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Search on : Neisseriaceae and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29246347
[Au] Autor:Droz N; Enouf V; Bidet P; Mohamed D; Behillil S; Simon AL; Bachy M; Caseris M; Bonacorsi S; Basmaci R
[Ad] Address:Pediatric-Emergency Department, Louis-Mourier Hospital, AP-HP, Colombes, France.
[Ti] Title:Temporal Association Between Rhinovirus Activity and Kingella kingae Osteoarticular Infections.
[So] Source:J Pediatr;192:234-239.e2, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the seasonal distribution of Kingella kingae osteoarticular infections is similar to that of common respiratory viruses. STUDY DESIGN: Between October 2009 and September 2016, we extracted the results of K kingae-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses performed for bone or joint specimens in patients from 2 pediatric tertiary care centers in Paris. We used data of respiratory virus detection from the Réseau National des Laboratoires network with coordination with the National Influenza Center of France. The Spearman rank correlation was used to assess a correlation between weekly distributions, with P < .05 denoting a significant correlation. RESULTS: During the 7-year study period, 322 children were diagnosed with K kingae osteoarticular infection, and 317 testing episodes were K kingae-negative. We observed high activity for both K kingae osteoarticular infection and human rhinovirus (HRV) during the fall (98 [30.4%] and 2401 [39.1%] cases, respectively) and low activity during summer (59 [18.3%] and 681 [11.1%] cases, respectively). Weekly distributions of K kingae osteoarticular infection and rhinovirus activity were significantly correlated (r = 0.30; P = .03). In contrast, no significant correlation was found between the weekly distribution of K kingae osteoarticular infection and other respiratory viruses (r = -0.17, P = .34 compared with respiratory syncytial virus; r = -0.13, P = .34 compared with influenza virus; and r = -0.22, P = .11 compared with metapneumovirus). CONCLUSION: A significant temporal association was observed between HRV circulation and K kingae osteoarticular infection, strengthening the hypothesis of a role of viral infections in the pathophysiology of K kingae invasive infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthritis, Infectious/epidemiology
Kingella kingae
Neisseriaceae Infections/epidemiology
Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Rhinovirus
Seasons
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Arthritis, Infectious/diagnosis
Arthritis, Infectious/virology
Child, Preschool
France/epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Kingella kingae/isolation & purification
Neisseriaceae Infections/diagnosis
Neisseriaceae Infections/virology
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171226
[Lr] Last revision date:171226
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29255553
[Au] Autor:Hiddou A; Zemmrani Y; Ahroui Y; Soraa N
[Ad] Address:Service de Microbiologie, CHU Mohammed VI, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Bactériémie à Kingella denitrificans chez un enfant suivi pour un syndrome d'insuffisance médullaire. [Bacteremia due to Kingella denitrificans in a child followed-up for bone marrow failure syndrome].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:83, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Kingella denitrificans is a non-pathogenic micro-organism present in oropharyngeal flora. This germ has been recently recognized as responsible for opportunistic invasive infections mainly affecting immunosuppressed patients. We here report the case of a child aged 3 years and 7 months followed-up since the age of one year for bone marrow failure syndrome associated with pancytopenia of undetermined origin who had bacteremia due to Kingella denitrificans, a group of difficult to culture gram-negative bacteria rarely described in the literature. Clinicians and microbiologists should suspect the presence of this germ especially in immunosuppressed patients. The use of blood culture bottle contributes in a significant way to the detection of this germ.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia, Aplastic/immunology
Bacteremia/diagnosis
Bone Marrow Diseases/immunology
Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/immunology
Neisseriaceae Infections/diagnosis
Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bacteremia/microbiology
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Kingella/isolation & purification
Male
Neisseriaceae Infections/microbiology
Opportunistic Infections/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.83.13698

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[PMID]: 29165520
[Au] Autor:Rivacoba MC; Izquierdo G; Zenteno N; Porte L
[Ad] Address:Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Bacteriemia por Neisseria subflava en un recién nacido. [Neisseria subflava bacteremia in newborns: case report and review of the literature].
[So] Source:Rev Chilena Infectol;34(4):389-392, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0717-6341
[Cp] Country of publication:Chile
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Neisseria subflava belongs to Neisseriaceae family, is considered a comensal specie, however in certain host, mainly inmunosuppresed patientes and children, the literature has documented invasive infections. We present a case of a bacteriemia due to N. subflava in a newborn, treated with cefotaxime with good outcome. In newborns, the most common Neisseria bacteria to cause invasive infections are N. meningitidis, with highly fatal clinical course and N. gonorrhoeae which compromise the eye, oftalmia neonatorum, with uncommon invasive infections. It's very important the adequate microbiological diagnosis because the biochemical tests may be inconclusive. MALDITOF mass spectrometry technique is a useful tool.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171122
[Lr] Last revision date:171122
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 890 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28874431
[Au] Autor:Gravel J; Ceroni D; Lacroix L; Renaud C; Grimard G; Samara E; Cherkaoui A; Renzi G; Schrenzel J; Manzano S
[Ad] Address:Departments of Pediatrics (Gravel), Microbiology (Renaud) and Orthopedics (Grimard), Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Que.; Departments of Paediatric Orthopedics (Ceroni, Samara) and Paediatric Emergency Medicine (Lacroix, Manzano), Clinical Microbio
[Ti] Title:Association between oropharyngeal carriage of and osteoarticular infection in young children: a case-control study.
[So] Source:CMAJ;189(35):E1107-E1111, 2017 Sep 05.
[Is] ISSN:1488-2329
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: has been increasingly identified in patients with osteoarticular infections. Our main objective was to evaluate the association between carriage of in the oropharynx of preschool children and osteoarticular infections. METHODS: We conducted this prospective case-control study in 2 tertiary care pediatric hospitals (Canada and Switzerland) between 2014 and 2016. Potential cases were children aged 6 to 48 months with a presumptive diagnosis of osteoarticular infection according to the treating emergency physician. Confirmed cases were those with diagnosis of osteomyelitis or septic arthritis proven by positive findings on technetium-labelled bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging or identification of a microorganism in joint aspirate or blood. For each case, we recruited 4 age-matched controls from among children presenting to the same emergency department for trauma. The independent variable was presence of oropharyngeal DNA identified by a specific polymerase chain reaction assay. We determined the association between oropharyngeal carriage of and definitive osteoarticular infection. RESULTS: The parents of 77 children admitted for suspected osteoarticular infection and 286 controls were invited to participate and provided informed consent. We identified in the oropharynx of 46 (71%) of 65 confirmed cases and 17 (6%) of 286 controls; these results yielded an odds ratio of 38.3 (95% confidence interval 18.5-79.1). INTERPRETATION: Detection of oropharyngeal was strongly associated with osteoarticular infection among children presenting with symptoms suggestive of such infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthritis, Infectious/microbiology
Carrier State/microbiology
Kingella kingae/isolation & purification
Neisseriaceae Infections/diagnosis
Neisseriaceae Infections/epidemiology
Osteomyelitis/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Arthritis, Infectious/diagnostic imaging
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Odds Ratio
Oropharynx/microbiology
Osteomyelitis/diagnostic imaging
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Switzerland
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1503/cmaj.170127

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[PMID]: 28661965
[Au] Autor:Lironi C; Steiger C; Juchler C; Spyropoulou V; Samara E; Ceroni D
[Ad] Address:From the *Pediatric Emergency Service, and †Pediatric Orthopedic Service, Child and Adolescent Department, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Pyogenic Tenosynovitis in Infants: A Case Series.
[So] Source:Pediatr Infect Dis J;36(11):1097-1099, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0987
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pyogenic tenosynovitis is an uncommon condition in children, and there are few published case reports. We present a series of 11 cases who were treated in the Geneva Children Hospital in the last 10 years. Kingella kingae was the main pathogen, and the characteristics of infection (inflammatory indices, clinical findings and severity) are similar to other osteoarticular K. kingae infections in infants.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Kingella kingae
Neisseriaceae Infections
Tenosynovitis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Infant
Kingella kingae/genetics
Kingella kingae/isolation & purification
Kingella kingae/pathogenicity
Male
Molecular Typing
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170630
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000001673

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[PMID]: 28650419
[Au] Autor:Fernandes Machado SA; Ferreira Freitas JM; Alegrete da Silva NP; Coutinho Costa Moreira JM; Peixoto Pinto RA; de Melo Costa FG
[Ad] Address:From the *Orthopaedic Department, Centro Hospitalar de São João, Porto, Portugal; and †Anatomy Institute and ‡Orthopaedic Department, Oporto University, Porto, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Spondylodiscitis by Kingella Kingae: An Emerging Pathogen in an Older Pediatric Population.
[So] Source:Pediatr Infect Dis J;36(11):1096-1097, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0987
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In children, greater than 95% of Kingella kingae infections are diagnosed between 6 and 48 months of age. K. kingae has not been systematically investigated, especially in older children. We describe a case of spondylodiscitis by K. kingae in an 8-year-old child.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Discitis
Kingella kingae
Neisseriaceae Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Child
Communicable Diseases, Emerging
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170627
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000001666

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[PMID]: 28432046
[Au] Autor:Hourston GJ; Kankam HK; Mitchell PD; Latimer MD
[Ad] Address:University of Cambridge Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, UK.
[Ti] Title:Brodie abscess of the femoral capital epiphysis in a 2-year-old child caused by .
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2017, 2017 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of a Brodie abscess of the femoral capital epiphysis from which was isolated. This is to the best of our knowledge the first report of a Brodie abscess of the femoral capital epiphysis from which was isolated.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Epiphyses/microbiology
Femur/microbiology
Kingella kingae/isolation & purification
Neisseriaceae Infections/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abscess/microbiology
Abscess/surgery
Child, Preschool
Epiphyses/diagnostic imaging
Femur/diagnostic imaging
Femur/surgery
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neisseriaceae Infections/surgery
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170628
[Lr] Last revision date:170628
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170423
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28328799
[Au] Autor:Noguera-Julian M; Guillén Y; Peterson J; Reznik D; Harris EV; Joseph SJ; Rivera J; Kannanganat S; Amara R; Nguyen ML; Mutembo S; Paredes R; Read TD; Marconi VC
[Ad] Address:aIrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, Badalona bUniversity Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra cUniversity de Vic-University Central de Catalunya, Vic, Catalonia, Spain dDivision of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine eInfectious Diseases Program, Grady Health System fDepartment of Biology, Emory University, O. Wayne Rollins Research Center gDepartment of Global Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA hMinistry of Health, Zambia iUnitat VIH, Hosp. University Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Catalonia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Oral microbiome in HIV-associated periodontitis.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(12):e5821, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:HIV-associated periodontal diseases (PD) could serve as a source of chronic inflammation. Here, we sought to characterize the oral microbial signatures of HIV+ and HIV- individuals at different levels of PD severity.This cross-sectional study included both HIV+ and HIV- patients with varying degrees of PD. Two tooth, 2 cheek, and 1 saliva samples were obtained for microbiome analysis. Mothur/SILVADB were used to classify sequences. R/Bioconductor (Vegan, PhyloSeq, and DESeq2) was employed to assess overall microbiome structure differences and differential abundance of bacterial genera between groups. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to assess immune activation in CD4 and CD8 cell populations.Around 250 cheek, tooth, and saliva samples from 50 participants (40 HIV+ and 10 HIV-) were included. Severity of PD was classified clinically as None/Mild (N), Moderate (M), and Severe (S) with 18 (36%), 16 (32%), and 16 (32%) participants in each category, respectively. Globally, ordination analysis demonstrated clustering by anatomic site (R2 = 0.25, P < 0.001). HIV status and PD severity showed a statistically significant impact on microbiome composition but only accounted for a combined 2% of variation. HIV+ samples were enriched in genera Abiotrophia, Neisseria, Kingella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae and depleted in Leptotrichia and Selenomonas. The Neisseria genus was consistently enriched in HIV+ participants regardless of sampling site and PD level. Immune markers were altered in HIV+ participants but did not show association with the oral microbiome.HIV-associated changes in oral microbiome result in subtle microbial signatures along different stages of PD that are common in independent oral anatomic sites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
HIV Infections/microbiology
Microbiota
Mouth/microbiology
Periodontitis/complications
Periodontitis/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes
Cheek/microbiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Flow Cytometry
HIV Infections/drug therapy
HIV Infections/immunology
Humans
Male
Periodontitis/immunology
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Saliva/microbiology
Severity of Illness Index
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Retroviral Agents); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170410
[Lr] Last revision date:170410
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170323
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000005821

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[PMID]: 28161435
[Au] Autor:Wang Z; Zhu J; Liu Z; Liu Y; Zheng N; Feng M; Chen Q; Yu W; Jiang L; Hu J
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.
[Ti] Title:Multi-locus sequence typing of Laribacter hongkongensis isolates from freshwater animals, environment and diarrhea patients in southern China.
[So] Source:Int J Food Microbiol;245:98-104, 2017 Mar 20.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3460
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Laribacter hongkongensis is a novel emerging bacterium associated with gastroenteritis and invasive bacteremic infections. Freshwater fish and edible frogs have been identified as major reservoirs of L. hongkongensis. Currently one of the main challenges in L. hongkongensis research is to identify their sources and possible transmission routes. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity and relatedness of these L. hongkongensis isolates to their hosts in the hope of shedding light on these issues. In this study, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) was used to determine the genetic characteristics of 114 L. hongkongensis strains, including 113 isolated from humans, fish, frogs, Amazonian snails and water sample in Guangzhou and Jiangmen, Southern China, and one reference isolate HZ242, recovered from a diarrhea patient in Hangzhou. The relationships among the STs and the relatedness among the isolates were assessed by phylogenetic and eBURST analysis. A total of 72 different sequence types (STs) from 114 isolates of L. hongkongensis were identified by MLST analysis, and ST99-ST161were novel. Significant difference of the prevalence of different STs between fish isolates (41.8%, 23/55) and frog isolates (82.4%, 42/51) was revealed (p=0.000). The most frequent ST (ST45) was identified 28 times and only found in fish isolates. In addition, 10 groups were identified by eBURST in this study. Combined the MLST data from Hong Kong and the present study, there were eight eBRUST lineages (group A-H) included the isolates (49.2%, 128/260) from either numerous hosts or multiple geographic origins, which contained 33.1% (53/160) of all the STs. Group A (n=57, STs=20) consisted exclusively of isolates from fish and 92.9% (39/42) of isolates in group B (n=42, STs=16) were only from fish. Group C-F (n=22, STs=14) were found to be associated with human, apart from other hosts. In this study, extensive genetic heterogeneity among the L. hongkongensis isolates from various hosts was observed. Specifically, there is higher genetic diversity of L. hongkongensis isolates of frog-origin than those of fish-origin. This study indicated some isolates exhibited a preference for specific hosts or geographic areas. ST45 was revealed to be the most frequent ST, which was only found in the fish isolates in Southern China, but might be irrelative to human infection. This MLST study further revealed that frog was likely to be another major source for human infection with L. hongkongensis apart from fish.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diarrhea/microbiology
Fishes/microbiology
Fresh Water/microbiology
Neisseriaceae/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
China
Computational Biology
Gastroenteritis/microbiology
Humans
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170531
[Lr] Last revision date:170531
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 890 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28085929
[Au] Autor:Kong HK; Law HW; Liu X; Law CO; Pan Q; Gao L; Xiong L; Lau SK; Woo PC; Lau TC
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptomic Analysis of Laribacter hongkongensis Reveals Adaptive Response Coupled with Temperature.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(1):e0169998, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bacterial adaptation to different hosts requires transcriptomic alteration in response to the environmental conditions. Laribacter hongkongensis is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, urease-positive bacillus caused infections in liver cirrhosis patients and community-acquired gastroenteritis. It was also found in intestine from commonly consumed freshwater fishes and drinking water reservoirs. Since L. hongkongensis could survive as either fish or human pathogens, their survival mechanisms in two different habitats should be temperature-regulated and highly complex. Therefore, we performed transcriptomic analysis of L. hongkongensis at body temperatures of fish and human in order to elucidate the versatile adaptation mechanisms coupled with the temperatures. We identified numerous novel temperature-induced pathways involved in host pathogenesis, in addition to the shift of metabolic equilibriums and overexpression of stress-related proteins. Moreover, these pathways form a network that can be activated at a particular temperature, and change the physiology of the bacteria to adapt to the environments. In summary, the dynamic of transcriptomes in L. hongkongensis provides versatile strategies for the bacterial survival at different habitats and this alteration prepares the bacterium for the challenge of host immunity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adaptation, Physiological/genetics
Biomarkers/metabolism
Gastroenteritis/genetics
Genome, Bacterial
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods
Neisseriaceae/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Gastroenteritis/microbiology
Humans
Neisseriaceae/isolation & purification
RNA, Bacterial/genetics
Stress, Physiological
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (RNA, Bacterial)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170808
[Lr] Last revision date:170808
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170114
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169998


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