therapy; in the absence of desensitizing therapy, 50% of patients with unfavorable allergic state exhibited local reactions; 17%, mild cases of the serum disease; 33%, moderate cases of the serum disease. In summary, if the tactics of immunoglobulin application was right, the quantity of local allergic reactions was 28%; of wide spread reactions, 6%. Weak serum disease was observed in 11% of the subjects. The prognostic period of resistance to Ebola fever was less than 30 days. Conclusion. The prophylactic use of specific immunoglobulin from horse blood serum against hemorrhagic Ebola fever is effective and relatively safe in patients subjected to desensitizing therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage
Ebolavirus/immunology
Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control
Immunoglobulin G/administration & dosage
Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Viral/adverse effects
Antibodies, Viral/blood
Child
Contact Tracing
Desensitization, Immunologic
Ebolavirus/pathogenicity
Female
Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/immunology
Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/transmission
Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/virology
Horses/blood
Horses/immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity/immunology
Hypersensitivity/physiopathology
Immunization, Passive
Immunoglobulin G/adverse effects
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Injections, Intramuscular
Male
Middle Aged
Needlestick Injuries/immunology
Patient Safety
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Immunoglobulin G)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28449921
[Au] Autor:Nwaiwu CA; Egro FM; Smith S; Harper JD; Spiess AM
[Ad] Address:University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
[Ti] Title:Seroconversion rate among health care workers exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids: The University of Pittsburgh 13-year experience.
[So] Source:Am J Infect Control;45(8):896-900, 2017 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3296
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The studies enumerating the risk of HIV transmission to health care workers (HCWs) as 0.3% after percutaneous exposure to HIV-positive blood, and 0.09% after a mucous membrane exposure, are weakened by dated literature. Our study aims to demonstrate the seroconversion rate after exposure to HIV-contaminated body fluids in a major academic center in the United States. METHODS: A prospectively maintained database of reported occupational injuries occurring between 2002 and 2015 at an academic medical center was analyzed. Data collected included the type of injury, injured body part, type of fluid, contamination of sharps, involvement of resident physicians, use of postexposure prophylaxis, and patients' HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus status. RESULTS: A total of 266 cases were included in the study. Most exposures were caused by percutaneous injuries (52.6%), followed by 43.2% mucocutaneous injuries. Of the injuries, 52.6% were to the hand and 33.5% to the face and neck. Blood exposure accounted for 64.3% of all cases. Of the patients, 21.1% received postexposure prophylaxis. None of the HCWs exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids seroconverted (seroconversion rate, 0%). CONCLUSIONS: HIV does not seem to be as easily transmitted by needlestick, laceration, or splash injuries as previously surmised. Further large-scale and multicenter studies are needed for a more accurate estimation of the risk of transmission of HIV in U.S. health care workers.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-HIV Agents/administration & dosage
Body Fluids/virology
HIV Infections/transmission
HIV Seropositivity/epidemiology
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use
Health Personnel
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Occupational Exposure
Pennsylvania
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-HIV Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180129
[Lr] Last revision date:180129
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29359645
[Au] Autor:Surjadi M
[Ad] Address:1 University of California, San Francisco.
[Ti] Title:Chronic Hepatitis C Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment Update in the Age of Direct-Acting Antivirals.
[So] Source:Workplace Health Saf;:2165079917751479, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2165-0969
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Globally, hepatitis C virus (HCV), the cause of one of the most common infectious diseases, infects approximately 4 million to 5 million Americans with approximately half of infected individuals undiagnosed. Some workplaces screen employees for HCV exposure and other bloodborne pathogens (BBP) after needlestick injuries, but it is not well known whether employers screen employees for HCV without an occupational exposure. New guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that all individuals born between 1945 and 1965 should be screened for HCV regardless of risk; this provides an opportunity at the worksite for HCV outreach to employees, dependents, and retirees. To understand this recommendation, the management of HCV in the age of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) should be reviewed. Now that new DAA treatment can cure HCV, occupational health nurses should identify potential HCV-positive individuals at the worksite via HCV education, screening, testing, and, if positive, linking to specialists for treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/2165079917751479

  5 / 3617 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29190036
[Au] Autor:Reddy VK; Lavoie MC; Verbeek JH; Pahwa M
[Ad] Address:Cochrane Work Review Group, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Neulaniementie 4, Kuopio, Finland, 70101.
[Ti] Title:Devices for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;11:CD009740, 2017 11 14.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Percutaneous exposure injuries from devices used for blood collection or for injections expose healthcare workers to the risk of blood borne infections such as hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Safety features such as shields or retractable needles can possibly contribute to the prevention of these injuries and it is important to evaluate their effectiveness. OBJECTIVES: To determine the benefits and harms of safety medical devices aiming to prevent percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel versus no intervention or alternative interventions. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, NHSEED, Science Citation Index Expanded, CINAHL, Nioshtic, CISdoc and PsycINFO (until 11 November 2016). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before and after studies (CBA) and interrupted time-series (ITS) designs of the effect of safety engineered medical devices on percutaneous exposure injuries in healthcare staff. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two of the authors independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias and extracted data. We synthesized study results with a fixed-effect or random-effects model meta-analysis where appropriate. MAIN RESULTS: We included six RCTs with 1838 participants, two cluster-RCTs with 795 participants and 73,454 patient days, five CBAs with approximately 22,000 participants and eleven ITS with an average of 13.8 data points. These studies evaluated safe modifications of blood collection systems, intravenous (IV) systems, injection systems, multiple devices, sharps containers and legislation on the implementation of safe devices. We estimated the needlestick injury (NSI) rate in the control groups to be about one to five NSIs per 1000 person-years. There were only two studies from low- or middle-income countries. The risk of bias was high in 20 of 24 studies. Safe blood collection systems:We found one RCT that found a safety engineered blood gas syringe having no considerable effect on NSIs (Relative Risk (RR) 0.2, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) 0.01 to 4.14, 550 patients, very low quality evidence). In one ITS study, safe blood collection systems decreased NSIs immediately after the introduction (effect size (ES) -6.9, 95% CI -9.5 to -4.2) but there was no further decrease over time (ES -1.2, 95% CI -2.5 to 0.1, very low quality evidence). Another ITS study evaluated an outdated recapping shield, which we did not consider further. Safe Intravenous systemsThere was very low quality evidence in two ITS studies that NSIs were reduced with the introduction of safe IV devices, whereas one RCT and one CBA study provided very low quality evidence of no effect. However, there was moderate quality evidence produced by four other RCT studies that these devices increased the number of blood splashes when the safety system had to be engaged actively (relative risk (RR) 1.6, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.36). In contrast there was low quality evidence produced by two RCTs of passive systems that showed no effect on blood splashes. Yet another RCT produced low quality evidence that a different safe active IV system also decreased the incidence of blood leakages. Safe injection devicesThere was very low quality evidence provided by one RCT and one CBA study showing that introduction of safe injection devices did not considerably change the NSI rate. One ITS study produced low quality evidence showing that the introduction of safe passive injection systems had no effect on NSI rate when compared to safe active injection systems. Multiple safe devicesThere was very low quality evidence from one CBA study and two ITS studies. According to the CBA study, the introduction of multiple safe devices resulted in a decrease in NSI,whereas the two ITS studies found no change. Safety containersOne CBA study produced very low quality evidence showing that the introduction of safety containers decreased NSI. However, two ITS studies evaluating the same intervention found inconsistent results. LegislationThere was low to moderate quality evidence in two ITS studies that introduction of legislation on the use of safety-engineered devices reduced the rate of NSIs among healthcare workers. There was also low quality evidence which showed a decrease in the trend over time for NSI rates.Twenty out of 24 studies had a high risk of bias and the lack of evidence of a beneficial effect could be due to both confounding and bias. This does not mean that these devices are not effective. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: For safe blood collection systems, we found very low quality evidence of inconsistent effects on NSIs. For safe passive intravenous systems, we found very low quality evidence of a decrease in NSI and a reduction in the incidence of blood leakage events but moderate quality evidence that active systems may increase exposure to blood. For safe injection needles, the introduction of multiple safety devices or the introduction of sharps containers the evidence was inconsistent or there was no clear evidence of a benefit. There was low to moderate quality evidence that introduction of legislation probably reduces NSI rates.More high-quality cluster-randomised controlled studies that include cost-effectiveness measures are needed, especially in countries where both NSIs and blood-borne infections are highly prevalent.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blood Specimen Collection/instrumentation
Health Personnel
Needlestick Injuries/prevention & control
Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
Protective Devices
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Blood Specimen Collection/methods
Controlled Before-After Studies
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous/instrumentation
Injections/instrumentation
Needlestick Injuries/epidemiology
Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
Personal Protective Equipment
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009740.pub3

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[PMID]: 29214171
[Au] Autor:Trask C; Bath B; Milosavljevic S; Kociolek AM; Predicala B; Penz E; Adebayo O; Whittington L
[Ad] Address:Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, P.O. Box 23, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 2Z4.
[Ti] Title:Evaluating Swine Injection Technologies as a Workplace Musculoskeletal Injury Intervention: A Study Protocol.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2017:5094509, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intensification of modern swine production has led to many new technologies, including needleless injectors. Although needleless injectors may increase productivity (by reducing injection time) and reduce needlestick injuries, the effect on risk for musculoskeletal disorders is not clear. This project will compare conventional needles with needleless injectors in terms of cost, productivity, injury rates, biomechanical exposures, and worker preference. Muscle activity (EMG) and hand/wrist posture will be measured on swine workers performing injection tasks with both injection methods. Video recordings during the exposure assessments will compare the duration and productivity for each injection method using time-and-motion methods. Injury claim data from up to 60 pig barns will be analyzed for needlestick and musculoskeletal injuries before/after needleless injector adoption. Workers and managers will be asked about what they like and dislike about each method and what helps and hinders successful implementation. The information above will be input into a cost-benefit model to determine the incremental effects of needleless injectors in terms of occupational health, worker preference, and the financial "bottom line" of the farm. Findings will be relevant to the swine industry and are intended to be transferable to other new technologies in animal production.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/5094509

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[PMID]: 29129032
[Au] Autor:Alhazmi RA; Parker RD; Wen S
[Ad] Address:Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, P. O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA. rialhazmi@mix.wvu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Needlestick Injuries Among Emergency Medical Services Providers in Urban and Rural Areas.
[So] Source:J Community Health;, 2017 Nov 11.
[Is] ISSN:1573-3610
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Through this study, we assessed the knowledge of EMS providers regarding needle stick injuries (NSIs) and examined differences by demographics. This cross-sectional study used a random sample of certified EMS providers in West Virginia. The survey consists of three sections: socio-demographic characteristics, whether or not got NSIs in the past 12 months, whether or not received needle stick training before. A total of 248 out of 522 (47.31%) EMS providers completed the survey. The majority of EMS providers (81.99%, n = 202) reported no NSI ever and 18.21% (n = 45) had at least one NSI within past 12 months. Chi square test was used and there was a statistically significant association between NSI occurrence and age (P < 0.01); certification level (P = 0.0005); and years of experience (P < 0.0001). Stratification methods were used and there was high varying proportion in NSIs between urban areas (38.50%) and rural areas (14.70%) among females (OR 0.28, CI 0.075-1.02, P = 0.05). Our survey of NSIs among EMS providers found that older, more highly certified, and more experienced providers reported higher frequencies of NSIs. Female EMS providers are more prone to NSIs in urban areas compared to women in rural areas. The results indicate a need to further examine NSIs and provide information regarding the safety precautions among urban and rural EMS providers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171112
[Lr] Last revision date:171112
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10900-017-0446-0

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[PMID]: 29073827
[Au] Autor:Zhang X; Chen Y; Li Y; Hu J; Zhang C; Li Z; Stallones L; Xiang H
[Ad] Address:1 Southeast University, Nanjing.
[Ti] Title:Needlestick and Sharps Injuries Among Nursing Students in Nanjing, China.
[So] Source:Workplace Health Saf;:2165079917732799, 2017 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:2165-0969
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Needlestick and sharps injuries (NSIs) are a major cause of occupational injuries for health care workers worldwide. In this study, the authors report the prevalence of and risk factors for NSIs among Chinese nursing students. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 442 nursing students; 393 completed questionnaires were submitted. A total of 237 (60.3%) nursing students reported NSIs, which were more commonly reported by female students, younger students, students who worked frequent night shifts, students without safety training, and students who did not use personal protective equipment. Among those injured, 59.9% were injured by syringe needles, 21.9% by glass items, and 3.4% by scissors. Of those needles and sharps causing injuries, 36.3% of devices had been used on patients, 41% were unused, and 22.7% were unknown. Opening ampoules or vials was the most common injury agent. A total of 86.9% of NSIs were not reported to hospital infection control. Nursing students are at high risk of NSIs in China. Occupational safety training should be developed and implemented to prevent NSIs among this vulnerable population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/2165079917732799

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[PMID]: 29033615
[Au] Autor:Cooke CE; Stephens JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD.
[Ti] Title:Clinical, economic, and humanistic burden of needlestick injuries in healthcare workers.
[So] Source:Med Devices (Auckl);10:225-235, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1179-1470
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Needlestick injuries (NSIs) from a contaminated needle put healthcare workers (HCWs) at risk of becoming infected with a blood-borne virus and suffering serious short- and long-term medical consequences. Hypodermic injections using disposable syringes and needles are the most frequent cause of NSIs. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic literature review on NSI and active safety-engineered devices for hypodermic injection. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COCHRANE databases were searched for studies that evaluated the clinical, economic, or humanistic outcomes of NSI or active safety-engineered devices. RESULTS: NSIs have been reported by 14.9%-69.4% of HCWs with the wide range due to differences in countries, settings, and methodologies used to determine rates. Exposure to contaminated sharps is responsible for 37%-39% of the worldwide cases of hepatitis B and C infections in HCWs. HCWs may experience serious emotional effects and mental health disorders after a NSI, resulting in work loss and post-traumatic stress disorder. In 2015 International US$ (IntUS$), the average cost of a NSI was IntUS$747 (range IntUS$199-1,691). Hypodermic injections, the most frequent cause of NSI, are responsible for 32%-36% of NSIs. The use of safety devices that cover the needle-tip after hypodermic injection lowers the risk of NSI per HCW by 43.4%-100% compared to conventional devices. The economic value of converting to safety injective devices shows net savings, favorable budget impact, and overall cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSION: The clinical, economic, and humanistic burden is substantial for HCWs who experience a NSI. Safety-engineered devices for hypodermic injection demonstrate value by reducing NSI risk, and the associated direct and indirect costs, psychological stress on HCWs, and occupational blood-borne viral infection risk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/MDER.S140846

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[PMID]: 29028564
[Au] Autor:Cepeda JA; Strathdee SA; Arredondo J; Mittal ML; Rocha T; Morales M; Clairgue E; Bustamante E; Abramovitz D; Artamonova I; Bauelos A; Kerr T; Magis-Rodriguez CL; Beletsky L
[Ad] Address:University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine, Division of Global Public Health, La Jolla, CA, United States. Electronic address: jacepeda@ucsd.edu.
[Ti] Title:Assessing police officers' attitudes and legal knowledge on behaviors that impact HIV transmission among people who inject drugs.
[So] Source:Int J Drug Policy;50:56-63, 2017 Oct 10.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4758
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Policing practices such as syringe confiscation and arrest can act as important social-structural drivers of HIV risk among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, police referral to treatment and other services may improve the health of PWID. Little is known about the role of modifiable attitudinal and knowledge factors in shaping officer behavior. Using baseline findings from a police education program (PEP), we assessed relationships between drug policy knowledge and attitudes towards public health interventions with self-reported syringe confiscation, drug arrest, and service referral among street-level police in Tijuana, Mexico. METHODS: Between February, 2015 and May, 2016 we surveyed 1319 police officers who reported syringe contact. The self-administered survey focused on attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors related to drug policy, public health, and occupational safety. We used ordinal logistic regression to model the odds of syringe confiscation, arrest for heroin possession, and referring PWID to health/social programs. RESULTS: The sample was mostly male (87%) and had at least a high school education (80%). In the last six months, a minority reported always/sometimes confiscating syringes (49%), arresting someone for heroin possession (43%), and referring PWID to health and social programs (37%). Those reporting needlestick injuries (NSI) had 1.38 (95% CI: 1.02-1.87) higher odds of reporting syringe confiscation. Officers who had favorable views on laws that treat addiction as a public health issue had lower odds (aOR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.59-1.03) of arresting PWID. Those agreeing that it was their role to refer PWID to health and social programs had higher odds of reporting such referrals (aOR: 3.32, 95% CI: 2.52-4.37). Legal knowledge was not associated with these practices. CONCLUSION: Changing drug policy and knowledge may be insufficient in shifting police behavior. Modifying officers' occupational risks and attitudes towards harm reduction interventions can facilitate efforts to align police practices with PWID health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171021
[Lr] Last revision date:171021
[St] Status:Publisher


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