Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Orobanche [Words]
References found : 262 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 27 go to page                         

  1 / 262 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29446095
[Au] Autor:Gao W; Wang YS; Qu ZY; Hwang E; Ngo HTT; Wang YP; Bae J; Yi TH
[Ad] Address:Department of Oriental Medicinal Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1732, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 17104, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Orobanche cernua Loefling Attenuates Ultraviolet B-mediated Photoaging in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.
[So] Source:Photochem Photobiol;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1751-1097
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UV radiation is the primary cause of skin photoaging, which results in an increase in matrix metalloproteinases and degradation of collagen. Developing new natural antioxidant as photoprotective agents have become a popular area of research. Orobanche cernua Loefling is a parasitic plant that is rich in phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs). This study investigated the photoprotective effects of the ethanolic extract of Orobanche cernua Loefling (OC) and its principal component acteoside on UVB-induced photoaging as well as their underlying molecular mechanisms in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Biological testing demonstrated that OC and acteoside possessed significant photoprotective activities, reducing MMP and IL-6 levels while improving type I procollagen synthesis in UVB-irradiated NHDFs. Further study showed that the protective mechanisms were the improvement of transcription factor Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defensive system, suppression of MAPK/AP-1 and activation of the TGF-ß/Smad pathway. Together, our results suggested that OC might be a promising anti-photoaging agent against UV radiation induced skin damage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/php.12908

  2 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29385517
[Au] Autor:Zwanenburg B; Blanco-Ania D; Prandi C
[Ad] Address:Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Cluster of Organic Chemistry, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Strigolactones: new plant hormones in the spotlight.
[So] Source:J Exp Bot;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The development and growth of plants are regulated by interplay of a plethora of complex chemical reactions in which plant hormones play a pivotal role. In recent years, a group of new plant hormones, namely strigolactones (SLs), was discovered and identified. The first SL, strigol, was isolated in 1966, but it took almost 20 years before the details of its structure were fully elucidated. At present, two families of SLs are known, one having the stereochemistry of (+)-strigol and the other that of (-)-orobanchol, the most abundant naturally occurring SL. The most well-known bioproperty of SLs is the germination of seeds of the parasitic weeds Striga and Orobanche. It is evident that SLs are going to play a prominent role in modern molecular botany. In this review, relevant molecular and bioproperties of SLs are discussed. Items of importance are the effect of stereochemistry, structure-activity relationships, design and synthesis of analogues with a simple structure, but with retention of bioactivity, introduction of fluorescent labels into SLs, biosynthetic origin of SLs, mode of action in plants, application in agriculture for the control of parasitic weeds, stimulation of the branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the control of plant architecture. The future potential of SLs in molecular botany is highlighted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jxb/erx487

  3 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29151642
[Au] Autor:Aybeke M
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Trakya University, Balkan Campus, 22030 Edirne, Turkey.
[Ti] Title: Infection Causes Phenolic Accumulations and Hormonal Disorders in spp.
[So] Source:Indian J Microbiol;57(4):416-421, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0046-8991
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The physiological effects of on in-root parasitic weed, spp. (broomrape) with references to change in plant hormones and secondary plant constituents were investigated. The levels of IAA, GA, ABA and JA in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group, while the level of SA was higher in the experimental group. In secondary metabolic studies, the quantities of various phenols were measured in the two groups and catechin, syringic acid and p-coumaric acid amounts were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group, unlike gallic acid which have a lower amount. Consequently, in the light of all data, it was concluded that (1) causes heavy hormonal disorder, (2) triggered only SA-mediated defense and (3) induced intensively accumulation of phenolic substances in orobanche. causes lethal physiological damage on spp.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171122
[Lr] Last revision date:171122
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12088-017-0669-x

  4 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29027429
[Au] Autor:Zhang QR
[Ad] Address:Dispensary of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wenzhou People's Hospital, Wenzhou 325000, China.
[Ti] Title:[A new phenethyl alcohol glycoside from Orobanche coerulescens].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi;42(6):1136-1139, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1001-5302
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:The constituents of the whole plant of Orobanche coerulescens were isolated and purified by using various column chromatographic techniques including D101, silica gel and ODS. The structures were identified by spectroscopic analyses including NMR and MS. A new phenylethanol glycoside was isolated from the whole plant of O. coerulescens, and was identified as 2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol-1-O- [(1→3)-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-4, 6-O-di-feruloyl]-ß-D-glucopyranoside, named as orobancheoside B. Through the antibacterial activity test, orobancheoside B was proved to have certain antibacterial activity, and be one of the main active components of O. coerulescens. The research result will laid a foundation for the medicinal materials and quality control research. Activity screening, broomrape orobancheoside B has certain antibacterial activity, as one of the main active components of O. coerulescens, and to constantly improve the quality of the medicinal materials laid a foundation.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.19540/j.cnki.cjcmm.2017.0034

  5 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28791437
[Au] Autor:Ocaña-Moral S; Gutiérrez N; Torres AM; Madrid E
[Ad] Address:Área de Genómica y Biotecnología, IFAPA Centro Alameda del Obispo, Apdo 3092, 14080, Córdoba, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Saturation mapping of regions determining resistance to Ascochyta blight and broomrape in faba bean using transcriptome-based SNP genotyping.
[So] Source:Theor Appl Genet;130(11):2271-2282, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2242
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:KEY MESSAGE: Transcriptome-based SNP markers were genotyped in a faba bean map to saturate regions bearing QTL for Ascochyta fabae and broomrape and distinguish positional and functional candidates underlying both resistances. Faba bean is an important food crop worldwide. Marker-assisted selection for disease resistance is a top priority in current faba bean research programs, with pathogens such as Ascochyta fabae and broomrape (Orobanche crenata) being among the major constraints in global faba bean production. However, progress in genetics and genomics in this species has lagged behind that of other grain legumes. Although genetic maps are available, most markers are not in or are too distant from target genes to enable an accurate prediction of the desired phenotypes. In this study, a set of SNP markers located in gene coding regions was selected using transcriptomic data. Ninety-two new SNP markers were genotyped to obtain the most complete map reported so far in the 29H × Vf136 faba bean population. Most of the QTL regions previously described in this cross were enriched with SNP markers. Two QTLs for O. crenata resistance (Oc7 and Oc8) were confirmed. Oc7 and Oc10 located nearby a QTL for A. fabae resistance suggested that these genomic regions might encode common resistance mechanisms and could be targets for selection strategies against both pathogens. We also confirmed three regions in chromosomes II (Af2), III (Af3) and VI associated with Ascochyta blight resistance. The QTLs ratified in the present study are now flanked by or include reliable SNP markers in their intervals. This new information provides a valuable starting point in the search for relevant positional and functional candidates underlying both types of resistance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ascomycota
Disease Resistance/genetics
Orobanche
Plant Diseases/genetics
Vicia faba/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromosome Mapping
Genetic Markers
Genotyping Techniques
Phenotype
Plant Diseases/microbiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Quantitative Trait Loci
Transcriptome
Vicia faba/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Genetic Markers)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00122-017-2958-5

  6 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28618117
[Au] Autor:Yang C; Xu L; Zhang N; Islam F; Song W; Hu L; Liu D; Xie X; Zhou W
[Ad] Address:Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Crop Germplasm, Institute of Crop Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:iTRAQ-based proteomics of sunflower cultivars differing in resistance to parasitic weed Orobanche cumana.
[So] Source:Proteomics;17(13-14), 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1615-9861
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Orobanche cumana is an obligate root parasite causing severe damage to many economically important crops, including sunflowers worldwide. For efficient control measures, it is necessary to understand the resistant mechanism during interaction at molecular level. The present study emphasizes on comparative proteomics to investigate the mechanistic basis of compatible and incompatible interaction of O. cumana with resistant (JY207) and susceptible (TK0409) sunflowers. More than 3500 proteins were identified from two cultivars by iTRAQ analysis. Identified proteins associated with general functions, posttranslational modification, energy production and conversion, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and signal transduction mechanisms were the most represented category of induced proteins in both cultivars. The resistant interaction was characterized by alteration of defense-related proteins involved in recognition of parasites, accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins, biosynthesis of lignin, and detoxification of toxic metabolites in JY207 after inoculation. The susceptible interaction was characterized by decreased abundance of proteins involved in biosynthesis and signaling of plant growth regulators including auxin, gibberellin, brassinosteroid, and ethylene in TK0409 after inoculation. The present study provides comprehensive details of proteins and differential modulation of pathways regulated under compatible and incompatible interaction, allowing the identification of important molecular components for development of sustainable resistance against this parasite.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170717
[Lr] Last revision date:170717
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/pmic.201700009

  7 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28602401
[Au] Autor:Aybeke M
[Ad] Address:Trakya University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Balcan Campus, 22030 Edirne, Turkey. Electronic address: mehmetaybeke@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Fusarium infection causes genotoxic disorders and antioxidant-based damages in Orobanche spp.
[So] Source:Microbiol Res;201:46-51, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0623
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aims to evaluate the toxic effects of Fusarium oxysporum on root parasitic weed, Orobanche spp. Comparative genetic and gene expression studies were conducted on uninfected and fungus-infected orobanches. In genetic studies, isolated total DNA was amplified by RAPD PCR. Fragment properties were analysed by GTS test. According to the results, the fragment properties of control and Fusarium infected (experimental) groups varied widely; and it has been observed that Fusarium has genotoxic effects on the DNA of orobanches. In gene expression studies, the expression levels of genes encoding enzymes or proteins were associated with ROS damage and toxic effects, therefore, gene expressions of Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), Zn-superoxide dismutase (=SOD2, mitochondrial), glutamine synthetase (GS), heat shock protein gene (HSP70), BAX, Caspase-3 and BCL2 were significantly higher in the experimental group. In the light of obtained data, it was concluded that F. oxysporum (1) caused heavy ROS damage in Orobanche (2) induced significant irrevocable genotoxic effects on the DNA of Orobanche, (3) degraded protein metabolism and synthesis, and finally (4) triggered apoptosis. The results of this study can be a ground for further research on reducing the toxic effects of Fusarium on agricultural products, so that advancements in bio-herbicide technology may provide a sustainable agricultural production.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antioxidants/adverse effects
Fusariosis
Fusarium/pathogenicity
Genome, Plant/drug effects
Mycotoxins/pharmacology
Orobanche/microbiology
Plant Diseases/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biological Control Agents
Caspase 3/genetics
DNA, Plant/drug effects
DNA, Plant/isolation & purification
Fusariosis/microbiology
Fusarium/drug effects
Fusarium/physiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant/drug effects
Glutamate-Ammonia Ligase/genetics
Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics
Herbicides/metabolism
Herbicides/pharmacology
Mitochondria/enzymology
Mitochondria/genetics
Mutagenicity Tests/methods
Mycotoxins/metabolism
Plant Roots/microbiology
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/genetics
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique/methods
Superoxide Dismutase/genetics
bcl-2-Associated X Protein/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Biological Control Agents); 0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (Heat-Shock Proteins); 0 (Herbicides); 0 (Mycotoxins); 0 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2); 0 (bcl-2-Associated X Protein); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase); EC 1.15.1.1 (superoxide dismutase 2); EC 3.4.22.- (Caspase 3); EC 6.3.1.2 (Glutamate-Ammonia Ligase)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171002
[Lr] Last revision date:171002
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170613
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28559897
[Au] Autor:Venezian A; Dor E; Achdari G; Plakhine D; Smirnov E; Hershenhorn J
[Ad] Address:Efal Agri Ltd.Netanya, Israel.
[Ti] Title:The Influence of the Plant Growth Regulator Maleic Hydrazide on Egyptian Broomrape Early Developmental Stages and Its Control Efficacy in Tomato under Greenhouse and Field Conditions.
[So] Source:Front Plant Sci;8:691, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-462X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Broomrapes ( spp. and spp.) are holoparasitic plants that cause tremendous losses of agricultural crops worldwide. Broomrape control is extremely difficult and only amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides present an acceptable control level. It is expected that broomrape resistance to these herbicides is not long in coming. Our objective was to develop a broomrape control system in tomato ( L.) based on the plant growth regulator maleic hydrazide (MH). Petri-dish and polyethylene-bag system experiments revealed that MH has a slight inhibitory effect on seed germination but is a potent inhibitor of the first stages of parasitism, namely attachment and the tubercle stage. MH phytotoxicity toward tomato and its -control efficacy were tested in greenhouse experiments. MH was applied at 25, 50, 75, 150, 300, and 600 g a.i. ha to tomato foliage grown in -infested soil at 200 growing degree days (GDD) and again at 400 GDD. The treatments had no influence on tomato foliage or root dry weight. The total number of attachments counted on the roots of the treated plants was significantly lower at 75 g a.i. ha and also at higher MH rates. biomass was close to zero at rates of 150, 300, and 600 g a.i. ha MH. Field experiments were conducted to optimize the rate, timing and number of MH applications. Two application sequences gave superior results, both with five split applications applied at 100, 200, 400, 700, and 1000 GDD: (a) constant rate of 400 g a.i. ha ; (b) first two applications at 270 g a.i. ha and the next three applications at 540 g a.i. ha . Based on the results of this study, MH was registered for use in Israel in 2013 with the specified protocol and today, it is widely used by most Israeli tomato growers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fpls.2017.00691

  9 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28289424
[Au] Autor:Shilo T; Rubin B; Plakhine D; Gal S; Amir R; Hacham Y; Wolf S; Eizenberg H
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya'ar Research CenterRamat Yishay, Israel; The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics, The Hebrew University of JerusalemRehov
[Ti] Title:Secondary Effects of Glyphosate Action in : Inhibition of Solute Transport from the Host Plant to the Parasite.
[So] Source:Front Plant Sci;8:255, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-462X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:It is currently held that glyphosate efficiently controls the obligate holoparasite (Egyptian broomrape) by inhibiting its endogenous shikimate pathway, thereby causing a deficiency in aromatic amino acids (AAA). While there is no argument regarding the shikimate pathway being the primary site of the herbicide's action, the fact that the parasite receives a constant supply of nutrients, including proteins and amino acids, from the host does not fit with an AAA deficiency. This apparent contradiction implies that glyphosate mechanism of action in is probably more complex and does not end with the inhibition of the AAA biosynthetic pathway alone. A possible explanation would lie in a limitation of the translocation of solutes from the host as a secondary effect. We examined the following hypotheses: (a) glyphosate does not affects during its independent phase and (b) glyphosate has a secondary effect on the ability of to attract nutrients, limiting the translocation to the parasite. By using a glyphosate-resistant host plant expressing the "phloem-mobile" green fluorescent protein (GFP), it was shown that glyphosate interacts specifically with , initiating a deceleration of GFP translocation to the parasite within 24 h of treatment. Additionally, changes in the entire sugars profile (together with that of other metabolites) of were induced by glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate did not impair germination or seedling development of but begun to exert its action only after the parasite has established a connection to the host vascular system and became exposed to the herbicide. Our findings thus indicate that glyphosate does indeed have a secondary effect in , probably as a consequence of its primary target inhibition-via inhibition of the translocation of phloem-mobile solutes to the parasite, as was simulated by the mobile GFP. The observed disruption in the metabolism of major sugars that are abundant in within 48 h after glyphosate treatment provides a possible explanation for this inhibition of translocation and might reflect a critical secondary effect of the herbicide's primary action that results in loss of the parasite's superior sink for solutes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fpls.2017.00255

  10 / 262 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28262967
[Au] Autor:Decker EL; Alder A; Hunn S; Ferguson J; Lehtonen MT; Scheler B; Kerres KL; Wiedemann G; Safavi-Rizi V; Nordzieke S; Balakrishna A; Baz L; Avalos J; Valkonen JPT; Reski R; Al-Babili S
[Ad] Address:Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestr. 1, Freiburg, 79104, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Strigolactone biosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved, regulated by phosphate starvation and contributes to resistance against phytopathogenic fungi in a moss, Physcomitrella patens.
[So] Source:New Phytol;216(2):455-468, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In seed plants, strigolactones (SLs) regulate architecture and induce mycorrhizal symbiosis in response to environmental cues. SLs are formed by combined activity of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) 7 and 8 from 9-cis-ß-carotene, leading to carlactone that is converted by cytochromes P450 (clade 711; MAX1 in Arabidopsis) into various SLs. As Physcomitrella patens possesses CCD7 and CCD8 homologs but lacks MAX1, we investigated if PpCCD7 together with PpCCD8 form carlactone and how deletion of these enzymes influences growth and interactions with the environment. We investigated the enzymatic activity of PpCCD7 and PpCCD8 in vitro, identified the formed products by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and LC-MS, and generated and analysed ΔCCD7 and ΔCCD8 mutants. We defined enzymatic activity of PpCCD7 as a stereospecific 9-cis-CCD and PpCCD8 as a carlactone synthase. ΔCCD7 and ΔCCD8 lines showed enhanced caulonema growth, which was revertible by adding the SL analogue GR24 or carlactone. Wild-type (WT) exudates induced seed germination in Orobanche ramosa. This activity was increased upon phosphate starvation and abolished in exudates of both mutants. Furthermore, both mutants showed increased susceptibility to phytopathogenic fungi. Our study reveals the deep evolutionary conservation of SL biosynthesis, SL function, and its regulation by biotic and abiotic cues.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170918
[Lr] Last revision date:170918
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.14506


page 1 of 27 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information