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[PMID]: 28030349
[Au] Autor:Li K; Lan Y; Luo H; Shahzad M; Zhang H; Wang L; Zhang L; Liu D; Liu X; Hao Y; Sizhu S; Li J
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of three Oesophagostomum spp. from Tibetan Pigs analyzed by Genetic Markers of nad1, cox3 and ITS1.
[So] Source:Acta Parasitol;62(1):90-96, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1896-1851
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Parasitic nematodes of Oesophagostomum spp., commonly known as 'nodular worms' are one of the most widely distributed and prevalent emerging zoonotic nematodes. However, little is known about the prevalence and gene characteristics of those parasites in Tibetan pigs. Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the prevalence, isolation and identification of Oesophagostomum spp from Tibetan pigs by genetic markers of nad1,cox3 and ITS1 for the first time. The results revealed that the infection rate of O. dentatum and O. quadrispinulatum by genetic markers of nad1 was 81.13%; 35 (66.04%); the O. dentatum and O. quadrispinulatum by genetic markers cox3 was 66.04%, and O. dentatum and O. stephanostomum by genetic markers ITS1 was found to be 77.36%. Interestingly, the O. stephanostomum specie was identified and isolated from 90.48% stomach and 69.23% colon samples by genetic markers of ITS1. The present study, for the first time has described the presence and genetic characterization of Oesophagostomun spp of O. dentatum, O. quadrispinulatum and especially O. stephanostomum in Tibetan pigs from the high and remote Tibetan plateau. A public concern should be raised in terms of economical losses and severe public health problem.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Electron Transport Complex IV/metabolism
Helminth Proteins/metabolism
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/classification
Swine Diseases/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
DNA, Intergenic/genetics
Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic/physiology
Genetic Markers
Helminth Proteins/genetics
NADH Dehydrogenase/genetics
NADH Dehydrogenase/metabolism
Oesophagostomiasis/epidemiology
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Protein Subunits
Swine
Swine Diseases/epidemiology
Tibet/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Intergenic); 0 (Genetic Markers); 0 (Helminth Proteins); 0 (Protein Subunits); EC 1.6.99.3 (NADH Dehydrogenase); EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170517
[Lr] Last revision date:170517
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161229
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27751954
[Au] Autor:Jiménez-Castells C; Vanbeselaere J; Kohlhuber S; Ruttkowski B; Joachim A; Paschinger K
[Ad] Address:Department für Chemie, Universität für Bodenkultur, 1190 Wien, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Gender and developmental specific N-glycomes of the porcine parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1861(2):418-430, 2017 02.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The porcine nodule worm Oesophagostomum dentatum is a strongylid class V nematode rather closely related to the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, in contrast to the non-parasitic C. elegans, the parasitic O. dentatum is an obligate sexual organism, which makes both a gender and developmental glycomic comparison possible. METHODS: Different enzymatic and chemical methods were used to release N-glycans from male and female O. dentatum as well as from L3 and L4 larvae. Glycans were analysed by MALDI-TOF MS after either 2D-HPLC (normal then reversed phase) or fused core RP-HPLC. RESULTS: Whereas the L3 N-glycome was simpler and more dominated by phosphorylcholine-modified structures, the male and female worms express a wide range of core fucosylated N-glycans with up to three fucose residues. Seemingly, simple methylated paucimannosidic structures can be considered 'male', while methylation of fucosylated glycans was more pronounced in females. On the other hand, while many of the fucosylated paucimannosidic glycans are identical with examples from other nematode species, but simpler than the tetrafucosylated glycans of C. elegans, there is a wide range of phosphorylcholine-modified glycans with extended HexNAc PC motifs not observed in our previous studies on other nematodes. CONCLUSION: The interspecies tendency of class V nematodes to share most, but not all, N-glycans applies also to O. dentatum; furthermore, we establish, for the first time in a parasitic nematode, that glycomes vary upon development and sexual differentiation. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Unusual methylated, core fucosylated and phosphorylcholine-containing N-glycans vary between stages and genders in a parasitic nematode.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Oesophagostomum/metabolism
Parasites/metabolism
Polysaccharides/chemistry
Polysaccharides/metabolism
Swine/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods
Female
Fucose/chemistry
Fucose/metabolism
Glycomics/methods
Glycosylation
Larva/metabolism
Male
Mass Spectrometry/methods
Methylation
Nematoda/metabolism
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Phosphorylcholine/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Polysaccharides); 107-73-3 (Phosphorylcholine); 28RYY2IV3F (Fucose)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161022
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27309976
[Au] Autor:Terio KA; Lonsdorf EV; Kinsel MJ; Raphael J; Lipende I; Collins A; Li Y; Hahn BH; Travis DA; Gillespie TR
[Ad] Address:Zoological Pathology Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Brookfield, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Oesophagostomiasis in non-human primates of Gombe National Park, Tanzania.
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;, 2016 Jun 16.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oesophagostomum sp. is a parasitic nematode that frequently infects wild chimpanzees. Although nodular lesions are commonly associated with infection, some wild chimpanzee populations seem to tolerate Oesophagostomum nodular lesions while those at Gombe and other sites suffer from associated morbidity and mortality. From August 2004 to December 2013, we examined demographic (i.e., age, sex) and individual correlates (i.e., fecal consistency, Oesophagostomum egg production) to Oesophagostomum-associated pathology in 14 individually recognized chimpanzees at Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania. In addition, we characterized Oesophagostomum-associated pathology in 14 individual sympatric primates including baboons, colobus, and cercopithecid monkeys. In five chimpanzees, there was no evidence of any significant underlying disease aside from oesophagostomiasis to explain the thin condition or diarrhea. All five of these chimpanzees had moderate to numerous parasitic nodules. In general, nodules were more numerous in older chimpanzees. Three of four chimpanzees with the highest average Oesophagostomum egg counts in feces collected during the year prior to their death had numerous parasitic nodules at necropsy. In contrast, the four chimpanzees with the lowest egg counts had only moderate numbers of nodules. No association (P = 0.74) was noted between frequency of diarrhea in the year prior to death and the number of nodules noted at necropsy. Nodules were also present in all baboons examined documenting pathology associated with Oesophagostomum infection in wild baboons. In contrast, no lesions were noted in colobus or cercopithecid monkeys, although it is uncertain if they are infected as no fecal studies have been completed in these species to date at Gombe. Sequence of DNA isolated from nodules in chimpanzees matched (99%) Oesophagostomum stephanostomum. Further research is needed to identify the types of Oesophagostomum causing lesions in baboons and to determine if baboons suffer from these infections. Am. J. Primatol. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22572

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[PMID]: 26374536
[Au] Autor:Zanzani SA; Gazzonis AL; Epis S; Manfredi MT
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Science and Public Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 10, 20133, Milan, Italy. sergio.zanzani@unimi.it.
[Ti] Title:Study of the gastrointestinal parasitic fauna of captive non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis).
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;115(1):307-12, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to examine helminths and protozoans in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) imported from registered breeding facilities in China and their relation to health risks for non-human primate handlers in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities. Fresh fecal samples were collected from a total of 443 M. fascicularis and analyzed by copromicroscopical analysis, immunoenzymatic, or molecular assays. As to helminths, whose eggs were shed in 2.03% of the samples, Trichuris and Oesophagostomum were the only two taxa found, with low prevalence and low eggs per gram (EPG) values. Protozoans were more frequently detected (87.40%), with Entamoeba coli (85.19%) and Endolimax nana (79.26%) as the most prevalent species shed. Other parasites found by fecal smear examination were uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoebas (78.52%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (42.96%), and Chilomastix mesnili (24.44%), while cysts of Balantidium coli (22.2%) were only observed by sedimentation. No coproantigens of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica complex were detected. Blastocystis sp. infection was noticed in 87.63% of macaques by PCR. These cynomolgus monkeys were infected with many subtypes (ST1, ST2, ST3, ST5, and ST7), where the predominant Blastocystis sp. subtypes were ST2 (77.5%), followed by ST1 (63.5%). Data collected confirmed the presence of potentially zoonotic parasites and a high parasite diversity, suggesting the need for appropriate and sensitive techniques to adequately control them and related health risks for handlers of non-human primates in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Helminthiasis, Animal/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
Macaca fascicularis/parasitology
Monkey Diseases/parasitology
Protozoan Infections, Animal/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amebiasis/epidemiology
Amebiasis/parasitology
Amebiasis/veterinary
Animals
Blastocystis/classification
Blastocystis/genetics
Blastocystis/isolation & purification
Blastocystis Infections/epidemiology
Blastocystis Infections/parasitology
Blastocystis Infections/veterinary
China/epidemiology
Endolimax/isolation & purification
Entamoeba/classification
Entamoebiasis/epidemiology
Entamoebiasis/parasitology
Entamoebiasis/veterinary
Feces/parasitology
Genotyping Techniques
Helminthiasis, Animal/epidemiology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/isolation & purification
Prevalence
Protozoan Infections, Animal/epidemiology
Trichuriasis/parasitology
Trichuriasis/veterinary
Trichuris/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 171007
[Lr] Last revision date:171007
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150917
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-015-4748-9

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[PMID]: 26213101
[Au] Autor:Phuphisut O; Maipanich W; Pubampen S; Yindee M; Kosoltanapiwat N; Nuamtanong S; Ponlawat A; Adisakwattana P
[Ad] Address:Department of Helminthology,Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi,Bangkok10400,Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Molecular identification of the strongyloid nematode Oesophagostomum aculeatum in the Asian wild elephant Elephas maximus.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;90(4):434-40, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The transmission of zoonoses by wildlife, including elephants, is a growing global concern. In this study, we screened for helminth infections among Asian wild elephants (Elephas maximus) of the Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary, Kanchanaburi, Thailand. Elephant faecal samples (45) were collected from the sanctuary grounds during January through November 2013 and assayed individually using the tetranucleotide microsatellite technique. Microscopic examination indicated a high prevalence of strongylids (93.0%) and low prevalences of trichurids (2.3%) and ascarids (2.3%). To identify the strongylid species, small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences were amplified from copro-DNA and compared with sequences in GenBank. The generated SSU-rDNA sequences comprised five distinct haplotypes that were closely related to Oesophagostomum aculeatum. A phylogenetic analysis that incorporated related nematodes yielded a tree separated into two main clades, one containing our samples and human and domestic animal hookworms and the other consisting of Strongyloides. The present results indicate that O. aculeatum in local elephants is a potential source of helminthiasis in human and domestic animals in this wild-elephant irrupted area.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Elephants/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/classification
Oesophagostomum/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cluster Analysis
DNA, Helminth/chemistry
DNA, Helminth/genetics
DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry
DNA, Ribosomal/genetics
Feces/parasitology
Haplotypes
Microsatellite Repeats
Microscopy
Oesophagostomiasis/epidemiology
Oesophagostomiasis/pathology
Oesophagostomum/genetics
Phylogeny
Prevalence
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Thailand
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 18S)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170227
[Lr] Last revision date:170227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X15000541

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[PMID]: 25226270
[Au] Autor:Li F; Hu T; Duan NC; Li WY; Teng Q; Li H; Liu W; Liu Y; Cheng TY
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University,Changsha,Hunan Province,410128,PR China.
[Ti] Title:Sequence variation in two mitochondrial DNA regions and internal transcribed spacer among isolates of the nematode Oesophagostomum asperum originating from goats in Hunan Province, China.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;90(1):1-6, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study examined sequence variability in two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) among Oesophagostomum asperum isolates from goats in Hunan Province, China. A portion of the cox1 (pcox1), nad1 (pnad1) genes and the ITS (ITS1+5.8S rDNA+ITS2) rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) separately from adult O. asperum individuals and the representative amplicons were subjected to sequencing from both directions. The lengths of pcox1, pnad1 and ITS rDNA were 366 bp, 681 bp and 785 bp, respectively. The A+T contents of gene sequences were 71.5-72% for pcox1, 73.7-74.2% for pnad1 and 58-58.8% for ITS rDNA. Intra-specific sequence variations within O. asperum were 0-1.6% for pcox1, 0-1.9% for pnad1 and 0-1.7% for ITS rDNA, while inter-specific sequence differences among members of the genus Oesophagostomum were significantly higher, being 11.1-12.5%, 13.3-17.7% and 8.5-18.6% for pcox1, pnad1 and ITS rDNA, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses using combined sequences of pcox1 and pnad1, with three different computational algorithms (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony), revealed distinct groups with high statistical support. These findings demonstrated the existence of intra-specific variation in mtDNA and rDNA sequences among O. asperum isolates from goats in Hunan Province, China, and have implications for studying molecular epidemiology and population genetics of O. asperum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: DNA, Helminth/genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial/genetics
Genetic Variation
Goat Diseases/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Base Sequence
China
Female
Goats
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomum/classification
Oesophagostomum/isolation & purification
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth); 0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140917
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X14000650

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[PMID]: 26451592
[Au] Autor:Cibot M; Guillot J; Lafosse S; Bon C; Seguya A; Krief S
[Ad] Address:UMR 7206, Eco-Anthropologie et Ethnobiologie, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, France; UMR 7179, Mécanismes adaptatifs: Des organismes aux communautés, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, France; Great Apes Conservation Project (GACP), Sebitoli Research Station, Kibale National
[Ti] Title:Nodular Worm Infections in Wild Non-human Primates and Humans Living in the Sebitoli Area (Kibale National Park, Uganda): Do High Spatial Proximity Favor Zoonotic Transmission?
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;9(10):e0004133, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Nodular Oesophagostomum genus nematodes are a major public health concern in some African regions because they can be lethal to humans. Their relatively high prevalence in people has been described in Uganda recently. While non-human primates also harbor Oesophagostomum spp., the epidemiology of this oesophagostomosis and the role of these animals as reservoirs of the infection in Eastern Africa are not yet well documented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study aimed to investigate Oesophagostomum infection in terms of parasite species diversity, prevalence and load in three non-human primates (Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis, Colobus guereza) and humans living in close proximity in a forested area of Sebitoli, Kibale National Park (KNP), Uganda. The molecular phylogenetic analyses provided the first evidence that humans living in the Sebitoli area harbored O. stephanostomum, a common species in free-ranging chimpanzees. Chimpanzees were also infected by O. bifurcum, a common species described in human populations throughout Africa. The recently described Oesophagostomum sp. found in colobine monkeys and humans and which was absent from baboons in the neighboring site of Kanyawara in KNP (10 km from Sebitoli), was only found in baboons. Microscopic analyses revealed that the infection prevalence and parasite load in chimpanzees were significantly lower in Kanyawara than in Sebitoli, an area more impacted by human activities at its borders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Three different Oesophagostomum species circulate in humans and non-human primates in the Sebitoli area and our results confirm the presence of a new genotype of Oesophagostomum recently described in Uganda. The high spatiotemporal overlap between humans and chimpanzees in the studied area coupled with the high infection prevalence among chimpanzees represent factors that could increase the risk of transmission for O. stephanostomum between the two primate species. Finally, the importance of local-scale research for zoonosis risk management is important because environmental disturbance and species contact can differ, leading to different parasitological profiles between sites that are close together within the same forest patches.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/isolation & purification
Primate Diseases/epidemiology
Primate Diseases/parasitology
Zoonoses/epidemiology
Zoonoses/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Colobus/parasitology
DNA, Helminth/chemistry
DNA, Helminth/genetics
Disease Reservoirs
Female
Genetic Variation
Humans
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Oesophagostomiasis/epidemiology
Oesophagostomiasis/transmission
Oesophagostomum/classification
Oesophagostomum/genetics
Pan troglodytes/parasitology
Papio anubis/parasitology
Parasite Load
Parks, Recreational
Primate Diseases/transmission
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Topography, Medical
Uganda/epidemiology
Zoonoses/transmission
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151010
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004133

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[PMID]: 26026709
[Au] Autor:Tyagi R; Joachim A; Ruttkowski B; Rosa BA; Martin JC; Hallsworth-Pepin K; Zhang X; Ozersky P; Wilson RK; Ranganathan S; Sternberg PW; Gasser RB; Mitreva M
[Ad] Address:The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
[Ti] Title:Cracking the nodule worm code advances knowledge of parasite biology and biotechnology to tackle major diseases of livestock.
[So] Source:Biotechnol Adv;33(6 Pt 1):980-91, 2015 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1899
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic pathogens have a devastating, long-term impact on animal health and welfare. Hundreds of millions of animals are affected by parasitic nematodes of the order Strongylida. Unlocking the molecular biology of representatives of this order, and understanding nematode-host interactions, drug resistance and disease using advanced technologies could lead to entirely new ways of controlling the diseases that they cause. Oesophagostomum dentatum (nodule worm; superfamily Strongyloidea) is an economically important strongylid nematode parasite of swine worldwide. The present article reports recent advances made in biology and animal biotechnology through the draft genome and developmental transcriptome of O. dentatum, in order to support biological research of this and related parasitic nematodes as well as the search for new and improved interventions. This first genome of any member of the Strongyloidea is 443 Mb in size and predicted to encode 25,291 protein-coding genes. Here, we review the dynamics of transcription throughout the life cycle of O. dentatum, describe double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) machinery and infer molecules involved in development and reproduction, and in inducing or modulating immune responses or disease. The secretome predicted for O. dentatum is particularly rich in peptidases linked to interactions with host tissues and/or feeding activity, and a diverse array of molecules likely involved in immune responses. This research progress provides an important resource for future comparative genomic and molecular biological investigations as well as for biotechnological research toward new anthelmintics, vaccines and diagnostic tests.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biotechnology
Genomics
Oesophagostomiasis
Oesophagostomum
Swine Diseases/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
DNA, Helminth/analysis
DNA, Helminth/genetics
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomiasis/veterinary
Oesophagostomum/genetics
Oesophagostomum/metabolism
Swine
Transcriptome/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150601
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 402 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25956635
[Au] Autor:Jankowska-Makosa A; Knecht D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pig Breeding, Institute of Animal Breeding, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chelmonskiego 38 C, Wroclaw 51 630, Poland. Electronic address: anna.jankowska-makosa@up.wroc.pl.
[Ti] Title:The influence of endoparasites on selected production parameters in pigs in various housing systems.
[So] Source:Res Vet Sci;100:153-60, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2661
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the study was to determine the level of lean meat content and daily gains of 400 fatteners infected by endoparasites and kept in two systems (shallow and deep litter). Slaughter evaluation of the pigs was conducted according to the EUROP carcass classification. In order to evaluate the average daily gains (g) during finishing period, body weights were investigated twice: at the beginning and at the end of the finishing period. The housing system affected the presence of Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum spp. Infestation was found to be higher on shallow than on deep litter, and it significantly affected selected fattening and slaughter parameters of the fatteners. Infected animals were characterized by gains approximately 60 g lower than those of uninfected ones, while meatiness was higher in fatteners which were not infected at the end of the fattening period compared to animals with parasites (55.2% vs. 52.0%).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ascariasis/parasitology
Ascaris suum/physiology
Housing, Animal
Meat/analysis
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomum/physiology
Swine Diseases/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Body Weight
Female
Floors and Floorcoverings
Male
Swine/growth & development
Swine/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 150606
[Lr] Last revision date:150606
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150510
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 402 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25576439
[Au] Autor:Andreasen A; Petersen HH; Kringel H; Iburg TM; Skovgaard K; Dawson H; Urban JF; Thamsborg SM
[Ad] Address:Parasitology and Aquatic Diseases, Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlægevej 100, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. Electronic address: malte@sund.ku.dk.
[Ti] Title:Immune and inflammatory responses in pigs infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum.
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;207(3-4):249-58, 2015 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the present study was to investigate parasite induced immune responses in pigs co-infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum as compared to mono-species infected pigs. T. suis is known to elicit a strong immune response leading to rapid expulsion, and a strong antagonistic effect on O. dentatum populations has been observed in co-infected pigs. Forty-eight helminth naïve pigs were allocated into 4 groups in a 2-factorial design. Two groups were trickle inoculated with either 10 T. suis eggs/kg/day (Group T) or 20 O. dentatum L3/kg/day (Group O). Group OT was infected with same levels of both T. suis and O. dentatum (Group OT) and Group C remained uninfected. In each group, six pigs were necropsied after 35 days and the remaining pigs after 71 days. Parasite E/S-antigen specific serum antibodies were quantified by an in-direct ELISA. qPCR was used to measure the expression of immune function related genes in the mucosa of proximal colon and the draining lymph node. Highly significant interactions were identified for O. dentatum specific IgG1 (p<0.0001) and IgG2 (p<0.0006) antibodies with a remarkable 2-fold higher antibody response in group OT pigs as compared to group O. These findings indicated that T. suis enhanced the antibody response against O. dentatum in Group OT. The gene expression data confirmed a strong Type 2 response to T. suis (e.g. marked increase in IL-13, ARG1 and CCL11) and clearly weaker in amplitude and/or delayed onset response to O. dentatum in the single infected group. Interactions were found between the two nematodes with regard to several cytokines, e.g. the increase in IL-13 observed in Group T was absent in Group OT (p=0.06, proximal colon mucosa, 35 and 71 p.i.). Some of these immune response-related interactions may support, or even partially explain, the observed interactions between the two worm populations in co-infected pigs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coinfection
Oesophagostomiasis/immunology
Swine Diseases/immunology
Trichuriasis/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antibodies, Helminth/blood
Cytokines/genetics
Gene Expression Regulation/immunology
Oesophagostomiasis/parasitology
Oesophagostomum/immunology
Swine
Swine Diseases/parasitology
Trichuriasis/parasitology
Trichuris/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Helminth); 0 (Cytokines)
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 150119
[Lr] Last revision date:150119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150111
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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