Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Optic and Nerve and Injuries [Words]
References found : 3269 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 327 go to page                         

  1 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29476565
[Au] Autor:Cen LP; Ng TK; Liang JJ; Zhuang X; Yao X; Yam GH; Chen H; Cheung HS; Zhang M; Pang CP
[Ad] Address:Joint Shantou International Eye Center of Shantou University and The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shantou, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Human Periodontal Ligament-Derived Stem Cells Promote Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Regeneration After Optic Nerve Injury.
[So] Source:Stem Cells;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1549-4918
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Optic neuropathies are the leading cause of irreversible blindness and visual impairment in the developed countries, affecting more than 80 million people worldwide. While most optic neuropathies have no effective treatment, there is intensive research on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) protection and axon regeneration. We previously demonstrated potential of human periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSCs) for retinal cell replacement. Here, we report the neuroprotective effect of human PDLSCs to ameliorate RGC degeneration and promote axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush (ONC) injury. Human PDLSCs were intravitreally injected into the vitreous chamber of adult Fischer rats after ONC in vivo as well as cocultured with retinal explants in vitro. Human PDLSCs survived in the vitreous chamber and were maintained on the RGC layer even at 3 weeks after ONC. Immunofluorescence analysis of ßIII-tubulin and Gap43 showed that the numbers of surviving RGCs and regenerating axons were significantly increased in the rats with human PDLSC transplantation. In vitro coculture experiments confirmed that PDLSCs enhanced RGC survival and neurite regeneration in retinal explants without inducing inflammatory responses. Direct cell-cell interaction and elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor secretion, but not promoting endogenous progenitor cell regeneration, were the RGC protective mechanisms of human PDLSCs. In summary, our results revealed the neuroprotective role of human PDLSCs by strongly promoting RGC survival and axonal regeneration both in vivo and in vitro, indicating a therapeutic potential for RGC protection against optic neuropathies. Stem Cells 2018.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/stem.2812

  2 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29208469
[Au] Autor:van der Merwe Y; Faust AE; Conner I; Gu X; Feturi F; Zhao W; Leonard B; Roy S; Gorantla VS; Venkataramanan R; Washington KM; Wagner WR; Steketee MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States; McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
[Ti] Title:An Elastomeric Polymer Matrix, PEUU-Tac, Delivers Bioactive Tacrolimus Transdurally to the CNS in Rat.
[So] Source:EBioMedicine;26:47-59, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2352-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Central nervous system (CNS) neurons fail to regrow injured axons, often resulting in permanently lost neurologic function. Tacrolimus is an FDA-approved immunosuppressive drug with known neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties in the CNS. However, tacrolimus is typically administered systemically and blood levels required to effectively treat CNS injuries can lead to lethal, off-target organ toxicity. Thus, delivering tacrolimus locally to CNS tissues may provide therapeutic control over tacrolimus levels in CNS tissues while minimizing off-target toxicity. Herein we show an electrospun poly(ester urethane) urea and tacrolimus elastomeric matrix (PEUU-Tac) can deliver tacrolimus trans-durally to CNS tissues. In an acute CNS ischemia model in rat, the optic nerve (ON) was clamped for 10s and then PEUU-Tac was used as an ON wrap and sutured around the injury site. Tacrolimus was detected in PEUU-Tac wrapped ONs at 24h and 14days, without significant increases in tacrolimus blood levels. Similar to systemically administered tacrolimus, PEUU-Tac locally decreased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at the injury site and increased growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression in ischemic ONs from the globe to the chiasm, consistent with decreased astrogliosis and increased retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon growth signaling pathways. These initial results suggest PEUU-Tac is a biocompatible elastic matrix that delivers bioactive tacrolimus trans-durally to CNS tissues without significantly increasing tacrolimus blood levels and off-target toxicity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29414318
[Au] Autor:Valero Y; Boughlala B; Arizcun M; Patel S; Fiksdal IU; Esteban MÁ; De Juan J; Meseguer J; Chaves-Pozo E; Cuesta A
[Ad] Address:Centro Oceanográfico de Murcia, Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO), Carretera de la Azohía s/n, Puerto de Mazarrón, 30860, Murcia, Spain; Grupo de Marcadores Inmunológicos, Laboratorio de Genética e Inmunología Molecular, Instituto de Biología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Val
[Ti] Title:Genes related to cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon response are induced in the retina of European sea bass upon intravitreal infection with nodavirus.
[So] Source:Fish Shellfish Immunol;74:627-636, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Viral diseases are responsible for high rates of mortality and subsequent economic losses in modern aquaculture. The nervous necrosis virus (NNV) produces viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER), which affects the central nervous system, is considered one of the most serious viral diseases in marine aquaculture. Although some studies have localized NNV in the retina cells, none has dealt with immunity in the retina. Thus, for the first time, we intravitreally infected healthy specimens of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) with NNV with the aim of characterizing the immune response in the retina. Ultrastructural analysis detected important retinal injuries and structure degradation, including pycnosis, hydropic degeneration and vacuolization in some cell layers as well as myelin sheaths in the optic nerve fibres. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that NNV replicated in the eyes. Regarding retinal immunity, NNV infection elicited the transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in the interferon (IFN) and cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) responses as well as B and T cell markers, demonstrating that viral replication influences innate and adaptive responses. Further studies are needed to understand the retina immunity and whether the main retinal function, vision, is affected by nodavirus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29425209
[Au] Autor:Chiha W; LeVaillant CJ; Bartlett CA; Hewitt AW; Melton PE; Fitzgerald M; Harvey AR
[Ad] Address:Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Retinal genes are differentially expressed in areas of primary versus secondary degeneration following partial optic nerve injury.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192348, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Partial transection (PT) of the optic nerve is an established experimental model of secondary degeneration in the central nervous system. After a dorsal transection, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with axons in ventral optic nerve are intact but vulnerable to secondary degeneration, whereas RGCs in dorsal retina with dorsal axons are affected by primary and secondary injuries. Using microarray, we quantified gene expression changes in dorsal and ventral retina at 1 and 7 days post PT, to characterize pathogenic pathways linked to primary and secondary degeneration. RESULTS: In comparison to uninjured retina Cryba1, Cryba2 and Crygs, were significantly downregulated in injured dorsal retina at days 1 and 7. While Ecel1, Timp1, Mt2A and CD74, which are associated with reducing excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation, were significantly upregulated. Genes associated with oxygen binding pathways, immune responses, cytokine receptor activity and apoptosis were enriched in dorsal retina at day 1 after PT. Oxygen binding and apoptosis remained enriched at day 7, as were pathways involved in extracellular matrix modification. Fewer changes were observed in ventral retina at day 1 after PT, most associated with the regulation of protein homodimerization activity. By day 7, apoptosis, matrix organization and signal transduction pathways were enriched. Discriminant analysis was also performed for specific functional gene groups to compare expression intensities at each time point. Altered expression of selected genes (ATF3, GFAP, Ecel1, TIMP1, Tp53) and proteins (GFAP, ECEL1 and ATF3) were semi-quantitatively assessed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively. CONCLUSION: There was an acute and complex primary injury response in dorsal retina indicative of a dynamic interaction between neuroprotective and neurodegenerative events; ventral retina vulnerable to secondary degeneration showed a delayed injury response. Both primary and secondary injury resulted in the upregulation of numerous genes linked to RGC death, but differences in the nature of these changes strongly suggest that death occurred via different molecular mechanisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192348

  5 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29420144
[Au] Autor:Gilbert AL; Chwalisz B; Mallery R
[Ad] Address:a Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology , Massachusetts Eye & Ear, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Complications of Optic Nerve Sheath Fenestration as a Treatment for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.
[So] Source:Semin Ophthalmol;33(1):36-41, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5205
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are a number of surgical options for treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) when it is refractory to medical treatment and weight loss. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) is one of these options. Use of this procedure varies among centers due to experience with the procedure and concern for associated complications that can result in severe loss of vision. This review summarizes the literature concerning post-surgical complications of ONSF for IIH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blindness
Decompression, Surgical/adverse effects
Neurosurgical Procedures/adverse effects
Optic Nerve Injuries/etiology
Optic Nerve/surgery
Papilledema/surgery
Pseudotumor Cerebri/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Blindness/epidemiology
Blindness/etiology
Blindness/physiopathology
Humans
Optic Nerve/pathology
Optic Nerve Injuries/diagnosis
Optic Nerve Injuries/physiopathology
Papilledema/diagnosis
Papilledema/etiology
Postoperative Complications
Pseudotumor Cerebri/physiopathology
Pseudotumor Cerebri/surgery
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/08820538.2017.1353810

  6 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29330870
[Au] Autor:Gómez RM; Sánchez MY; Portela-Lomba M; Ghotme K; Barreto GE; Sierra J; Moreno-Flores MT
[Ad] Address:Fundación de Neuroregeneración en Colombia, Grupo de investigación NeuroRec, Bogota D.C, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:Cell therapy for spinal cord injury with olfactory ensheathing glia cells (OECs).
[So] Source:Glia;, 2018 Jan 13.
[Is] ISSN:1098-1136
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The prospects of achieving regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) have changed, as most recent findings indicate that several species, including humans, can produce neurons in adulthood. Studies targeting this property may be considered as potential therapeutic strategies to respond to injury or the effects of demyelinating diseases in the CNS. While CNS trauma may interrupt the axonal tracts that connect neurons with their targets, some neurons remain alive, as seen in optic nerve and spinal cord (SC) injuries (SCIs). The devastating consequences of SCIs are due to the immediate and significant disruption of the ascending and descending spinal pathways, which result in varying degrees of motor and sensory impairment. Recent therapeutic studies for SCI have focused on cell transplantation in animal models, using cells capable of inducing axon regeneration like Schwann cells (SchCs), astrocytes, genetically modified fibroblasts and olfactory ensheathing glia cells (OECs). Nevertheless, and despite the improvements in such cell-based therapeutic strategies, there is still little information regarding the mechanisms underlying the success of transplantation and regarding any secondary effects. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify these issues. In this review, we highlight the properties of OECs that make them suitable to achieve neuroplasticity/neuroregeneration in SCI. OECs can interact with the glial scar, stimulate angiogenesis, axon outgrowth and remyelination, improving functional outcomes following lesion. Furthermore, we present evidence of the utility of cell therapy with OECs to treat SCI, both from animal models and clinical studies performed on SCI patients, providing promising results for future treatments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180113
[Lr] Last revision date:180113
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/glia.23282

  7 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29288709
[Au] Autor:Karimi A; Razaghi R; Biglari H; Sera T; Kudo S
[Ad] Address:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan. Electronic address: karimi@kyudai.jp.
[Ti] Title:Collision of the glass shards with the eye: A computational fluid-structure interaction model.
[So] Source:J Chem Neuroanat;90:80-86, 2017 Dec 27.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6300
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The main stream of blunt trauma injuries has been reported to be related to the automobile crashes, sporting activities, and military operations. Glass shards, which can be induced due to car accident, earthquake, gunshot, etc., might collide with the eye and trigger substantial scarring and, consequently, permanently affect the vision. The complications as a result of the collision with the eye and its following injuries on each component of the eye are difficult to be diagnosed. The objective of this study was to employ a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye to assess the results of the glass shards collision with the eye. To do this, a rigid steel-based object hit a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) glass wall at the velocities of 100, 150, and 200 m/s and, subsequently, the resultant glass shards moved toward the eye. The amount of injury, then, quantified in terms of the stresses and strains. The results revealed the highest amount of stress in the cornea while the lowest one was observed in the vitreous body. It was also found that increasing the speed of the glass shards amplifies the amount of the stress in the components which are located in the central anterior zone of the eye, such as the cornea, aqueous body, and iris. However, regarding those components located in the peripheral/posterior side of the eye, especially the optic nerve, by increasing the amount of velocity a reduction in the stresses was observed and the optic nerve is hardly damaged. These findings have associations not only for understanding the amount of stresses/strains in the eye components at three different velocities, but also for providing preliminary information for the ophthalmologists to have a better diagnosis after glass shards (small objects impact) injuries to the eye.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180111
[Lr] Last revision date:180111
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29271420
[Au] Autor:Chopra N; Gervasio KA; Kalosza B; Wu AY
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Gun trauma and ophthalmic outcomes.
[So] Source:Eye (Lond);, 2017 Dec 22.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5454
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PurposeThis retrospective cohort study assesses the visual outcomes of patients who survive gunshot wounds to the head.MethodsThe Elmhurst City Hospital Trauma Registry and Mount Sinai Data Warehouse were queried for gun trauma resulting in ocular injury over a 16-year period. Thirty-one patients over 16 years of age were found who suffered a gunshot wound to the head and resultant ocular trauma: orbital fracture, ruptured globe, foreign body, or optic nerve injury. Gun types included all firearms and air guns. Nine patients were excluded due to incorrect coding or unavailable charts. Statistical analysis was performed using a simple bivariate analysis (χ ).ResultsOf the 915 victims of gun trauma to the head, 27 (3.0%) sustained ocular injuries. Of the 22 patients whose records were accessible, 18 survived. Eight of the 18 surviving patients (44%) suffered long-term visual damage, defined as permanent loss of vision in at least one eye to the level of counting fingers or worse. Neither location of injury (P=0.243), nor type of gun used (P=0.296), nor cause of gun trauma (P=0.348) predicted visual loss outcome. The Glasgow Coma Scale eye response score on arrival to the hospital also did not predict visual loss outcome (P=0.793).ConclusionThere has been a dearth of research into gun trauma and even less research on the visual outcomes following gun trauma. Our study finds that survivors of gun trauma to the head suffer long-term visual damage 44% of the time after injury.Eye advance online publication, 22 December 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.249.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/eye.2017.249

  9 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29204649
[Au] Autor:Nickells RW; Schmitt HM; Maes ME; Schlamp CL
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States.
[Ti] Title:AAV2-Mediated Transduction of the Mouse Retina After Optic Nerve Injury.
[So] Source:Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci;58(14):6091-6104, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-5783
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: Gene therapy of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has promise as a powerful therapeutic for the rescue and regeneration of these cells after optic nerve damage. However, early after damage, RGCs undergo atrophic changes, including gene silencing. It is not known if these changes will deleteriously affect transduction and transgene expression, or if the therapeutic protein can influence reactivation of the endogenous genome. Methods: Double-transgenic mice carrying a Rosa26-(LoxP)-tdTomato reporter, and a mutant allele for the proapoptotic Bax gene were reared. The Bax mutant blocks apoptosis, but RGCs still exhibit nuclear atrophy and gene silencing. At times ranging from 1 hour to 4 weeks after optic nerve crush (ONC), eyes received an intravitreal injection of AAV2 virus carrying the Cre recombinase. Successful transduction was monitored by expression of the tdTomato reporter. Immunostaining was used to localize tdTomato expression in select cell types. Results: Successful transduction of RGCs was achieved at all time points after ONC using AAV2 expressing Cre from the phosphoglycerate kinase (Pgk) promoter, but not the CMV promoter. ONC promoted an increase in the transduction of cell types in the inner nuclear layer, including Müller cells and rod bipolar neurons. There was minimal evidence of transduction of amacrine cells and astrocytes in the inner retina or optic nerve. Conclusions: Damaged RGCs can be transduced and at least some endogenous genes can be subsequently activated. Optic nerve damage may change retinal architecture to allow greater penetration of an AAV2 virus to transduce several additional cell types in the inner nuclear layer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Therapy/methods
Optic Nerve Injuries/genetics
Optic Nerve/metabolism
Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics
Retinal Ganglion Cells/ultrastructure
Transduction, Genetic/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Genetic Vectors
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
Optic Nerve/ultrastructure
Optic Nerve Injuries/metabolism
Optic Nerve Injuries/therapy
RNA/genetics
Receptors, Cell Surface/biosynthesis
Retinal Ganglion Cells/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (KIAA0319L protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, Cell Surface); 63231-63-0 (RNA)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/iovs.17-22634

  10 / 3269 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29164563
[Au] Autor:Wei J; Ma LS; Liu DJ; Guo J; Jiang WK; Yu HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Yantai Shan Hospital, Yantai, China. yantaidr88@126.com.
[Ti] Title:Melatonin regulates traumatic optic neuropathy via targeting autophagy.
[So] Source:Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci;21(21):4946-4951, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2284-0729
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) usually refers to the indirect damage to the optical nerve, which can cause partial or complete blindness. Melatonin (MT) is a kind of indole hormone, and the retina is one of its natural sites of secretion in the human body. This study aims to explore MT in the retina and optic nerve injuries due to TON. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used for TON model in the study. After operation, rats were treated with MT or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days before sacrifice. The changes in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were observed via hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining was applied to observe apoptosis. Immunofluorescence staining was applied to detect caspase-3 and Western blot was used to detect LC3, cleaved caspase-3 and glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). RESULTS: The number of RGCs in MT group increased compared to the model group. After MT treatment, the increased number of TUNEL positive cells and the increased number of caspase-3 positive cells in the retina of MT group was alleviated. Moreover, Western blot analysis revealed that the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the retinal tissue of MT group was further increased, while the increased cleaved caspase-3 protein level in the retina of MT group was alleviated compared to the model group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study revealed that MT therapy affects the apoptosis level of RGCs after TON through alleviating the increased caspase-3 protein level. Its mechanism may be that it further up-regulates the autophagy level of RGCs after TON, ultimately inhibiting the apoptosis of RGCs after TON and playing a neuroprotective role.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171122
[Lr] Last revision date:171122
[St] Status:In-Process


page 1 of 327 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information