Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524713
[Au] Autor:Aoun SG; Bedros N; El Ahmadieh TY; Kreck J; Mehta N; Al Tamimi M
[Ti] Title:Osteodiscitis of the Lumbar Spine Due To a Migrated Fractured Inferior Vena Cava Filter: Case Report.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism can be a significant cause of morbidity in the trauma population. Medical and surgical specialties have been pushing the indication for prophylactic filter placement. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 36-year-old man presented with axial lower back pain with a radicular right L2 component after lifting a heavy object. He had a history of penetrating brain trauma 3 years prior, with placement of a prophylactic inferior vena cava filter. His x-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine showed fracture of his filter, with migration of the fractured fragment through the inferior vena cava and into the L2-L3 disc space, and surrounding bony lysis and severe osteodiscitis. He was treated medically with intravenous and then oral antibiotics and improved clinically and radiographically. CONCLUSIONS: Conservative use of filter devices and early retrieval once their indication expires is paramount to avoid unnecessary complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524152
[Au] Autor:Kierzkowska M; Pedzisz P; Babiak I; Janowicz J; Kulig M; Majewska A; Sawicka-Grzelak A; Mlynarczyk G
[Ad] Address:Chair and Department of Medical Microbiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Chalubinskiego 5 Str, 02-004, Warsaw, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Difficulties in identifying the bacterial species from the genus Clostridium in a case of injury-related osteitis.
[So] Source:Folia Microbiol (Praha);, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1874-9356
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most Clostridium species are part of saprophytic microflora in humans and animals; however, some are well-known human pathogens. We presented the challenges in identifying the Clostridium species isolated from a patient with an infected open dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the fourth digit of the right hand. The clinical materials were intraoperative samples collected from a patient diagnosed with an injury-related infection, with soft tissue loss and tendon sheath involvement. The available biochemical, molecular, and genetic techniques were used in identifying the isolated bacteria. The isolated bacterium was shown to have low biochemical activity; hence, it was not definitively identified via biochemical tests Api 20A or Rapid 32A. Vitek 2 and mass spectrometry methods were equally inconclusive. Clostridium tetani infection was strongly suspected based on the bacterium's morphology and the appearance of its colonies on solid media. It was only via the 16S rRNA sequencing method, which is non-routine and unavailable in most clinical laboratories, that this pathogen was excluded. Despite appropriate pre-laboratory procedures, which are critical for obtaining reliable test results, the routine methods of anaerobic bacterium identification are not always useful in diagnostics. Diagnostic difficulties occur in the case of environment-derived bacteria of low or not fully understood biological activity, which are absent from databases of automatic bacterial identification systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12223-018-0597-0

  3 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377928
[Au] Autor:Büren C; Lögters T; Oezel L; Rommelfanger G; Scholz AO; Windolf J; Windolf CD
[Ad] Address:Department for Trauma- and Hand Surgery, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf Moorenstraße 5, Düsseldorf, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) on implant-associated osteitis in a femur fracture model in mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191594, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) is applied very successfully in treatment of various diseases such as chronic wounds. It has been already suggested as adjunctive treatment option for osteitis by immune- and fracture modulating effects. This study evaluates the importance of HBO in an early implant-associated localized osteitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA) compared to the standard therapy. In a standardized murine model the left femur of 120 BALB/c mice were osteotomized and fixed by a titanium locking plate. Osteitis has been induced with a defined amount of SA into the fracture gap. Debridément and lavages were progressed on day 7, 14, 28 and 56 to determine the local bacterial growth and the immune reaction. Hyperbaric oxygen (2 ATA, 90%) was applied for 90 minutes on day 7 to 21 for those mice allocated to HBO therapy. To evaluate the effect of HBO therapy the following groups were analyzed: Two sham-groups (12 mice / group) with and without HBO therapy, two osteotomy groups (24 mice / group) with plate osteosynthesis of the femur with and without HBO therapy, and two osteotomy SA infection groups (24 mice / group) with and without HBO therapy. Fracture healing was also quantified on day 7, 14, 28 and 56 by a.p. x-ray and bone healing markers from blood samples. Progression of infection was assessed by estimation of colony-forming units (CFU) and immune response was analyzed by determination of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), Interleukin (IL) - 6, and the circulating free DNA (cfDNA) in lavage samples. Osteitis induced significantly higher IL-6, cfDNA- and PMN-levels in the lavage samples (on day 7 and 14, each p < 0.05). HBO-therapy did not have a significant influence on the CFU and immune response compared to the standard therapy (each p > 0.05). At the same time HBO-therapy was associated with a delayed bone healing assessed by x-ray radiography and a higher rate of non-union until day 28. In conclusion, osteitis led to significantly higher bacterial count and infection parameters. HBO-therapy neither had a beneficial influence on local infection nor on immune response or fracture healing compared to the standard therapy in an osteitis mouse model.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disease Models, Animal
Femoral Fractures/physiopathology
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Osteitis/etiology
Prostheses and Implants
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Femoral Fractures/complications
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191594

  4 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519910
[Au] Autor:Rockwood N; Nwokolo N
[Ad] Address:Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Syphilis the great pretender: when is cancer not cancer?
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The number of cases of syphilis continues to rise in the UK, USA and elsewhere and may present to a variety of clinical specialties. We report a complex case of early acquired disseminated syphilis causing an ulceronodular rash (lues maligna), orchitis, osteitis and lung nodules in an immunocompetent man who has sex with men who presented to the genitourinary medicine clinic. Syphilis should be considered in the differential diagnoses of multiple clinical presentations and optimal management should involve multidisciplinary care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29504342
[Au] Autor:Rashid H; Hussain A; Sheikh AH; Azam K; Malik S; Amin M
[Ad] Address:Dow International Dental College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Measure Of Frequency Of Alveolar Osteitis Using Two Different Methods Of Osteotomy In Mandibular Third Molar Impactions: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad;30(1):103-106, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1819-2718
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dento-alveolar surgical procedures involving third molar teeth are the most common surgical procedure in the field of surgery. The objective of this research was to analyse the impact of surgery on the incidence of alveolar osteitis after surgical removal of mandibular third molar and to compare two different bone cutting methods following impacted mandibular third molar surgery.. METHODS: This double blinded randomized clinical trial was executed at the OPD of Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi. The study duration was four months. It was conducted on 60 patients needing unilateral mandibular third molar impaction removal. Patients were randomized to two groups (i.e., physio dispenser group and slow speed handpiece group) before surgery. The surgical procedure was performed under local anaesthesia by using standardized cross infection protocol. The frequency of alveolar osteitis was evaluated on thirdday postoperatively. Alveolar osteitis was diagnosed and confirmed by patient's history and clinical evaluation. Post-operative sequelae were observed and recorded objectively. RESULTS: Out of 60 patients', five patients experienced alveolar osteitis, and the incidence rate was 8.3%. A significant pvalue of 0.000 was calculated using binomial test for comparison of alveolar osteitis among both groups. Inter-examiner reliability was assessed by kappa and good (62%) agreement, which was found among the examiners, who diagnosed alveolar osteitis clinically. Post-operative sequelae were insignificant in slow speed hand piece group. CONCLUSIONS: It was observed that alveolar osteitis was reported in physio-dispenser group; similarly, post-operative complications were also more in this group as compared with slow speed-hand piece group. No surgical complications were observed in slow speed-hand piece group suggesting slow speed hand piece mode of osteotomy to be safer for third molar extraction as compared with physio-dispenser.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498916
[Au] Autor:Pal R; Bhadada SK; Pathak J; Sharma LR; Bhansali A
[Ad] Address:From: Department of Endocrinology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012.
[Ti] Title:BROWN TUMOR OF THE PALATE.
[So] Source:Endocr Pract;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1530-891X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.4158/EP-2017-0225

  7 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367531
[Au] Autor:Azuma K; Tamura M; Makino H; Sekiguchi M; Azuma N; Kitano M; Matsui K; Sano H
[Ad] Address:Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine.
[Ti] Title:[A case of axial spondyloarthritis acute onset as opportunity tonsil foci infection].
[So] Source:Nihon Rinsho Meneki Gakkai Kaishi;40(6):460-466, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7413
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:  A 49-year-old female with a chief complaints of arthralgia, and a medical history is Hashimoto's disease presented to us. She had been previously treated for Sjögren's syndrome at our hospital. She had anterior chest and polyarticular pain. On admission, her blood test results were as follows: white blood cells, 12700/µl; C reactive protein, 24.8 mg/dl; erythrocyte sedimentation rate 122 mm/h, Anti-streptolysin O, 1179 IU/ml;an, ASK, 10240. She had tenderness in both her hand and finger joints, recurrent episodes of tonsillitis and pustular eruption. Her imaging studies were remarkable for inflammation of the sacroiliac joint and bone erosion of the hand joint, among other findings. We considered a diagnosis of either axial spondyloarthritis or synovitis acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome due to an opportunistic tonsillar infection. The differential diagnosis between axial spondyloarthritis or SAPHO syndrome is difficult to make. We discuss this case in the context of previous literature.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Opportunistic Infections/complications
Spondylarthritis/complications
Spondylarthritis/diagnosis
Tonsillitis/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome
Acute Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2177/jsci.40.460

  8 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29382467
[Au] Autor:King EM; Cerajewska TL; Locke M; Claydon NCA; Davies M; West NX
[Ad] Address:Specialty Trainee, Restorative Dentistry, University of Bristol, Oral and Dental Sciences, Bristol, UK.
[Ti] Title:The Efficacy of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors for the Treatment of Alveolar Osteitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Jan 08.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5053
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF; BTI Biotechnology Institute, San Antonio, Spain) for the treatment of alveolar osteitis compared with a positive control (Alvogyl; Septodont, Maidstone, Kent, UK). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This single-center, single-blinded, randomized, 2-treatment, parallel study was conducted in a UK dental hospital. All healthy adults who presented with alveolar osteitis after tooth extraction over a 3-month period were invited to participate. Each socket was randomized and treated with 1 of 2 treatment modalities, a test treatment (PRGF) or a positive control (Alvogyl). After treatment, patients were reviewed at 3 and 7 days by a second clinician blinded to the treatment given. Outcome measures included pain, exposed bone, inflammation, halitosis, dysgeusia, and quality-of-life assessment. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients with data from 44 sockets (22 in the PRGF group and 22 in the Alvogyl group) were analyzed. The PRGF group showed significantly faster bone coverage and significantly decreased inflammation and halitosis (P < .05) compared with the control group receiving Alvogyl. There was no significant difference for pain, quality-of-life measures, or dysgeusia between groups. CONCLUSION: PRGF predictably treated alveolar osteitis after tooth extraction compared with the conventional standard treatment of Alvogyl, which has been used for many years. PRGF could be considered an alternative treatment for alveolar osteitis and indeed appears to have considerable advantages over Alvogyl.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476220
[Au] Autor:Meixel AJ; Hauswald H; Delorme S; Jobke B
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:From radiation osteitis to osteoradionecrosis: incidence and MR morphology of radiation-induced sacral pathologies following pelvic radiotherapy.
[So] Source:Eur Radiol;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1084
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence rate, time-to-onset and recovery, MRI morphology and occurrence of insufficiency fractures in radiation-induced changes in the sacrum following pelvic radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 410 patients with pelvic malignancies treated with radiotherapy were reviewed. Follow-up was 1-124 months (mean 22 months). Serial MRI (average four studies/patient) were analysed using a new semi-quantitative score (Radiation-Induced Sacral Changes=RISC). A size category (I/II/III), a type category for MR signal morphologies (a/b/c) and sacral insufficiency fractures (+/-) were applied. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients (17.6 %) were found to have new pathological signal changes. Radiation osteitis was documented in 83.3 % (60/72, RISC stage a + b), and definite osteonecrosis (stage c) in 12 patients (16.7 %, 12/72). Thirty-one patients (43.1 %) had sacral insufficiency fractures. Initial bone marrow signal changes were found 1-35 months (median 4 months) after radiotherapy. The maximum manifestation of radiation-induced signal changes occurred after 1-35 months (mean 11 months). Fifty-six cases (77.8 %) showed a significant signal recovery within 16.5 months. CONCLUSION: Radiation-induced bone marrow changes appear with a high incidence at the sacrum with an early onset and frequent recovery. The majority presented a pattern of radiation osteitis, whereas osteoradionecrosis was proportionately rare. KEY POINTS: • Radiation-induced sacral bone marrow changes appear frequently (17.6 %) following pelvic radiotherapy. • Insufficiency fractures are common late effects (43 %). • Radiation osteitis develops early (4 mo), with recovery between 16.5 and 39.5 months. • Definite radiological osteoradionecrosis is proportionately rare (3 %). • A 3-stage classification system simplifies and standardizes the morphological disease staging.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180224
[Lr] Last revision date:180224
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00330-018-5325-2

  10 / 12207 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29342179
[Au] Autor:Ohyama Y; Ito J; Kitano VJ; Shimada J; Hakeda Y
[Ad] Address:Division of Oral Anatomy, Meikai University School of Dentistry, Sakado, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The polymethoxy flavonoid sudachitin suppresses inflammatory bone destruction by directly inhibiting osteoclastogenesis due to reduced ROS production and MAPK activation in osteoclast precursors.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191192, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inflammatory bone diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, periodontitis and peri-implantitis, are associated not only with the production of inflammatory cytokines but also with local oxidative status, which is defined by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Osteoclast differentiation has been reported to be related to increased intracellular ROS levels in osteoclast lineage cells. Sudachitin, which is a polymethoxyflavone derived from Citrus sudachi, possesses antioxidant properties and regulates various functions in mammalian cells. However, the effects of sudachitin on inflammatory bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. In calvaria inflamed by a local lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection, inflammation-induced bone destruction and the accompanying elevated expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes were reduced by the co-administration of sudachitin and LPS. Moreover, sudachitin inhibited osteoclast formation in cultures of isolated osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors. However, sudachitin rather increased the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which is an important molecule triggering osteoclast differentiation, and the mRNA ratio of RANKL/osteoprotegerin that is a decoy receptor for RANKL, in the isolated osteoblasts, suggesting the presence of additional target cells. When osteoclast formation was induced from osteoclast precursors derived from bone marrow cells in the presence of soluble RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, sudachitin inhibited osteoclastogenesis without influencing cell viability. Consistently, the expression of osteoclast differentiation-related molecules including c-fos, NFATc1, cathepsin K and osteoclast fusion proteins such as DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2 was reduced by sudachitin. In addition, sudachitin decreased activation of MAPKs such as Erk and JNK and the ROS production evoked by RANKL in osteoclast lineage cells. Our findings suggest that sudachitin is a useful agent for the treatment of anti-inflammatory bone destruction.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Flavonoids/pharmacology
Glycosides/pharmacology
Osteoclasts/drug effects
Osteoclasts/metabolism
Osteogenesis/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bone Density Conservation Agents/pharmacology
Bone Resorption/metabolism
Bone Resorption/pathology
Bone Resorption/prevention & control
Cell Differentiation/drug effects
Cell Lineage
Coculture Techniques
Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity
MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Osteitis/metabolism
Osteitis/pathology
Osteitis/prevention & control
Osteoclasts/cytology
Osteogenesis/physiology
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
Stem Cells/cytology
Stem Cells/drug effects
Stem Cells/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bone Density Conservation Agents); 0 (Flavonoids); 0 (Glycosides); 0 (Lipopolysaccharides); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 0 (sudachitin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191192


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