Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Nuchal and Cord [Words]
References found : 583 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29215708
[Au] Autor:Nkwabong E; Ndoumbe Mballo J; Dohbit JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[Ti] Title:Risk factors for nuchal cord entanglement at delivery.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;141(1):108-112, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To identify nuchal cord risk factors. METHODS: The present case-control study was carried out between December 2016 and April 2017 at two hospitals in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Singletons with a nuchal cord at delivery (case group) as well as the two neonates without a nuchal cord delivered immediately after each case (control group), all in cephalic presentation, were included. Undated pregnancies were excluded. The main variables studied were maternal age, parity, pregnancy duration at delivery, cord insertion site, cord length, delivery weight, and fetal sex. RESULTS: A nuchal cord was present in 121 (6.0%) of 2015 singletons. The final analysis included 114 and 228 neonates in the case and control groups, respectively, with similar maternal age, parity, pregnancy duration, and delivery weight. Significant independent risk factors for nuchal cord formation were a cord length of 70 cm or more (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 19.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.63-42.04), a pregnancy duration of more than 42 weeks (aOR 7.43, 95% CI 1.46-37.21), marginal cord insertion (aOR 2.90, 95% CI 1.11-9.35), and a male fetus (aOR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16-7.74). CONCLUSION: Marginal cord insertion and post-term pregnancy should be added to the list of known nuchal cord risk factors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12421

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[PMID]: 29479797
[Au] Autor:Avagliano L; Massa V; Mascherpa M; Marconi AM; Bulfamante GP
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Sciences, San Paolo Hospital Medical School, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Re: Clinical interventions to reduce stillbirths in sub-Saharan Africa: a mathematical model to estimate the potential reduction of stillbirths associated with specific obstetric conditions: Nuchal cord and stillbirths: true or false myth?
[So] Source:BJOG;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1471-0528
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/1471-0528.15128

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[PMID]: 29222212
[Au] Autor:Zbeidy R; Souki FG
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.
[Ti] Title:One long umbilical cord, four nuchal cord loops and a true knot.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2017, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171209
[Lr] Last revision date:171209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29170816
[Au] Autor:Walla T; Rothschild MA; Schmolling JC; Banaschak S
[Ad] Address:Institute of Legal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Melatengürtel 60-62, 50823, Cologne, Germany. rechtsmedizin@uk-koeln.de.
[Ti] Title:Umbilical cord entanglement's frequency and its impact on the newborn.
[So] Source:Int J Legal Med;, 2017 Nov 23.
[Is] ISSN:1437-1596
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Neonaticide is a serious allegation that needs a complete chain of criminal investigations. In this context, a nuchal cord is considered to be responsible for an infant's death, but there is a clear lack of evidence. The purpose of our study is to reveal if a nuchal cord can be responsible for stillbirth, poor perinatal outcome, or neonatal death in the forensic aspect. We conducted a prospective study in collaboration with the Augustinian Sisters' Hospital in Cologne, Germany in the period from February 2014 to May 2016. Four-hundred eighty-six children were enrolled. All births were assessed regarding the occurrence of an umbilical cord entanglement, and perinatal outcome was measured by arterial blood gas analysis, Apgar after 1, 5, and 10 min after birth as well as the general vitality. The prevalence of a nuchal cord was 16.87%. Apgar decrease and acidosis were significantly associated with a nuchal cord. No adverse perinatal outcome was recorded in this constellation. There was no child death regarding the first 24 h, and no mother experienced a syncope while giving birth. We can conclude that a nuchal cord is not associated with adverse perinatal outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171124
[Lr] Last revision date:171124
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00414-017-1746-8

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[PMID]: 29101986
[Au] Autor:Glanc P; Nyberg DA; Khati NJ; Deshmukh SP; Dudiak KM; Henrichsen TL; Poder L; Shipp TD; Simpson L; Weber TM; Zelop CM; Expert Panel on Women's Imaging:
[Ad] Address:Principal Author and Specialty Chair, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Bayview Campus, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: phyllis.glanc@sunnybrook.ca.
[Ti] Title:ACR Appropriateness Criteria Multiple Gestations.
[So] Source:J Am Coll Radiol;14(11S):S476-S489, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1558-349X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Women with twin or higher-order pregnancies will typically have more ultrasound examinations than women with a singleton pregnancy. Most women will have at minimum a first trimester scan, a nuchal translucency evaluation scan, fetal anatomy scan at 18 to 22 weeks, and one or more scans in the third trimester to evaluate growth. Multiple gestations are at higher risk for preterm delivery, congenital anomalies, fetal growth restriction, placenta previa, vasa previa, and velamentous cord insertion. Chorionicity and amnionicity should be determined as early as possible when a twin pregnancy is identified to permit triage of the monochorionic group into a closer surveillance model. Screening for congenital heart disease is warranted in monochorionic twins because they have an increased rate of congenital cardiac anomalies. In addition, monochorionic twins have a higher risk of developing cardiac abnormalities in later gestation related to right ventricular outflow obstruction, in particular the subgroups with twin-twin transfusion syndrome or selective intrauterine growth restriction. Monochorionic twins have unique complications including twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, twin embolization syndrome, and acardius, or twin-reversed arterial perfusion sequence. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171105
[Lr] Last revision date:171105
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 583 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28782404
[Au] Autor:Petousis S; Margioula-Siarkou C; Mamopoulos A; Sotiriadis A; Rousso D; Athanasiadis A; Dagklis T
[Ad] Address:a 3rd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Hippokrateion Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , Greece.
[Ti] Title:Does first-trimester nuchal cord affect the blood flow in the ductus venosus? A prospective observational study.
[So] Source:J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med;:1-4, 2017 Aug 16.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4954
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Main objective of the present study was to investigate the association between the presence of nuchal cord (NC) and the measurement of the ductus venosus pulsatility index for veins (ductus venosus (DV) PIV). METHODS: This was a prospective study of 1974 singleton pregnancies that underwent first-trimester screening at 11-13 gestational weeks. Color Doppler was used to demonstrate the presence of a NC in all cases and the DV PIV was calculated routinely, as part of the standard scan. The association between the presence of a NC and the DV PIV was then examined overall and at each gestational week. RESULTS: A NC was demonstrated in 17.1% of cases. The incidence of nuchal cord was significantly higher at 13-13 weeks (24.7%, n = 119) compared to the one at 12-12 (16.5%, n = 192) and 11-11 weeks (7.9%, n = 26) (p < .001). No significant correlation was found between NC presence and DV PIV (p = .344). The DV PIV was 0.99 (± 0.15) for patients without NC versus 0.99 (± 0.15) for patients with NC (p = .34). CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between the presence of a NC at 11-13 gestational weeks and the DV PIV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14767058.2017.1365124

  7 / 583 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28752144
[Au] Autor:Uysal G; Tutus S; Cagli F; Adiguzel C
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Adana Numune Training and Research Hospital, Adana, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Is there any relationship between low PAPP-A levels and measures of umbilical vein and placental thickness during first trimester of pregnancy?
[So] Source:North Clin Istanb;4(1):60-65, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2536-4553
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Low pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) level is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate relationship between umbilical cord diameter (UCD), umbilical vein and artery diameters (UVD, UAD), placental thickness, and PAPP-A level at gestational age of between 11 and 14 weeks. METHODS: UCD, UVD, UAD, and placental thickness of 246 women were assessed during ultrasound examination at between 11 and 14 weeks of gestation, as well as measurement of nuchal translucency (NT) and crown-rump length (CRL). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to PAPP-A percentile. Group 1 comprised 23 patients who had low PAPP-A (<0.44 multiple of medians [MoM], <10 percentile) and Group 2 was made up of 223 patients with PAPP-A of >0.44 MoM, >10 percentile. Calipers used for measurement were placed inner edge to inner edge of echogenic boundaries of the vessel. Largest sections of all vessels (UV and both arteries) were evaluated. Thickest part of the placenta was used for placental thickness measurement. RESULTS: Narrow UCD (<4.5±0.6 mm) was associated with low PAPP-A level (p=0.02). There was no significant difference in UVD, UAD, or placental thickness between groups. There was no significant difference in gestational age, CRL, or NT between groups. Fetal birth weight was significantly lower in Group 1 (p=0.03). CONCLUSION: Closer attention to women with low-risk, healthy pregnancies and low PAPP-A level in first trimester screening results is recommended. They should be routinely screened for background medical risk factors and umbilical cord morphology in first trimester scan.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170730
[Lr] Last revision date:170730
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.14744/nci.2017.26121

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[PMID]: 28727976
[Au] Autor:McFadden P; Smithson S; Massaro R; Huang J; Prado GT; Shertz W
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ, USA.
[Ti] Title:Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Trisomy 13: A Case of Trisomic Rescue Supporting the Continued Need for First-Trimester Ultrasound.
[So] Source:Pediatr Dev Pathol;20(4):340-347, 2017 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1093-5266
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monozygotic twins with discordant karyotypes for trisomy 13 are rare. We report a case of a spontaneously conceived pregnancy who presented with first-trimester ultrasound finding of umbilical cord cyst and increased nuchal translucency in Twin A and no abnormalities in Twin B. Amniocentesis revealed 47,XY,+13 karyotype in Twin A and 46,XY karyotype in Twin B. Selective fetal reduction was performed for Twin A. Twin B was delivered at 32 weeks gestation with normal phenotype. Peripheral blood karyotype revealed 15% mosaicism for trisomy 13 and skin fibroblast revealed 46,XY karyotype. The surviving twin will be monitored for potential complication of uniparental disomy 13 and mosaic trisomy 13. This case reinforces the need for early ultrasound and nuchal translucency measurements, especially in twin gestations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170720
[Lr] Last revision date:170720
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/1093526616686471

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[PMID]: 28674684
[Au] Autor:Al-Qaraghouli M; Fang YMV
[Ad] Address:Department Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division Maternal-Fetal Medicine, UConn Health John Dempsey Hospital, Farmington, CT, United States.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Fetal Sex on Maternal and Obstetric Outcomes.
[So] Source:Front Pediatr;5:144, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2296-2360
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fetal sex plays an important role in modifying the course and complications related to pregnancy and may also have an impact on maternal health and well-being both during and after pregnancy. The goal of this article is to review and summarize the findings from published research on physiologic and pathologic changes that may be affected by fetal sex and the effect of these changes on the maternal and obstetrical outcomes. This will help create awareness that fetal sex is not just a random chance event but an interactive process between the mother, the placenta, and the fetus. The reported effects of male sex on the course of pregnancy and delivery include higher incidence of preterm labor in singletons and twins, failure of progression in labor, true umbilical cord knots, cord prolapse, nuchal cord, higher cesarean section rate, higher heart rate variability with increased frequency, and duration of decelerations without acidemia and increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus through the poor beta cells function. Similarly, female fetal sex has been reported to modify pregnancy and delivery outcomes including altered fetal cardiac hemodynamics, increased hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, higher vulnerability of developing type 2 DM after pregnancy possibly because of influences on increased maternal insulin resistance. Placental function is also influenced by fetal sex. Vitamin D metabolism in the placenta varies by fetal sex; and the placenta of a female fetus is more responsive to the relaxing action of magnesium sulfate. Male and female feto-placental units also vary in their responses to environmental toxin exposure. The association of fetal sex with stillbirths is controversial with many studies reporting higher risk of stillbirth in male fetuses; although some smaller and limited studies have reported more stillbirths with female fetus pregnancies. Maternal status such as BMI may in turn also affect the fetus and the placenta in a sex-specific manner. There is probably a sex-specific maternal-placental-fetal interaction that has significant biological implications of which the mechanisms may be genetic, epigenetic, or hormonal. Determination of fetal sex may therefore be an important consideration in management of pregnancy and childbirth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fped.2017.00144

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[PMID]: 28646492
[Au] Autor:Li C; Miao JK; Xu Y; Hua YY; Ma Q; Zhou LL; Liu HJ; Chen QX
[Ad] Address:Department of Neonatology, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:Prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors for perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Eur J Neurol;24(8):1006-1015, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1468-1331
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the present study was to perform a meta-analysis of published data to determine the significance of clinical factors and exposures to the risk of perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (PAIS) and provide guidance for clinical diagnosis and treatment. A comprehensive literature search of the PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases for relevant observational studies (cohort/case-control) from March 1984 to March 2016 was undertaken. Two review authors independently examined the full text records to determine which studies met the inclusion criteria and evaluated risk factors for PAIS. Risk ratios, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. A total of 11 studies were included in the analyses. Intrapartum fever >38°C, pre-eclampsia, oligohydramnios, primiparity, forceps delivery, vacuum delivery, fetal heart rate abnormalities, abnormal cardiotocography tracing, cord abnormalities, birth asphyxia, emergency caesarean section, tight nuchal cord, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, umbilical arterial pH <7.10, Apgar score at 5 min <7, resuscitation at birth, hypoglycaemia, male gender and small for gestational age were identified as risk factors for PAIS. This systemic review and meta-analysis provides a preliminary evidence-based assessment of the risk factors for PAIS. Patients with any of the risk factors identified in this analysis should be given careful consideration to ensure the prevention of PAIS. Future studies focusing on the combined effects of multiple prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors for PAIS are warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ene.13337


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