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[PMID]: 28468159
[Au] Autor:Isola G; Cicciù M; Fiorillo L; Matarese G
[Ad] Address:*Departments of Biomedical, Odontostomatological Sciences, and Morphological and Functional Images, School of Dentistry, University of Messina †Department of Human Pathology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Association Between Odontoma and Impacted Teeth.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;28(3):755-758, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Odontoma is considered to be the most common odontogenic tumor of the oral cavity. Most odontomas are asymptomatic and are discovered during routine radiographic investigations and can cause disturbances in the eruption of the teeth, most commonly delayed eruption or deflection. By a retrospective study design, demographic and clinical data regarding patients who presented odontomas from year 1995 to 2015 were obtained in order and the influence of active therapy on the dentition and on the treatment of impacted teeth was analyzed. Forty-five patients (mean age 14.2 years) with 29 complex and 16 compound odontomas were included in this retrospective study. Initial symptoms were delayed eruption of permanent teeth (n = 25), pain (n = 6), swellings (n = 4), and no symptoms (n = 10); 31 patients were discovered by incidence, all of them via panoramic radiographs. The mandible/maxilla ratio was about 2:1 (31/15). Thirty-two out of 45 odontomas were in close proximity of at least 1 tooth (n = 21 at incisive). A total of 12 teeth were extracted (complex: n = 8; compound: n = 4). Of the nonextracted teeth, 33 teeth were displaced and retained. Of those, 29 teeth were aligned through orthodontic-surgical approach and 4 teeth erupted spontaneously after surgery during the follow-up period. An early detection of odontoma is more likely an accidental radiological finding, hence the need for routine radiographic analysis should be emphasized. Early diagnosis of odontomas in primary dentition is crucial in order to prevent later complications, such as impaction or failure of eruption of teeth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bicuspid/abnormalities
Molar, Third/abnormalities
Mouth Neoplasms/etiology
Odontoma/etiology
Tooth, Impacted/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Mouth Neoplasms/diagnosis
Odontoma/diagnosis
Radiography, Panoramic
Retrospective Studies
Tooth, Impacted/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000003433

  2 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468148
[Au] Autor:Ligh CA; Swanson J; Yu JW; Samra F; Bartlett SP; Taylor JA
[Ad] Address:*Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA †Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
[Ti] Title:A Morphological Classification Scheme for the Mandibular Hypoplasia in Treacher Collins Syndrome.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;28(3):683-687, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mandibular hypoplasia is a hallmark of Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), and its severity accounts for significant functional morbidity. The purpose of this study is to develop a mandibular classification scheme. METHODS: A classification scheme was designed based on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans to assess 3 characteristic features: degree of condylar hypoplasia, mandibular plane angle (condylion-gonion-menton), and degree of retrognathia (sella-nasion-B point angle). Each category was graded from I to IV and a composite mandible classification was determined by the median value among the 3 component grades. RESULTS: Twenty patients with TCS, aged 1 month to 20 years, with at least one 3D-CT prior to mandibular surgery were studied. Overall, 33 3D-CTs were evaluated and ordered from least to most severe phenotype with 10 (30%) Grade 1 (least severe), 14 (42%) Grade 2, 7 (21%) Grade 3, and 2 (7%) Grade 4 (most severe). Seven patients had at least 2 longitudinal scans encompassing an average 5.7 (range 5-11) years of growth. Despite increasing age, mandibular classification (both components and composite) remained stable in those patients over time (P = 0.2182). CONCLUSION: The authors present a classification scheme for the TCS mandible based on degree of condylar hypoplasia, mandibular plane angle (Co-Go-Me angle), and retrognathia (SNB angle). While there is a natural progression of the mandibular morphology with age, patients followed longitudinally demonstrate consistency in their classification. Further work is needed to determine the classification scheme's validity, generalizability, and overall utility.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Malocclusion/surgery
Mandibulofacial Dysostosis/classification
Mandibulofacial Dysostosis/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Cephalometry/methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Infant
Male
Malocclusion/classification
Malocclusion/diagnosis
Mandible/abnormalities
Mandibulofacial Dysostosis/diagnosis
Retrognathia/classification
Retrognathia/diagnosis
Retrognathia/surgery
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
Tooth Abnormalities/classification
Tooth Abnormalities/diagnosis
Tooth Abnormalities/surgery
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180126
[Lr] Last revision date:180126
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000003470

  3 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29224748
[Au] Autor:Bianchi PM; Bianchi A; Digilio MC; Tucci FM; Sitzia E; De Vincentiis GC
[Ad] Address:Surgery Department, Otorhinolaryngology Unit, Bambino Gesù Paediatric Hospital, Scientific Research Institute, 00100 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: piermarco.bianchi@opbg.net.
[Ti] Title:Audiological findings in a de novo mutation of ANKRD11 gene in KBG syndrome: Report of a case and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;103:109-112, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:KBG syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, due to a mutation of ANKRD11, characterized by specific craniofacial dysmorphism, short stature and macrodontia of upper central incisors, intellectual disability and skeletal anomalies. We report a de novo mutation of ANKRD11 gene in a 7-years old girl, affected by KBG syndrome with bilateral conductive hearing loss. The aim of this article was to review the audiological findings of this syndrome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abnormalities, Multiple/diagnosis
Bone Diseases, Developmental/diagnosis
Hearing Loss, Conductive/etiology
Intellectual Disability/diagnosis
Repressor Proteins/genetics
Tooth Abnormalities/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abnormalities, Multiple/genetics
Audiometry
Bone Diseases, Developmental/complications
Bone Diseases, Developmental/genetics
Child
Facies
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability/complications
Intellectual Disability/genetics
Mutation
Phenotype
Tooth Abnormalities/complications
Tooth Abnormalities/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (ANKRD11 protein, human); 0 (Repressor Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180104
[Lr] Last revision date:180104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171212
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29157542
[Au] Autor:Masood F; Benavides E
[Ad] Address:Department Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, The University of Oklahoma, College of Dentistry, Office 286-A, 1201 North Stonewall Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, USA. Electronic address: Farah-Masood@ouhsc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Alterations in Tooth Structure and Associated Systemic Conditions.
[So] Source:Radiol Clin North Am;56(1):125-140, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8275
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A variety of factors can affect the normal development of tissues and may lead to variation in the normal compliment of teeth and development of alterations in the shape and size of teeth. These anomalies can be congenital, developmental, or acquired. Dental anomalies can present as isolated traits or be associated with systemic conditions and syndromes for which early diagnosis and genetic testing may result in better treatment outcomes and quality of life. Dentists play an essential role in the multidisciplinary management of these abnormalities. This article discusses some of these tooth alterations and associated systemic and genetic conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics
Radiography, Dental/methods
Tooth Abnormalities/diagnostic imaging
Tooth Abnormalities/genetics
Tooth/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171122
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27777193
[Au] Autor:Hu XY; Yao YF; Cui BM; Lv J; Shen X; Ren B; Li MY; Guo Q; Huang RJ; Li Y
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. E-mail: drhuxiaoyu@163.com.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of causes and whole microbial structure in a case of rampant caries].
[So] Source:Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao;36(10):1328-1333, 2016 Oct 20.
[Is] ISSN:1673-4254
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To analyze the whole microbial structure in a case of rampant caries to provide evidence for its prevention and treatment. METHODS: Clinical samples including blood, supragingival plaque, plaque in the caries cavity, saliva, and mucosal swabs were collected with the patient's consent. The blood sample was sent for routine immune test, and the others samples were stained using Gram method and cultured for identifying colonies and 16S rRNA sequencing. DNA was extracted from the samples and tested for the main cariogenic bacterium (Streptococcus mutans) with qPCR, and the whole microbial structure was analyzed using DGGE. RESULTS: The patient had a high levels of IgE and segmented neutrophils in his blood. Streptococci with extremely long chains were found in the saliva samples under microscope. Culture of the samples revealed the highest bacterial concentration in the saliva. The relative content of hemolytic bacterium was detected in the samples, the highest in the caries cavity; C. albicans was the highest in the dental plaque. In addition, 33 bacterial colonies were identified by VITEK system and 16S rDNA sequence phylogenetic analysis, and among them streptococci and Leptotrichia wade were enriched in the dental plaque sample, Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus tigurinus in the caries cavity, and Lactobacillus in the saliva. S. mutans was significantly abundant in the mucosal swabs, saliva and plaque samples of the caries cavity as shown by qPCR. Compared to samples collected from a healthy individual and another two patients with rampant caries, the samples from this case showed a decreased bacterial diversity and increased bacterial abundance shown by PCR-DGGE profiling, and multiple Leptotrichia sp. were detected by gel sequencing. CONCLUSION: The outgrowth of such pathogenic microorganisms as S. mutans and Leptotrichia sp., and dysbiosis of oral microbial community might contribute to the pathogenesis of rampant caries in this case.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dental Caries/microbiology
Microbiota
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abnormalities, Multiple
Dental Plaque/microbiology
Fusobacterium/isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin E/blood
Lactobacillus/isolation & purification
Leptotrichia/isolation & purification
Limb Deformities, Congenital
Mouth Mucosa/microbiology
Neutrophils/cytology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
Saliva/microbiology
Streptococcus/isolation & purification
Tooth Abnormalities
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S); 37341-29-0 (Immunoglobulin E)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29161180
[Au] Autor:Kunche A; Kiresur MA; Ananthaneni A; Guduru VS; Puneeth HK; Bagalad B
[Ad] Address:a Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology , St. Joseph Dental College , Eluru , Andhra Pradesh , India.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of verdeluz orange G and modified Gallego stains.
[So] Source:Biotech Histochem;:1-5, 2017 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:1473-7760
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tumors of the oral cavity include combinations of hard and soft tissues that may be difficult to identify using routine hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) staining. Although combination stains can demonstrate hard and soft tissues, trichrome stains, such as VanGieson and Masson, cannot differentiate dental hard tissues, such as dentin, cementum and osteoid. Modified Gallegos (MGS) and verdeluz orange G-acid fuchsin (VOF) stains can differentiate components of teeth. We used 10 tissue sections of decalcified bone and 10 pathologic tissue sections that contained different calcified tissues including peripheral ossifying fibroma, odontoma, central ossifying fibroma and cemento-ossifying fibroma. Sections were stained with H & E, VOF or MGS. H and E stained both hard tissues pink. VOF stained bone purple-red, cementum red and collagen blue. MGS stained bone green-blue, cementum red and collagen blue. VOF staining intensity and differentiation was better than MGS staining. VOF staining demonstrated hard tissue components distinctly and exhibited good contrast with the surrounding connective tissue. VOF also is a simple, single step, rapid staining procedure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/10520295.2017.1341058

  7 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29114426
[Au] Autor:Gurler G; Delilbasi C; Delilbasi E
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul Medipol University Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Investigation of impacted supernumerary teeth: a cone beam computed tomograph (cbct) study.
[So] Source:J Istanb Univ Fac Dent;51(3):18-24, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2149-2352
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacted supernumerary teeth which were initially detected on panoramic radiographs by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, supernumerary teeth diagnosed on panoramic radiographs taken from patients who had admitted for routine dental treatment were evaluated using CBCT. Patients' age, gender, systemic conditions as well as number of supernumerary teeth, unilateral-bilateral presence, anatomical localization (maxilla, mandible, anterior-premolar-molar, mesiodens-lateral-canine, parapremolar-paramolar-distomolar) shape (rudimentary, supplemental, tuberculate, odontoma), position (palatal-lingual-buccal-labial-central), shortest distance between the tooth and adjacent cortical plate, complications and treatment were assessed. Results: A total of 47 impacted supernumerary teeth in 34 patients were investigated in this study. Of these, 33 (70.2%) were unilateral and 14 (29.8%) were bilateral. Only 1 supernumerary tooth was found in 27 patients (79.4%) whereas 7 patients (20.6%) had 2 or more supernumerary teeth. Most of the teeth located in the anterior region (74.4%) of the jaws and maxilla (74.4%). Twenty teeth (42.5%) were mesiodens, 11 (23.4%) were lateral or canine, 14 (29.7%) were parapremolar and 2(4.4%) were distomolar. Twenty-seven teeth (57.4%) were rudimentary, 15 (31.9%) were supplemental and 5 (10.7%) were odontoma in shape. The shortest distance between the supernumerary tooth and adjacent cortical plate varied between 0 to 2.5 mm with a mean of 0.66 mm. The most common clinical complaint was the non-eruption of permanent teeth (42.5%). All supernumerary teeth were removed under local anesthesia. Orthodontic traction was performed for those impacted permanent teeth if necessary. Conclusion: Impacted supernumerary teeth are usually in close proximity to cortical bone. Although this may facilitate surgical access, there is a risk of damaging surrounding anatomical structures. Therefore, CBCT evaluation of impacted supernumerary teeth for accurate planning is recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17096/jiufd.20098

  8 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29099370
[Au] Autor:Melo Filho MR; Pêgo SPB; Cardoso CM; Rocha BA; Martelli-Júnior H; Flores IL; Dos Santos LAN; Paranaiba LMR
[Ti] Title:Metachronous ameloblastic fibro-odontoma and dentigerous cyst in the posterior mandible.
[So] Source:Gen Dent;65(6):69-72, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0363-6771
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO) is a rare mixed odontogenic tumor with histologic features of an ameloblastic fibroma in conjunction with the presence of dentin and enamel. It usually appears as a well-circumscribed radiolucency with radiopaque foci and slow growth and is commonly seen in children and young adults. A 13-year-old boy presented with an asymptomatic swelling in the posterior right region of the mandible and the right ascending ramus. The clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings confirmed the diagnosis of an AFO. After 8 months, a radiolucent lesion involving the unerupted mandibular left third molar was observed; a final diagnosis of a dentigerous cyst (DC) was established for this lesion. Although coincidental events, metachronous odontogenic lesions suggest a possible common genetic origin, since both can be caused by related cellular signaling pathways. Complete enucleation is recommended for both AFOs and DCs; rates of recurrence are low.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29087801
[Au] Autor:Lee DW; Kim JG; Yang YM
[Ti] Title:Decompression for Unerupted Primary Mandibular Second Molars Associated with Physical Barriers: Case Reports.
[So] Source:J Clin Pediatr Dent;, 2017 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:1053-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Primary impaction of primary teeth might be due to genetic predisposition or physical disturbance including odontoma, supernumerary tooth, and crowded tooth. Among them, calcific deposit or odontoma is commonly associated with primary dentition. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent complications. However, results of treatment may vary depending on the condition of unerupted tooth. Here we report two clinical cases of unerupted primary mandibular second molars with physical barriers such as compound odontoma and calcific deposit focusing on diagnostic means and the importance of early treatment of these lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.17796/1053-4628-42.2.12

  10 / 5971 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29034280
[Au] Autor:Mashhadiabba F; Shamloo N; Jafari M; Vafadar S
[Ad] Address:Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Ameloblastic Fibro-Odontoma in a 7-Month-Old Infant: A Case Report.
[So] Source:J Dent (Shiraz);18(3):234-236, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2345-6485
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma is a relatively rare, benign odontogenic tumor that usually occurs in children and adolescents with unerupted teeth. This article reports an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma in the anterior mandible as a "bump on her gum" in a 7-month-old girl. This is the first case under 9 months old reported to date. Radiographic and histologic findings as well as the treatment are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE


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