Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Nematode and Infections [Words]
References found : 11134 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29524548
[Au] Autor:Islam W; Qasim M; Noman A; Adnan M; Tayyab M; Farooq TH; Wei H; Wang L
[Ad] Address:College of Plant Protection, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002, China; Govt. of Punjab, Agriculture Department, Lahore, Pakistan. Electronic address: ddoapsial@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Plant microRNAs: Front line players against invading pathogens.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plants are attacked by a large number of pathogens. To defend against these pathogens, plants activate or repress a vast array of genes. For genetic expression and reprogramming, host endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) are the key factors. Among these sRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) mediate gene regulation through RNA silencing at the post-transcriptional level and play an essential role in the defense responses to biotic and abiotic stress. In the recent years, high-throughput sequencing has enabled the researchers to uncover the role of plant miRNAs during pathogen invasion. So here we have reviewed the recent research findings illustrating the plant miRNAs active involvement in various defense processes during fungal, bacterial, viral and nematode infections. However, rapid validation of direct targets of miRNAs is the dire need of time, which can be very helpful in improving the plant resistance against various pathogenic diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523134
[Au] Autor:Váradyová Z; Mravcáková D; Babják M; Bryszak M; Gresáková L; Cobanová K; Kisidayová S; Plachá I; Königová A; Cieslak A; Slusarczyk S; Pecio L; Kowalczyk M; Várady M
[Ad] Address:Institute of Animal Physiology, Centre of Biosciences, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Soltésovej 4-6, 040 01, Kosice, Slovak Republic.
[Ti] Title:Effects of herbal nutraceuticals and/or zinc against Haemonchus contortus in lambs experimentally infected.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):78, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The gastrointestinal parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus is a pathogenic organism resistant to several anthelmintics. This study assessed the efficacy of a medicinal herbal mixture (Herbmix) and organic zinc, as an essential trace element for the proper functioning of both unspecific and specific immune defensive mechanisms, against experimental infections with H. contortus in lambs. All lambs were infected orally with approximately 5000 third-stage larvae of a strain of H. contortus susceptible to anthelmintics (MHco1). Twenty-four female lambs 3-4 months of age were divided into four groups: unsupplemented animals (control), animals supplemented with Herbmix (Hmix), animals supplemented with organic zinc (Zn) and animals supplemented with Herbmix and organic zinc (Hmix+Zn). Eggs per gram (EPG) of faeces were quantified 20, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 62 and 70 d post-infection and mean abomasal worm counts were assessed 70 d post-infection. Samples of blood were collected from each animal 7, 35, 49 and 70 d post-infection. RESULTS: Quantitative analyses of the bioactive compounds in Herbmix identified three main groups: flavonoids (9964.7 µg/g), diterpenes (4886.1 µg/g) and phenolic acids (3549.2 µg/g). Egg counts in the lambs treated with Hmix, Zn and Hmix+Zn decreased after 49 d. The EPGs in the Zn and Hmix+Zn groups were significantly lower on day 56 (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), and the EPGs and mean worm counts were significantly lower on day 70 in all supplemented groups (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). Hemograms of complete red blood cells of each animal identified clinical signs of haemonchosis after day 35. Serum calprotectin concentrations and IgA levels were significantly affected by treatment. The treatment influenced serum malondialdehyde concentrations (P < 0.05) and sulfhydryl groups (P < 0.01) of antioxidant status. The mineral status was unaltered in all lambs. CONCLUSION: A direct anthelmintic impact on the viability of nematodes was not fully demonstrated, but the treatments with herbal nutraceuticals and zinc likely indirectly contributed to the increase in the resistance of the lambs to nematode infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1405-4

  3 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522800
[Au] Autor:Gahoi S; Singh S; Gautam B
[Ad] Address:Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Allahabad 211007, India. Electronic address: shachigahoimbi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Genome-wide identification and comprehensive analysis of excretory/secretory proteins in nematodes provide potential drug targets for parasite control.
[So] Source:Genomics;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1089-8646
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nematodes are responsible for causing severe diseases in plants, humans and other animals. Infection is associated with the release of excretory/secretory (ES) proteins into host cytoplasm and interference with the host immune system which make them attractive targets for therapeutic use. The identification of ES proteins through bioinformatics approaches is cost- and time-effective and could be used for screening of potential targets for parasitic diseases for further experimental studies. Here, we identified and functionally annotated 93,949 ES proteins, in the genome of 73 nematodes using integration of various bioinformatics tools. 30.6% of ES proteins were supported at RNA level. The predicted ES proteins, annotated by gene ontology terms, domains, pathways, proteases and enzyme class analysis were enriched in molecular functions of proteases, protease inhibitors, c-type lectin and hydrolases which are strongly associated with typical functions of ES proteins. We identified a total of 492 ES proteins from human and plant parasitic nematodes, homologues to DrugBank-approved targets and C. elegans RNA interference gene database which could represent potential targets for parasite control. This comprehensive analysis of nematode secretome provide valuable resource for further experimental studies to understand host-pathogen interactions and novel therapeutic solutions for parasitic infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518091
[Au] Autor:Leung JM; Budischak SA; Chung The H; Hansen C; Bowcutt R; Neill R; Shellman M; Loke P; Graham AL
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Rapid environmental effects on gut nematode susceptibility in rewilded mice.
[So] Source:PLoS Biol;16(3):e2004108, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1545-7885
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Genetic and environmental factors shape host susceptibility to infection, but how and how rapidly environmental variation might alter the susceptibility of mammalian genotypes remains unknown. Here, we investigate the impacts of seminatural environments upon the nematode susceptibility profiles of inbred C57BL/6 mice. We hypothesized that natural exposure to microbes might directly (e.g., via trophic interactions) or indirectly (e.g., via microbe-induced immune responses) alter the hatching, growth, and survival of nematodes in mice housed outdoors. We found that while C57BL/6 mice are resistant to high doses of nematode (Trichuris muris) eggs under clean laboratory conditions, exposure to outdoor environments significantly increased their susceptibility to infection, as evidenced by increased worm burdens and worm biomass. Indeed, mice kept outdoors harbored as many worms as signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) knockout mice, which are genetically deficient in the type 2 immune response essential for clearing nematodes. Using 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing of fecal samples, we discovered enhanced microbial diversity and specific bacterial taxa predictive of nematode burden in outdoor mice. We also observed decreased type 2 and increased type 1 immune responses in lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from infected mice residing outdoors. Importantly, in our experimental design, different groups of mice received nematode eggs either before or after moving outdoors. This contrasting timing of rewilding revealed that enhanced hatching of worms was not sufficient to explain the increased worm burdens; instead, microbial enhancement and type 1 immune facilitation of worm growth and survival, as hypothesized, were also necessary to explain our results. These findings demonstrate that environment can rapidly and significantly shape gut microbial communities and mucosal responses to nematode infections, leading to variation in parasite expulsion rates among genetically similar hosts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.2004108

  5 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29341868
[Au] Autor:Zhao W; Zhou X; Lei H; Fan J; Yang R; Li Z; Hu C; Li M; Zhao F; Wang S
[Ad] Address:Beijing Key Laboratory for Agricultural Applications and New Techniques, Plant Science and Technology College, Beijing University of Agriculture , Beijing , China.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptional evidence for cross talk between JA and ET or SA during root-knot nematode invasion in tomato.
[So] Source:Physiol Genomics;50(3):197-207, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1531-2267
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:studies have demonstrated that jasmonic acid (JA) reduces root-knot nematode (RKN) infections in tomato plants. RKN invasion is sensed by roots, and root-derived JA signaling activates systemic defense responses, though this is poorly understood. Here, we investigate variations in the RKN-induced transcriptome in scion phloem between two tomato plant grafts: CM/CM ( Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. cv. Castlemart) and CM/ spr2 (a JA-deficient mutant). A total of 8,716 genes were differentially expressed in the scion phloem of the plants with JA-deficient rootstock via RNA sequencing. Among these genes, 535 upregulated and 153 downregulated genes with high copy numbers were identified as significantly differentially expressed. Among them, 34 predicted transcription factor genes were identified. Additionally, we used real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the expression patterns of 42 genes involved in the JA, ethylene, or salicylic acid pathway in phloem under RKN infection. The results suggested that in the absence of JA signaling, the ET signaling pathway is enhanced after RKN infection; however, alterations in the SA signaling pathway were not observed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00079.2017

  6 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505582
[Au] Autor:Lima NF; Gonçalves-Lopes RM; Kruize YCM; Yazdanbakhsh M; Ferreira MU
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:CD39 and immune regulation in a chronic helminth infection: The puzzling case of Mansonella ozzardi.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006327, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infections typically induce an immunoregulatory environment, with markedly reduced immune responses to both parasite-specific and unrelated bystander antigens. Here we tested whether these changes are also observed in human infections with Mansonella ozzardi, a neglected filarial nematode widely distributed across Latin America. METHODS: CD4+ T cell populations from microfilaremic (Fil+) and uninfected (Fil-) inhabitants in M. ozzardi-endemic riverine communities in Brazil were characterized by flow cytometry analysis. Plasma concentrations of a wide range of cytokines and chemokines were measured. We examined whether M. ozzardi infection is associated with suppressed in vitro lymphoproliferative and inflammatory cytokine responses upon stimulation with filarial antigen, unrelated antigens or mitogens. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: Fil+ subjects had lower plasma levels of selected inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6, than their Fil- counterparts. However, we found no evidence for attenuated T-cell responses to filarial antigens or co-endemic pathogens, such as malaria parasites and Toxoplasma gondii. CD4+ T cells expressing CD39, an ectonucleosidase involved in the generation of the anti-inflammatory molecule adenosine, were increased in frequency in Fil+ subjects, compared to uninfected controls. Significantly, such an expansion was directly proportional to microfilarial loads. Surprisingly, CD39 blocking with a neutralizing antibody suppressed antigen-driven lymphoproliferation in vitro, while decreasing inflammatory cytokine responses, in Fil+ and Fil- individuals. These findings suggest that circulating CD4+ CD39+ T cells comprise subsets with both regulatory and stimulatory roles that contribute to the immune homeostasis in chronic M. ozzardi infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006327

  7 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29466376
[Au] Autor:Yadav S; Frazer J; Banga A; Pruitt K; Harsh S; Jaenike J; Eleftherianos I
[Ad] Address:Infection and Innate Immunity Lab, Department of Biological Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Endosymbiont-based immunity in Drosophila melanogaster against parasitic nematode infection.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192183, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts represent a complex ecosystem within organisms ranging from humans to protozoa. Drosophila species are known to naturally harbor Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts, which play a protective role against certain microbial infections. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence of endosymbionts affects the immune response of Drosophila melanogaster larvae to infection by Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes carrying or lacking their mutualistic Gram-negative bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila (symbiotic or axenic nematodes, respectively). We find that the presence of Wolbachia alone or together with Spiroplasma promotes the survival of larvae in response to infection with S. carpocapsae symbiotic nematodes, but not against axenic nematodes. We also find that Wolbachia numbers are reduced in Spiroplasma-free larvae infected with axenic compared to symbiotic nematodes, and they are also reduced in Spiroplasma-containing compared to Spiroplasma-free larvae infected with axenic nematodes. We further show that S. carpocapsae axenic nematode infection induces the Toll pathway in the absence of Wolbachia, and that symbiotic nematode infection leads to increased phenoloxidase activity in D. melanogaster larvae devoid of endosymbionts. Finally, infection with either type of nematode alters the metabolic status and the fat body lipid droplet size in D. melanogaster larvae containing only Wolbachia or both endosymbionts. Our results suggest an interaction between Wolbachia endosymbionts with the immune response of D. melanogaster against infection with the entomopathogenic nematodes S. carpocapsae. Results from this study indicate a complex interplay between insect hosts, endosymbiotic microbes and pathogenic organisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192183

  8 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29420571
[Au] Autor:Sinnathamby G; Henderson G; Umair S; Janssen P; Bland R; Simpson H
[Ad] Address:Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:The bacterial community associated with the sheep gastrointestinal nematode parasite Haemonchus contortus.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192164, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Culture-independent methods were used to study the microbiota of adult worms, third-stage larvae and eggs, both in faeces and laid in vitro, of Haemonchus contortus, a nematode parasite of the abomasa of ruminants which is a major cause of production losses and ill-health. Bacteria were identified in eggs, the female reproductive tract and the gut of adult and third-stage larvae (L3). PCR amplification of 16S rRNA sequences, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone libraries were used to compare the composition of the microbial communities of the different life-cycle stages of the parasites, as well as parasites and their natural environments. The microbiomes of adult worms and L3 were different from those in the abomasum or faeces respectively. The H. contortus microbiota was mainly comprised of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Bacteria were localised in the gut, inside eggs and within the uterus of adult female worms using the universal FISH Eub338 probe, which targets most bacteria, and were also seen in these tissues by light and transmission electron microscopy. Streptococcus/Lactococcus sp. were identified within the distal uterus with the probe Strc493. Sequences from the genera Weissella and Leuconostoc were found in all life-cycle stages, except eggs collected from faeces, in which most sequences belonged to Clostridium sp. Bacteria affiliated with Weissella/Leuconostoc were identified in both PCR-DGGE short sequences and clone libraries of nearly full length 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in all life-cycle stages and subsequently visualised in eggs by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) with group-specific probes. This strongly suggests they are vertically transmitted endosymbionts. As this study was carried out on a parasite strain which has been maintained in the laboratory, other field isolates will need to be examined to establish whether these bacteria are more widely dispersed and have potential as targets to control H. contortus infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192164

  9 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29256428
[Au] Autor:Morell M; Lehnert K; IJsseldijk LL; Raverty SA; Wohlsein P; Gröne A; André M; Siebert U; Shadwick RE
[Ad] Address:Zoology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T1Z4, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Parasites in the inner ear of harbour porpoise: cases from the North and Baltic Seas.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;127(1):57-63, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peribullar sinuses of harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena are parasitized with high prevalence by the nematode Stenurus minor. The effect of S. minor on the hearing ability of this species is still undetermined. Here, we review the occurrence of S. minor in the inner ear of harbour porpoises recovered from strandings in the North and Baltic Seas. In particular, we present the results from ears collected in German and Danish waters from 2002 to 2016 and from Dutch waters from 2010 to 2016. While the prevalence of S. minor in pterygoid and peribullar sinuses and tympanic cavity was high in harbour porpoises (66.67% in our cases), its prevalence in the cochlea was rare. Only 1 case out of 129 analysed by either histology, electron microscopy or immunofluorescence showed the presence of a nematode parasite morphologically consistent with S. minor at the most basal portion of the right cochlea. This individual also had severe haemorrhage along the right cochlear spiral, which was likely caused by ectopic S. minor migration. Although this animal might have had impaired hearing in the right ear, it was otherwise in good body condition with evidence of recent feeding. These findings highlight the need to study the effect of parasites on hearing, and other pathological changes that might impair appropriate processing of acoustic information.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Labyrinth Diseases/veterinary
Nematode Infections/veterinary
Phocoena/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ear, Inner/parasitology
Ear, Inner/ultrastructure
Labyrinth Diseases/epidemiology
Labyrinth Diseases/parasitology
Nematoda/classification
Nematoda/isolation & purification
Nematode Infections/epidemiology
Nematode Infections/parasitology
North Sea/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao03178

  10 / 11134 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29256427
[Au] Autor:Ten Doeschate MTI; IJsseldijk LL; Hiemstra S; de Jong EA; Strijkstra A; Gröne A; Begeman L
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathobiology, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL Utrecht, Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Quantifying parasite presence in relation to biological parameters of harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena stranded on the Dutch coast.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;127(1):49-56, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Harbour porpoises are often found to be infected by endoparasites in several organs including the lungs and stomach as well as the heart, liver and ears. Nevertheless there is still little knowledge about the impact, ecology, transmission, and virulence of these parasitic infections. Here, we profile the presence of parasites in 4 frequently infected organs (lungs, stomach, liver and ears) in relation to biological parameters of harbour porpoises stranded along the Dutch coastline between December 2008 and December 2013. We found that parasites were common, with prevalence of 68% in lungs, 74.4% in ears, 26% in stomach and 23.5% in liver. We used generalised linear models to further quantify parasite presence in relation to biological data gathered during necropsy (sex, body length and nutritive condition). Body length (used as a proxy for age) was significant in explaining parasite presence for all organs with increasing probability of having the parasite with increasing body length. For the parasitic infections in the ears and stomach the nutritive condition was an additional significant factor, with a higher probability of parasite presence in porpoises in a poorer nutritive condition. The results of this study can be used as a baseline for assessing parasite presence in harbour porpoises and are a first step towards linking parasite infections to basic biological data gathered during necropsy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Parasitic Diseases, Animal/parasitology
Phocoena/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ear Diseases/parasitology
Ear Diseases/veterinary
Liver Diseases/parasitology
Liver Diseases/veterinary
Lung Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
Netherlands
Parasitic Diseases, Animal/pathology
Stomach Diseases/parasitology
Stomach Diseases/veterinary
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao03182


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