Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Nephrolithiasis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29486147
[Au] Autor:Claverie-Martin F; Trujillo-Suarez J; Gonzalez-Acosta H; Aparicio C; Justa Roldan ML; Stiburkova B; Ichida K; Martín-Gomez MA; Herrero Goñi M; Carrasco Hidalgo-Barquero M; Iñigo V; Enriquez R; Cordoba-Lanus E; Garcia-Nieto VM; RenalTube Group
[Ad] Address:Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain. Electronic address: fclamar@gobiernodecanarias.org.
[Ti] Title:URAT1 and GLUT9 mutations in Spanish patients with renal hypouricemia.
[So] Source:Clin Chim Acta;481:83-89, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3492
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Renal hypouricemia (RHUC), a rare inherited disorder characterized by impaired uric acid (UA) reabsorption in the proximal tubule, is caused by mutations in SLC22A12 or SLC2A9. Most mutations have been identified in Japanese patients, and only a few have been detected in Europeans. METHODS: We report clinical, biochemical and genetics findings of fourteen Spanish patients, six Caucasians and eight of Roma ethnia, diagnosed with idiopathic RHUC. Two of the patients presented exercise-induced acute renal failure and another one had several episodes of nephrolithiasis and four of them had progressive deterioration of renal function, while the rest were asymptomatic. RESULTS: Molecular analysis revealed SLC22A12 mutations in ten of the patients, and SLC2A9 mutations in the other four. A new heterozygous SLC22A12 missense mutation, c.1427C>A (p.A476D), was identified in two affected members of the same family. The rest of the patients presented homozygous, heterozygous or compound heterozygous mutations that have been previously identified in patients with RHUC; SLC22A12 p.T467M and p.L415_G417del, and SLC2A9 p.T125M. Expression studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that c.1427C>A reduced UA transport but did not alter the location of URAT1 protein on the plasma membrane. CONCLUSIONS: The biochemical and clinical features of our patients together with the genetic analysis results confirmed the diagnosis of RHUC. This is the first report describing SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 mutations in Spanish patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29522867
[Au] Autor:Papagiannopoulos D; Holst D; Bechis SK; Sur RL
[Ad] Address:University of California San Diego, Department of Urology. Electronic address: dpapagi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A Homeopathic Alternative to Potassium Citrate in Patients with Recurrent Nephrolithiasis.
[So] Source:Urology;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1527-9995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 5050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376607
[Au] Autor:Olefir YV; Yavorskii AN; Butnaru DV; Shatalova OV; Gorbatenko VS; Gerasimenko AS
[Ad] Address:I.M. Sechenov First MSMU, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Idiopathic hypercalciuria. Diagnosis and treatment].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):112-119, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:Most patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria and calcium nephrolithiasis have a family history of the disease. Idiopathic hypercalciuria is a metabolic abnormality with various causes and developmental pathways. The systematic review describes specific mutations associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis. Detection of these mutations may provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous disease and personalize patient management depending on the detected polymorphisms. A promising treatment option for a mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene is thiazide diuretics in combination with bisphosphonates. Among bisphosphonates, the drug of choice which has been most strongly supported by research evidence is alendronate.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alendronate/therapeutic use
Mutation
Nephrolithiasis
Receptors, Calcitriol
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Hypercalciuria/diagnosis
Hypercalciuria/drug therapy
Hypercalciuria/genetics
Hypercalciuria/metabolism
Male
Nephrolithiasis/diagnosis
Nephrolithiasis/drug therapy
Nephrolithiasis/genetics
Nephrolithiasis/metabolism
Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics
Receptors, Calcitriol/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Receptors, Calcitriol); X1J18R4W8P (Alendronate)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29520723
[Au] Autor:Ergul AB; Kara M; Karakukcu C; Tasdemir A; Aslaner H; Ergul MA; Muhtaroglu S; Zararsiz GE; Torun YA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, University of Health Sciences, Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey. abergul@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:High Doses of Boron Have No Protective Effect Against Nephrolithiasis or Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model.
[So] Source:Biol Trace Elem Res;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1559-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Boron plays roles in the metabolism of calcium, vitamin D, steroid hormones, healthy bone development, and maintenance of cell membranes. The biological effects of boron are dose-dependent but follow a U-shaped pattern, rendering it important to define the active range. The studies of Bahadoran et al. on rats and Naghii et al. on humans showed that low doses of boron (3 and 10 mg/day) prevented kidney stone formation. The aim of this study was to determine whether high doses of boron have an anti-urolithiatic or antioxidant effect on nephrolithiasis in an experimental rat model. The study was conducted on 50 adult male Wistar rats randomized to five groups. Nephrolithiasis was induced with water containing 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG) and 2% ammonium chloride (AC). This treatment was given to animals in all groups for 10 days, except the positive and negative controls. Simultaneously, groups 2, 3, and 4 were given boric acid via gavage at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 4/8/16 mg boron respectively) as the source of boron. Animals in the negative and positive control groups were given 6 µL/g distilled water without boric acid. At day 10, intra-cardiac blood samples were drawn from all animals. The right and left kidneys were removed for biochemical and histopathological examinations, respectively. The groups were compared with respect to serum urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphorous, total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), serum paraoxonase (PON1) activity, tissue calcium and oxalate levels, and stone burden as determined by histopathological examination. Serum urea and creatinine levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively), while serum calcium and phosphorous levels were significantly lower (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), in animals given EG/AC compared to negative controls. No significant differences were detected in serum calcium, phosphorous, urea, or creatinine levels between animals treated with boron and positive controls (p > 0.05). Serum PON1 activity was significantly lower in animals given EG/AC than in negative controls (p < 0.001), while no significant difference in serum PON1 level was detected between rats treated with boron and positive controls. No significant differences were detected in vitamin D, TAS, TOS, tissue calcium, or tissue oxalate levels among groups. No stone formation was detected on histopathological examination in negative controls. No significant differences were found in stone formation between rats treated with boron and positive controls. Based on this study, high doses of boron had no protective effect against nephrolithiasis and oxidative stress.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12011-018-1294-1

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[PMID]: 29518971
[Au] Autor:Nirumand MC; Hajialyani M; Rahimi R; Farzaei MH; Zingue S; Nabavi SM; Bishayee A
[Ad] Address:Office of Persian Medicine, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran 1467664961, Iran. mina_nirumand@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Dietary Plants for the Prevention and Management of Kidney Stones: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence and Molecular Mechanisms.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Sci;19(3), 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1422-0067
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Kidney stones are one of the oldest known and common diseases in the urinary tract system. Various human studies have suggested that diets with a higher intake of vegetables and fruits play a role in the prevention of kidney stones. In this review, we have provided an overview of these dietary plants, their main chemical constituents, and their possible mechanisms of action. (green tea), (raspberry), (common madder), (parsley), (pomegranate), (mastic), (yellow-fruit nightshade), (stinging nettle), ( ), (khella), (black-cumin), (roselle), and (oregano) have received considerable interest based on scientific evidence. Beside these dietary plants, phytochemicals-such as catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, diosmin, rutin, quercetin, hyperoside, and curcumin-as antioxidant dietary phyto-phenols were found to be effective for the prevention of urolithiasis (the process of stone formation in the urinary tract). The main underlying mechanisms of these dietary plants and their isolated phytonutrients in the management of urolithiasis include diuretic, antispasmodic, and antioxidant activity, as well as an inhibitory effect on crystallization, nucleation, and aggregation of crystals. The results as presented in this review demonstrate the promising role of dietary plants and phytophenols in the prevention and management of kidney stones. Further investigations are required to confirm the safety and efficacy of these compounds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29508081
[Au] Autor:Talwar R; Ziemba J
[Ad] Address:Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Urology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, 3rd Floor, West Pavilion, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. ruchika.talwar@uphs.upenn.edu.
[Ti] Title:Validated Methods of Assessing Quality of Life in Stone Disease.
[So] Source:Curr Urol Rep;19(4):25, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6285
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the emphasis on quality standards when determining reimbursements rates, patient reported outcomes are now of particular interest to clinicians. This review addresses health-related quality of life (HRQOL) detriments that have been studied in patients with stone disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several instruments been validated for use in stone formers. Previously, generic instruments revealed decreased HRQOL in urolithiasis patients. Recently, a disease-specific tool has been developed and has provided more insight into the specific symptoms that negatively affect the patient experience. Evidence now reveals lower HRQOL in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with calculi, as well as varying determinants after certain interventions. Disease-specific tools have been shown to be more sensitive to urologic-related complaints. These findings should be considered in management decisions to allow for patient-centered care. Further application and standardization of these assessment tools into prospective studies may have value in refining current treatment guidelines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11934-018-0776-1

  7 / 5050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516386
[Au] Autor:Meola A; Vignali E; Matrone A; Cetani F; Marcocci C
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical and Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56127, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety of long-term management of patients with chronic post-surgical hypoparathyroidism.
[So] Source:J Endocrinol Invest;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1720-8386
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate adherence to European Society of Endocrinology guidelines and risk of renal complications in patients with chronic post-operative hypoparathyroidism (PO-HypoPT) treated with calcium and activated vitamin D metabolites. METHODS: We evaluated 90 adult patients (68 females and 22 males) with chronic (3 years) PO-HypoPT. Total albumin-corrected (Alb-Ca) and ionized serum calcium, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, and 24-h urinary calcium were measured; renal ultrasound was also performed. Healthy hospital employers (n = 142) were used as control. RESULTS: Complete data were available in 82 patients. Twenty-eight (34.1%) met four targets (Alb-Ca, phosphate, calcium phosphate product and 24-h urinary calcium), 36 (43.9%) three, 17 (20.7%) two, and 1 (1.2%) one. Thirteen (14.4%) had Alb-Ca value below and 18 (20.0%) above the target range and 54.9% 24-h urinary calcium above the upper normal limit. Seven (7.7%) has increased serum phosphate and none an increased calcium phosphate product. Eleven (12.2%) patients had eGFR < 60 mL/min × 1.73 m . Nephrolithiasis was present in 27 (30%) patients. Compared with the controls, patients had lower Alb-Ca (8.9 ± 0.5 vs. 9.5 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P 0.0001) and a higher rate of kidney stones, mostly asymptomatic [27/90 (30%) vs 7/142 (5%), P < 0.0001, odd ratio 8.2 (3.4-19.9)]. Fifty-seven patients had ≥ four serum Ca determinations during follow-up. Forty (70.2) patients had values within the target range in > 50% of cases, 18 in > 75%, and only 2 in 100%. Two patients never had values in the target range. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of chronic PO-HypoPT with calcium and activated vitamin D metabolites is suboptimal and associated with an increased risk of renal complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40618-018-0857-5

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[PMID]: 29510180
[Au] Autor:Leonardo S; Pietro FM; Giovanni G; Salvatore B; Marco D
[Ad] Address:Division of Nephrology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI, Italy. Electronic address: leonardo.spatola@humanitas.it.
[Ti] Title:Metabolic Syndrome and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Insulin Resistance in Focus.
[So] Source:Metabolism;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8600
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Uric acid nephrolithiasis (UAN) is an increasingly common disease in ethnically diverse populations and constitutes about 10% of all kidney stones. Metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are accounted amongst the major risk factors for UAN, together with environmental exposure, individual lifestyle habits and genetic predisposition. The development and overt manifestation of UAN appears to stem on the background of insulin resistance, which acts at the kidney level by reducing urinary pH, thus hampering the ability of the kidney to generate renal ammonium in response to an acid load. Unduly acidic urinary pH and overt UAN are both considered renal manifestations of insulin resistance. The mechanisms underlying increased endogenous acid production and/or defective ammonium excretion are yet to be completely understood. Although the development of UAN and, more in general, of kidney stones largely recognizes modifiable individual determining factors, the rising prevalence of diabetes, obesity and accompanying metabolic disorders calls for the identification of novel therapeutic approaches and intervention targets. This review aims at providing an updated picture of existing evidence on the relationship between insulin resistance and UAN in the context of metabolic syndrome and in light of the most recent advancements in our understanding of its genetic signature.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 5050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29434367
[Au] Autor:Kelsey R
[Ti] Title:Stones: Individual gut microbiome in nephrolithiasis.
[So] Source:Nat Rev Urol;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1759-4820
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/nrurol.2018.16

  10 / 5050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29488355
[Au] Autor:Aksenov S; Peck CC; Eriksson UG; Stanski DR
[Ad] Address:Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology, Early Clinical Development, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Waltham, MA.
[Ti] Title:Individualized treatment strategies for hyperuricemia informed by a semi-mechanistic exposure-response model of uric acid dynamics.
[So] Source:Physiol Rep;6(5), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2051-817X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To provide insight into pharmacological treatment of hyperuricemia we developed a semi-mechanistic, dynamical model of uric acid (UA) disposition in human. Our model represents the hyperuricemic state in terms of production of UA (rate, PUA), its renal filtration (glomerular filtration rate, GFR) and proximal tubular reabsorption (fractional excretion coefficient, FE). Model parameters were estimated using data from 9 Phase I studies of xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOI) allopurinol and febuxostat and a novel uricosuric, the selective UA reabsorption inhibitor lesinurad, approved for use in combination with a XOI. The model was qualified for prediction of the effect of patients' GFR and FE on concentration of UA in serum (sUA) and UA excretion in urine and their response to drug treatment, using data from 2 Phase I and 4 Phase III studies of lesinurad. Percent reduction in sUA from baseline by a XOI is predicted to be independent of GFR, FE or PUA. Uricosurics are more effective in underexcreters of UA or patients with normal GFR. Co-administration of a XOI and an uricosuric agent should be considered for patients with high sUA first in the treatment algorithm of gout before uptitration of XOI. The XOI dose in combination with a uricosuric can be reduced compared to XOI alone for the same target sUA to the degree dependent on patient's GFR and FE. This exposure-response model of UA can be used to rationally select the best drug treatment option to lower elevated sUA in gout patients under differing pathophysiological situations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.14814/phy2.13614


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