Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Onchocerciasis [Words]
References found : 4159 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29504723
[Au] Autor:Woolnough EL; Chmiel ER; Currie BJ
[Ad] Address:Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia
[Ti] Title:Treating Onchocerciasis in Regions in Which Loa loa Is Endemic.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;378(9):871, 2018 03 01.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1716788

  2 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29490177
[Au] Autor:Pion SD; Boussinesq M; Kamgno J
[Ad] Address:Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France
[Ti] Title:Treating Onchocerciasis in Regions in Which Loa loa Is Endemic.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;378(9):871-872, 2018 03 01.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1716788

  3 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505580
[Au] Autor:Mahdy MAK; Abdul-Ghani R; Abdulrahman TAA; Al-Eryani SMA; Al-Mekhlafi AM; Alhaidari SAA; Azazy AA
[Ad] Address:Tropical Disease Research Center, University of Science and Technology, Sana'a, Yemen.
[Ti] Title:Onchocerca volvulus infection in Tihama region - West of Yemen: Continuing transmission in ivermectin-targeted endemic foci and unveiled endemicity in districts with previously unknown status.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006329, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Onchocerciasis in Yemen is one of the most neglected diseases, where baseline estimates of onchocerciasis and monitoring of the impact of ivermectin regularly administered to the affected individuals on its transmission are lacking. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the anti-Ov16 IgG4 seroprevalence among local communities of Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates of Tihama Region. The factors possibly associated with previous exposure to infection were also studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in two ivermectin-targeted districts endemic for onchocerciasis in Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit and two untargeted districts with unknown previous endemicity in Hodeidah between February and July 2017. For 508 residents sampled by a multi-stage random approach, data were collected and blood specimens were screened for anti-Ov16 IgG4 using the SD BIOLINE Onchocerciasis IgG4 rapid tests. The study revealed an overall anti-Ov16 IgG4 rate of 18.5% (94/508) in all surveyed districts, with 10.2% (12/118) of children aged ≤10 years being seropositive. Moreover, rates of 8.0% (4/50) and 6.1% (4/66) were found in districts not officially listed as endemic for the disease. Multivariable analysis confirmed the age of more than ten years and residing within a large family as the independent predictors of exposure to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Onchocerciasis transmission is still ongoing as supported by the higher anti-Ov16 IgG4 seroprevalence rate among children aged ≤10 years compared to that (<0.1%) previously set by the World Health Organization as a serologic criterion for transmission interruption. Further large-scale studies combining serologic and entomologic criteria are recommended for the mapping of O. volvulus in human and blackfly populations in endemic foci and their neighboring areas of uncertain endemicity. In addition, ivermectin distribution, coverage and impact on disease transmission need to be continually assessed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006329

  4 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497506
[Au] Autor:Mischlinger J; Veletzky L; Tazemda-Kuitsouc GB; Pitzinger P; Matsegui PB; Gmeiner M; Lagler H; Gebru T; Held J; Mordmüller B; Ramharter M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine I, Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Behavioural and clinical predictors for Loiasis.
[So] Source:J Glob Health;8(1):010413, 2018 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2047-2986
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Loiasis is a vector-borne disease in Central and West Africa. While there is still uncertainty to what extent loiasis is responsible for population morbidity, individuals having both loiasis and onchocerciasis have a high risk of fatal encephalopathy when treatment (ie, ivermectin) for onchocerciasis is given. Therefore it is current policy that communities of high loiasis-burden are excluded from mass drug administration programmes of ivermectin. To address this treatment gap we present diagnostic scores, based on clinical and behavioural predictors that may help to rapidly identify sub-groups with loiasis within high-burden communities. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed in the province of la Ngounie, Gabon between December 2015 and Februrary 2016 and 947 participants of all ages were recruited. Clinical parameters and behavioural exposure factors were ascertained by questionnaire-based interviews. Parasitological analysis of blood samples was performed for detection. Diagnostic scores consisting of clinical and behavioural factors were modelled to predict loiasis in sub-groups residing in endemic regions. Results: Increasing sylvan exposure was identified as important risk factor for loiasis with adjusted odds ratios of 5.1 (95% confidence interval CI 2.6-9.9) for occasional forest exposure, 11.1 (95% CI 5.4-22.6) for frequent forest exposure and 25.7 (95% CI 12.5-52.9) for intensive forest exposure. Individuals with loiasis were 7.7 (95% CI 5.4-11.0) times more likely to report recurrent pruritus than those without loiasis. Reporting of regular daily exposure to the deep rain forest and recurrent pruritus was 9-fold (positive likelihood ratio 9.18; 95% CI: 6.39-13.18) more prevalent in individuals with loiasis than in controls. Concordantly, the absence of regular weekly forest exposure was associated with extremely low disease-likelihood (negative likelihood ratio 0.09; 95% CI 0.05-0.16). Conclusions: These composite scores may serve as a simple tool to rapidly identify both those most and those least at risk of disease and may simplify loiasis control activities as well as screening procedures for studies on loiasis. Further, they may aid policy-makers to tailor the delivery of ivermectin mass drug administration for onchocerciasis control programmes more effectively and safely in regions of high loiasis-burden.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.7189/jogh.08.010413

  5 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494606
[Au] Autor:Komlan K; Vossberg PS; Gantin RG; Solim T; Korbmacher F; Banla M; Padjoudoum K; Karabou P; Köhler C; Soboslay PT
[Ad] Address:Onchocerciasis Reference Laboratory, National Institute of Hygiene, Sokodé, Togo.
[Ti] Title:Onchocerca volvulus infection and serological prevalence, ocular onchocerciasis and parasite transmission in northern and central Togo after decades of Simulium damnosum s.l. vector control and mass drug administration of ivermectin.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006312, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin has become the main intervention to control onchocerciasis or "river blindness". In Togo, after many years of MDA, Onchocerca volvulus infection has declined dramatically, and elimination appears achievable, but in certain river basins the current situation remains unknown. We have conducted parasitological, serological, ophthalmological, and entomological assessments in northern and central Togo within the river basins of Ôti, Kéran and Mô. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Examinations were completed in 1,455 participants from 11 onchocerciasis sentinel villages, and O. volvulus transmission by Simulium damnosum sensu lato (s.l.) was evaluated. In children (aged 1-10 years), the prevalence of microfilariae (Mf) was 2.3% and in adults it ranged from 5.1 to 13.3%. Positive IgG4 responses to O. volvulus adult (crude) worm antigen (OvAg) and the recombinant Ov16 antigen were in all-ages 48.7% and 34.4%, and 29.1% and 14.9% in children, respectively. In the river basin villages of Kéran, Mô and Ôti, the IgG4 seroprevalences to OvAg in children were 51.7%, 23.5% and 12.7%, respectively, and to the Ov16 antigen 33.3% (Kéran) and 5.2% (Ôti). Onchocerciasis ocular lesions (punctate keratitis, evolving iridocyclitis and chorioretinitis) were observed in children and young adults. O. volvulus-specific DNA (Ov150) was detected by poolscreen in vector samples collected from Tchitchira/Kéran(22.8%), Bouzalo/Mô(11.3%), Baghan/Mô(2.9%) and Pancerys/Ôti(4.9%); prevalences of O. volvulus infection in S. damnosum s.l. were, respectively, 1%, 0.5%, 0.1% and 0.2%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the northern and central river basins in Togo, interruption of O. volvulus transmission has not yet been attained. Patent O. volvulus infections, positive antibody responses, progressive ocular onchocerciasis were diagnosed, and parasite transmission by S. damnosum s.l. occurred close to the survey locations. Future interventions may require approaches selectively targeted to non-complying endemic populations, to the seasonality of parasite transmission and national onchocerciasis control programs should harmonize cross-border MDA as a coordinated intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006312

  6 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29483756
[Au] Autor:Hopkins A
[Ad] Address:Consultant. Former Director of the Mectizan Donation Programme. Gravesend, UK.
[Ti] Title:Onchocerciasis then and now: achievements, priorities and challenges.
[So] Source:Community Eye Health;30(100):92-95, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0953-6833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29410302
[Au] Autor:Hendy A; Krüger A; Pfarr K; De Witte J; Kibweja A; Mwingira U; Dujardin JC; Post R; Colebunders R; O'Neill S; Kalinga A
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. Electronic address: adam_hendy@hotmail.co.uk.
[Ti] Title:The blackfly vectors and transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in Mahenge, south eastern Tanzania.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;181:50-59, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Mahenge Mountains onchocerciasis focus in south eastern Tanzania was historically one of the most heavily infected areas in the country. The vectors of Onchocerca volvulus are mainly Simulium damnosum complex blackflies, but a species of the Simulium neavei group may also contribute to transmission in some areas. The only detailed studies of parasite transmission in Mahenge were conducted in the late 1960s. The taxonomy of the S. damnosum complex has since been revised and onchocerciasis control through annual community directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) commenced in 1997. This study aimed to provide a cytogenetic and molecular update of the S. damnosum complex cytoforms present in Mahenge, and to evaluate the current status of O. volvulus transmission by blackflies following 19 years of annual CDTI. Rivers were surveyed to identify sites of S. damnosum s.l. breeding among the eastern slopes of the mountains, and human landing collections of adult female blackflies were made close to breeding sites. Identification of S. damnosum complex cytoforms was by cytotaxonomy of late-instar larvae and ITS1 amplicon size polymorphisms of larvae and adults. Adult blackflies were pool screened for O. volvulus infection using a triplex real-time PCR. The cytoforms 'Nkusi', Simulium kilibanum and 'Turiani' were found breeding in perennial rivers. 'Nkusi' and S. kilibanum were collected on human bait at 7/7 catch sites and possessed ITS1 profiles most closely resembling the molecular forms 'Nkusi J' and S. kilibanum 'T'. Whereas 'Turiani' was present in rivers, it was not collected on human bait and appears to be zoophilic. Simulium nyasalandicum was collected in low numbers on human bait at 3/7 catch sites. In total, 12,452 S. damnosum s.l. were pool screened and O. volvulus infection was detected in 97/104 pools of bodies and 51/104 pools of heads. The estimated percentage of S. damnosum s.l. carrying infective L3 stage parasites was 0.57% (95% CI 0.43%-0.74%). Onchocerca volvulus transmission by S. damnosum s.l. is continuing in the Mahenge Mountains after 19 years of annual CDTI. Infection rates appear similar to those reported in the 1960s, but a more detailed study is required to fully understand the epidemiological significance of the ongoing transmission. These results provide further evidence that annual CDTI may be insufficient to eliminate the parasite in formerly hyperendemic foci.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29288080
[Au] Autor:Colebunders R; Nelson Siewe FJ; Hotterbeekx A
[Ad] Address:Global Health Institute, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. Electronic address: robert.colebunders@uantwerpen.be.
[Ti] Title:Onchocerciasis-Associated Epilepsy, an Additional Reason for Strengthening Onchocerciasis Elimination Programs.
[So] Source:Trends Parasitol;34(3):208-216, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1471-5007
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A high prevalence of epilepsy has been observed in onchocerciasis-endemic regions with high onchocerciasis transmission. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that Onchocerca volvulus infection is the trigger causing the seizures, which appear in previously healthy children between the ages of 3 and 18 years. Persons with onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy present with a wide spectrum of seizures, including atonic and myoclonic neck seizures; but also absences and most frequently generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Often individuals present with intellectual disabilities and psychiatric disorders and occasionally with 'Nakalanga' features such as severe stunting with delayed or absent external signs of sexual development. Onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy, because of its importance as a public health problem, is an additional reason for strengthening onchocerciasis elimination programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29175094
[Au] Autor:Omondi EO; Orwa TO; Nyabadza F
[Ad] Address:Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Strathmore University, P.O Box 59857-00200, Nairobi, Kenya; DST/NRF South African Centre for Epidemiological Modeling and Analysis (SACEMA), University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa; Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa. Electronic address: evansotieno@aims.ac.za.
[Ti] Title:Application of optimal control to the onchocerciasis transmission model with treatment.
[So] Source:Math Biosci;297:43-57, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3134
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this paper, we present a model for onchocerciasis that considers mass administration of ivermectin, contact prevention controls and vector elimination. The model equilibria are computed and stability analysis carried out in terms of the basic reproduction number R . The model is found to exhibit a backward bifurcation so that for R less than unity is not sufficient to eradicate the disease from the population and the need is to lower R to below a certain threshold, R for effective disease control. The model is fitted to data on individuals with onchocerciasis in Ghana. A sensitivity analysis reveals that the parameters with the most control over the epidemic are the vector death rate and the effective contact rates between susceptible individuals and infected vector and susceptible vector with infected individuals. This suggests that programs aimed controlling vector will be significantly more effective in combating the disease. Optimal control theory is applied to investigate optimal control strategies for controlling onchocerciasis using insect repellent and both insecticide and larvicide as system control variables. We use Pontryagin's Maximum Principle to show the necessary conditions for the optimal control of onchocerciasis. Numerical simulations of the model show that restricted and proper use of control measures might considerably decrease the number of infections in the human population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 4159 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471346
[Au] Autor:Boakye D; Tallant J; Adjami A; Moussa S; Tekle A; Robalo M; Rebollo M; Mwinza P; Sitima L; Cantey P; Mackenzie C
[Ad] Address:WHO/AFRO/ESPEN Laboratory, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
[Ti] Title:Refocusing vector assessment towards the elimination of onchocerciasis from Africa: a review of the current status in selected countries.
[So] Source:Int Health;10(suppl_1):i27-i32, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1876-3405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Measures to control onchocerciasis have been in place for well over 30 years. Recently, programs have turned from disease control towards transmission elimination. The absence of infective larvae in the black fly Simulium sp. vector is central to defining elimination, and assessments of infectivity by O150 polymerase chain reaction in the vector not only provide valuable information to programs, but are also required for verification of elimination. The status of transmission in black flies was assessed in five countries in the African region during 2014 and 2015. Several of these countries were evaluated because of promising results from epidemiological studies in humans. No infective flies were found in two countries. Infective flies were found in the other three, despite the absence of infection in humans (as evaluated by skin-snip microscopy). Ongoing transmission as demonstrated in the black flies could be due to a variety of factors, including lack of treatment of hypo-endemic areas and cross-border issues. Challenges identified during the course of the entomological work suggest that there is a need for improved selection of vector collection sites and vector collection periods in order to improve fly catches. Two important challenges to achieving elimination identified were definition of the hypo-endemic zones and establishing the existence of areas of cross-border transmission occurring between countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/inthealth/ihx066


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