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[PMID]: 29510680
[Au] Autor:Jones C; Sharma M; Harkus S; McMahon C; Taumoepeau M; Demuth K; Mattock K; Rosas L; Wing R; Pawar S; Hampshire A
[Ad] Address:MARCS Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia. caroline.jones@westernsydney.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:A program to respond to otitis media in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: a qualitative investigation of parent perspectives.
[So] Source:BMC Pediatr;18(1):99, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Indigenous infants and children in Australia, especially in remote communities, experience early and chronic otitis media (OM) which is difficult to treat and has lifelong impacts in health and education. The LiTTLe Program (Learning to Talk, Talking to Learn) aimed to increase infants' access to spoken language input, teach parents to manage health and hearing problems, and support children's school readiness. This paper aimed to explore caregivers' views about this inclusive, parent-implemented early childhood program for 0-3 years in an Aboriginal community health context. METHODS: Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 9 caregivers of 12 children who had participated in the program from one remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory are presented. Data were analysed thematically. Caregivers provided overall views on the program. In addition, three key areas of focus in the program are also presented here: speech and language, hearing health, and school readiness. RESULTS: Caregivers were positive about the interactive speech and language strategies in the program, except for some strategies which some parents found alien or difficult: such as talking slowly, following along with the child's topic, using parallel talk, or baby talk. Children's hearing was considered by caregivers to be important for understanding people, enjoying music, and detecting environmental sounds including signs of danger. Caregivers provided perspectives on the utility of sign language and its benefits for communicating with infants and young children with hearing loss, and the difficulty of getting young community children to wear a conventional hearing aid. Caregivers were strongly of the opinion that the program had helped prepare children for school through familiarising their child with early literacy activities and resources, as well as school routines. But caregivers differed as to whether they thought the program should have been located at the school itself. CONCLUSIONS: The caregivers generally reported positive views about the LiTTLe Program, and also drew attention to areas for improvement. The perspectives gathered may serve to guide other cross-sector collaborations across health and education to respond to OM among children at risk for OM-related disability in speech and language development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12887-018-1081-3

  2 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523606
[Au] Autor:Singh A; Irugu DVK; Verma H; Thakar A
[Ad] Address:Department of ENT, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Atypical presentation of aural tuberculosis with complication.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tuberculosis involving mastoid and ear is an uncommon entity presenting with myriads of non-specific features and difficult to diagnose, being a paucibacillary condition. The involvement of otomastoid compartment is hypothesised to be of haematogenous origin. Rarely it can spread directly via tympanic membrane perforation or via reflux through eustachian tube. The usual picture of presentation tends to be one of indolent ear infection not responsive to usual antibiotic treatment and symptomatology being out of proportion to examination findings. We present a case of aural tuberculosis presenting with zygomatic and Bezold abscess without other symptoms, and the usefulness of GeneXpert test in mycobacterial detection in such paucibacillary conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29287884
[Au] Autor:Kim BJ; Kim J; Park IY; Jung JY; Suh MW; Oh SH
[Ad] Address:Wide River Institute of Immunology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:Effects of transient auditory deprivation during critical periods on the development of auditory temporal processing.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;104:66-71, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The central auditory pathway matures through sensory experiences and it is known that sensory experiences during periods called critical periods exert an important influence on brain development. The present study aimed to investigate whether temporary auditory deprivation during critical periods (CPs) could have a detrimental effect on the development of auditory temporal processing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve neonatal rats were randomly assigned to control and study groups; Study group experienced temporary (18-20 days) auditory deprivation during CPs (Early deprivation study group). Outcome measures included changes in auditory brainstem response (ABR), gap prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GPIAS), and gap detection threshold (GDT). To further delineate the specific role of CPs in the outcome measures above, the same paradigm was applied in adult rats (Late deprivation group) and the findings were compared with those of the neonatal rats. RESULTS: Soon after the restoration of hearing, early deprivation study animals showed a significantly lower GPIAS at intermediate gap durations and a larger GDT than early deprivation controls, but these differences became insignificant after subsequent auditory inputs. Additionally, the ABR results showed significantly delayed latencies of waves IV, V, and interpeak latencies of wave I-III and wave I-V in study group. Late deprivation group didn't exhibit any deterioration in temporal processing following sensory deprivation. CONCLUSION: Taken together, the present results suggest that transient auditory deprivation during CPs might cause reversible disruptions in the development of temporal processing.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Auditory Pathways/physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem/physiology
Reflex, Startle/physiology
Sensory Deprivation/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Auditory Threshold
Critical Period (Psychology)
Hearing Tests
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171231
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29400039
[Au] Autor:Plantier D; Gusmão de Araújo J; Portmann D; Guindi S
[Ti] Title:Cholesteatoma and osteoradionecrosis after radio­therapy of the temporal bone: Surgical aspects.
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(4):163-5, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: The treatment for head and neck cancer with radiotherapy can cause different alterations of the auditory system. We report two cases of chronic otitis of the external and middle ear secondary to osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone. This article aims to report the experience of the surgical approach in such condition. Cases report: The first patient was treated with radiotherapy in his childhood for a cerebellar tumor. He developed years later a cholesteatoma which invaded the mastoid cavities through a destruction of the external auditory canal. The second was treated for a malignant parotid tumour 15 years before by surgery and radiotherapy. She developed a chronic otorrhea with a partial destruction of the bony external auditory canal. Both patients were treated by surgery with reconstruction including bone, cartilage, fascia and skin grafts. The outcome was good in both cases. Osteo­radio­necrosis of the temporal bone is a rare but serious complication of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. This complication can occur even many years after the treatment. Our two cases demonstrate a way to solve this pathology. A long term supervision with regular cares is essential in order to get a good healing. Due to the improvement of the radiation therapy we could expect less complications of this type in the future.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear/etiology
Osteoradionecrosis/etiology
Radiotherapy/adverse effects
Temporal Bone/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cerebellar Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear/surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoradionecrosis/surgery
Parotid Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Temporal Bone/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29203544
[Au] Autor:Perez AC; Johnson A; Chen Z; Wilding GE; Malkowski MG; Murphy TF
[Ad] Address:Clinical and Translational Research Center, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.
[Ti] Title:Mapping Protective Regions on a Three-Dimensional Model of the Moraxella catarrhalis Vaccine Antigen Oligopeptide Permease A.
[So] Source:Infect Immun;86(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5522
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A vaccine against would reduce tremendous morbidity, mortality, and financial burden by preventing otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults. Oligopeptide permease A (OppA) is a candidate vaccine antigen that is (i) a nutritional virulence factor expressed on the bacterial cell surface during infection, (ii) widely conserved among strains, (iii) highly immunogenic, and (iv) a protective antigen based on its capacity to induce protective responses in immunized animals. In the present study, we show that the antibodies to OppA following vaccination mediate accelerated clearance in animals after pulmonary challenge. To identify regions of OppA that bind protective antibodies, truncated constructs of OppA were engineered and studied to map regions of OppA with surface-accessible epitopes that bind high-avidity antibodies following vaccination. Protective epitopes were located in the N and C termini of the protein. Immunization of mice with constructs corresponding to these regions (T5 and T8) induced protective responses. Studies of overlapping peptide libraries of constructs T5 and T8 with OppA immune serum identified two discrete regions on each construct. These potentially protective regions were mapped on a three-dimensional computational model of OppA, where regions with solvent-accessible amino acids were identified as three potentially protective epitopes. In all, these studies revealed two regions with three specific epitopes in OppA that induce potentially protective antibody responses following vaccination. Detection of antibodies to these regions could serve to guide vaccine formulation and as a diagnostic tool for monitoring development of protective responses during clinical trials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29429183
[Au] Autor:Fu T; Zhang K; Zhang XW; Wang ZY
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao 266003, China.
[Ti] Title:[Correlation between patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction and acquired middle ear cholesteatoma].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi;53(2):131-133, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1673-0860
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:By comparing the clinical characteristics of patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction and those of non-Eustachian tube abnormalities, we aimed to investigate the relationship between patulous Eustachian tube and acquired cholesteatoma of middle ear. A total of 218 patients in Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University from November 2011 to November 2016 who underwent surgical treatment and with complete data of acquired cholesteatoma of middle ear were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction and non-Patulous Eustachian tube. Their ages of onset , sides, characteristics of acoustic immitance, clinical manifestations, prognosis and complications were compared. The statistical analysis was carried out with SPSS 19.0 software. Among the 218 cases of acquired cholesteatoma of the middle ear, 22 cases were diagnosed as patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction [with average age of (35.7±7.5) years]; 196 cases were diagnosed as non-patulous Eustachian tube [with average age of (47.8±20.1) years]. The average age of the patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction was significantly lower than that of the non-patulous Eustachian tube group ( =4.25, <0.01). Ratio of bilateral middle ear cholesteatoma in patulous Eustachian tube [68.2%(15/22)] was significantly higher than that of the non-patulous Eustachian tube group [18.9%(37/196)] (χ(2)=26.47, <0.01). Some acquired cholesteatoma patients are associated with the patulous Eustachian tube with habitual nasal extraction. The patients have a lower age, and are susceptible for bilateral middle ear cholesteatoma.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear/diagnosis
Eustachian Tube
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acoustics
Adult
Age of Onset
Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear/etiology
Humans
Nose
Otitis Media/diagnosis
Prognosis
Software
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.1673-0860.2018.02.009

  7 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394357
[Au] Autor:Pipkins HR; Bradshaw JL; Keller LE; McDaniel LS
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA.
[Ti] Title:Virulence of an Encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae is Increased Upon Expression of Pneumococcal Surface Protein K.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Current Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines selectively target capsular polysaccharide of specific serotypes, leading to an increase in nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp). Cocolonization by encapsulated pneumococci and NESp increases the opportunity of intra-species genetic exchange. Acquisition of NESp genes by encapsulated pneumococci could alter virulence and help vaccine-targeted serotypes persist in the host. Methods: Adhesion and invasion assay were performed using immortalized human pharyngeal or lung epithelial cells. In vivo models assessing murine nasopharyngeal colonization and pneumonia as well as chinchilla otitis media (OM) were also used. Results: PspK expression increased encapsulated pneumococcal adhesion and invasion of lung cells and enhanced virulence during pneumonia and OM. Additionally, PspK increased nasopharyngeal colonization, persistence in the lungs, and persistence in the middle ear when expressed in a capsule deletion mutant. Competition experiments demonstrated encapsulated pneumococci expressing PspK also had a selective advantage in both the lungs and nasopharynx. Conclusions: PspK increases pneumococcal virulence during pneumonia and OM. PspK also partially compensate for loss of virulence in the absence of capsule. Additionally, PspK provides a selective advantage in a competitive environment. Therefore, acquisition of PspK increases encapsulated virulence in a condition-dependent manner. Together, these studies demonstrate risks associated with pneumococcal intra-species genetic exchange.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jiy058

  8 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29363210
[Au] Autor:Chan WY; Hickey EE; Khazandi M; Page SW; Trott DJ; Hill PB
[Ad] Address:Australian Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance Ecology, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA, 5371, Australia.
[Ti] Title:In vitro antimicrobial activity of narasin against common clinical isolates associated with canine otitis externa.
[So] Source:Vet Dermatol;29(2):149-e57, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial stewardship are of ever-increasing importance in veterinary medicine. Re-purposing of old drugs that are not used in human medicine is one approach that addresses the emergence of multidrug resistance in canine skin and ear infections, and can reduce the use of critically important human antibiotic classes. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To determine the antimicrobial activity of narasin, a polyether ionophore conventionally used as a rumen modifier and anticoccidial agent in production animals, against common clinical isolates of canine otitis externa (OE). ANIMALS/ISOLATES: Clinical isolates (n = 110) from canine OE were tested, including 17 meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP), 13 multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MDRSP), and 20 each of ß-haemolytic Streptococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Malassezia pachydermatis. METHODS: Bacterial and yeast isolates were subcultured, suspended in broth and inoculated into 96-well plates. Organisms were tested against concentrations of narasin ranging from 0.03 to 128 µg/mL. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined after overnight incubation. RESULTS: Narasin MICs for staphylococcal and streptococcal isolates ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 µg/mL; MIC and MIC values for both organisms were 0.125 µg/mL. No MICs were achieved for Pseudomonas or Proteus isolates. There was a weak antifungal effect against M. pachydermatis isolates (MIC 32 to >128 µg/mL). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Narasin was effective against Gram-positive bacteria and had antifungal activity at higher concentrations against M. pachydermatis. However, the lack of Gram-negative activity would prevent its use as a sole antimicrobial agent in cases of canine OE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/vde.12516

  9 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29186364
[Au] Autor:Malosh RE; Martin ET; Heikkinen T; Brooks WA; Whitley RJ; Monto AS
[Ad] Address:University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor MI.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and Safety of Oseltamivir in Children: Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2017 Nov 23.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Oseltamivir has been used to treat children with influenza for nearly two decades, with treatment currently approved for infants 2 weeks of age or older, but efficacy and safety remain controversial. Newer randomized placebo controlled trials (RCT), not included in previous meta-analyses, can add to the evidence base. Methods: We conducted a systematic review to identify RCTs of oseltamivir therapy in children. We obtained individual patient data and examined protocol-defined outcomes. We then conducted a two-stage, random effects meta-analysis to determine the efficacy of treatment in reducing the duration of illness, estimated using differences in restricted mean survival time (RSMT) by treatment group. We also examined complications and safety. Results: We identified 5 trials including 2561 patients in the intent to treat (ITT) and 1598 in the intent to treat infected (ITTI) population. Overall, oseltamivir treatment significantly reduced the duration of illness in the ITTI population (RMST difference -17.6 hours 95% CI: -34.7 to -0.62 hours). In trials that enrolled patients without asthma, the difference was larger (-29.9 hours 95% CI -53.9 to -5.8 hours). Risk of otitis media was 34% lower in the ITTI population. Vomiting was the only adverse event with a significantly higher risk in the treatment group. Conclusion: Despite substantial heterogeneity in pediatric trials, we found that treatment with oseltamivir significantly reduced the duration of illness in those with influenza and lowered the risk of developing otitis media. Alternative endpoints may be required to evaluate the efficacy of oseltamivir in pediatric patients with asthma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1040

  10 / 29922 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28460120
[Au] Autor:Angurana SK; Jayashree M; Bansal A; Singhi S; Nallasamy K
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India.
[Ti] Title:Post-neonatal Tetanus in a PICU of a Developing Economy: Intensive Care Needs, Outcome and Predictors of Mortality.
[So] Source:J Trop Pediatr;64(1):15-23, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3664
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives: To evaluate pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) needs, outcome and predictors of mortality in post-neonatal tetanus. Materials and methods: Review of 30 consecutive post-neonatal tetanus cases aged 1 months to 12 years admitted to a PICU in north India over a period of 10 years (January 2006 to December 2015). Results: Chronic suppurative otitis media was the commonest portal of entry. All received tetanus toxoid, human tetanus immunoglobulin (HTIG) and appropriate antibiotics; 7 (23.3%) received intrathecal HTIG. Common complications were respiratory failure, rhabdomyolysis, autonomic dysfunction, acute kidney injury and healthcare-associated infections. PICU needs were as follows: ventilation; benzodiazepine, morphine and magnesium sulfate infusion; neuromuscular blockers, inotropes, tracheostomy and renal replacement therapy. Mortality rate was 40%; severity Grade IIIb, autonomic dysfunction, use of vasoactive drugs and those who did not receive intrathecal HTIG were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Post-neonatal tetanus is associated with high mortality, and PICU needs include management of spasms, autonomic dysfunction and complications and cardiorespiratory support.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/tropej/fmx020


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